Bringing Your Product to Market; Jeffrey Mangus Talks About the Importance of Quality Writing When Launching Your Product

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Jeffrey Mangus
I'm a professional ghostwriter specializing in Non-fiction Books, eBooks, Blogs and Web pages. I have over 25+ years as professional writer/ghostwriter and I help entrepreneurs solopreneurs, large and small businesses, tell their story and write their books for the world to read.
I have helped everyone from celebrities, musicians, recording artists, politicians, business owners, marketing agencies, literary agents and publishing houses big or small, write their books and tell the world their story.
I believe every business needs a book to help market their product or services. Plus, having a book will build your brand along with creating an additional residual income stream. That is not too shabby if you ask me. You have a book in you. I know you do and I’d love to ghostwrite your book and share it with the world.
I also KNOW one inevitable thing…Every business, big or small, has a book in them and a unique story to tell the world.
Watch the podcast here!
 

Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
hi everyone and welcome to the Venice
0:03
launchpad and network
0:04
I am carmine Dennis Koh your host for
0:07
today's show with me I have a gentleman
0:09
who is an expert in helping people not
0:12
only organize their business run it
0:14
better more proficient and they caught
0:16
lean manufacturing and I think that's
0:19
the term forward his name is Jason
0:20
Burton I have him on a line and he's
0:23
gonna give us some tips tricks some
0:24
hints on how we all could be more
0:26
proficient in probably our business but
0:28
also probably just in our daily lives so
0:30
hey Jason you over there I am Carmen
0:33
thank you very much for having me on the
0:34
show I appreciate it oh no man I'm so
0:37
glad to have you on has actually been
0:38
waiting for this opportunity to talk to
0:40
you cuz I'm one of those guys who I
0:42
think I'm super organized I think I'm
0:43
pretty proficient at when I come to work
0:45
and I do think but there's always always
0:47
room for improvement and I was like
0:50
super glad to have you on because I've
0:52
read some books about me manufacturing I
0:55
read things about that and I was always
0:57
interested in how not only does someone
0:59
get into that but how implementing it
1:02
but I want to back up a little bit
1:04
talked a little bit about you first and
1:06
and tell us a little bit about your
1:08
business your company and and kind of
1:10
how you got into this crazy business so
1:13
lean proficiency or manufacturing is
1:15
that the term lean manufacturing yeah
1:17
it's it is it's a kind of lean
1:20
manufacturing that's probably the most
1:21
common term and really what lean
1:23
manufacturing it's really what
1:27
originally started is the Toyota
1:28
Production system so Toyota actually
1:30
started this many many many years ago
1:32
and as it came over to the US it kind of
1:35
during a very early book and publication
1:38
that came out as lean manufacturing and
1:40
that term has kind of stuck in the u.s.
1:42
for many many years so in the and how I
1:46
got into it I worked at a company called
1:50
herman miller to make office furniture
1:52
for 15 years and i was pretty lucky the
1:57
very early in my career in the mid 90s
2:00
they partnered actually with Toyota
2:02
manufacturing Toyota came in and became
2:06
their consultants to help Herman Miller
2:08
learn about the Toyota Production system
2:10
and lean manufacturing so I was
2:12
fortunate to
2:13
be there during their 15 year transition
2:15
to you know essentially a lien company
2:20
or you know learning and developing the
2:22
Toyota Production system within there
2:24
are four walls and out to their
2:26
dealerships and suppliers so I was a
2:29
part of that journey for many years had
2:31
Toyota directly as my coaches and
2:33
sensei's and eventually let's see I
2:37
think in 2011 I had made so many
2:41
connections in the industry and had so
2:43
many bad many many people calling asked
2:45
me to come consult and help with their
2:47
companies it kind of just teed up as a
2:49
business and I left Herman Miller and
2:52
and started consulting and and haven't
2:54
looked back since so I've been
2:56
consulting since 2011 essentially
3:00
working with companies in any industry
3:02
whether it's startups in early small
3:06
businesses or you know 150 200 million
3:10
dollar companies and everywhere in
3:12
between helping them essentially
3:15
implement lean manufacturing or the
3:17
Toyota Production system within their
3:18
company to be you know increased
3:22
customer satisfaction become more
3:23
efficient you know there's a lot of
3:25
aspects to it but that's essentially
3:26
what I do I work with businesses to help
3:29
them get better
3:30
yeah well that's that's all you know a
3:32
lot of times you and you probably see it
3:35
you make it sound easy like I'm gonna go
3:38
but you're one of those guys that comes
3:41
in and you know most people are scared
3:44
of change and and when you walk into a
3:46
company you know you're probably it's
3:49
you know we talked a little bit before
3:50
we start recording it's it's uh it's a
3:53
scary thing for not only employees but
3:55
also business owners bringing somebody
3:58
on like yourself because they have to
4:00
really face the things they've been
4:02
doing for a long time that maybe aren't
4:04
right but it's nothing wrong with that
4:06
it's just you're there to help them do
4:08
you do you run it too sometimes you you
4:09
know people really getting getting
4:11
pushback from people oh yeah I mean you
4:13
said that correctly in the beginning
4:15
your change is very difficult for
4:16
everyone whether you're at a leadership
4:18
level whether you're you know the people
4:21
putting bolts in the products at all
4:24
levels and meets between changes where
4:27
you
4:27
difficult it's very hard I think it you
4:30
know from it from a leadership
4:31
perspective it's difficult sometimes
4:33
almost from an ego standpoint you know
4:35
I'm the leader I'm the one driving this
4:37
company and for to ask for help is
4:40
difficult for any of us right just human
4:41
nature in general it's hard to ask for
4:43
help
4:43
I think we all have that challenge
4:46
especially when you're put in a position
4:48
of leadership and you're expected to
4:50
have the answer so you know with Toyota
4:52
the Toyota Production system we
4:54
manufacturing leadership is a big part
4:56
of it of being willing to be humble and
4:59
say I don't know and go down this path
5:01
of this journey of learning and then you
5:05
know obviously change is difficult
5:06
throughout the rest of the organization
5:08
because processes are gonna change the
5:10
way they do things you know they've done
5:12
it the same way for 20 years or you know
5:14
whatever that timeline is the processes
5:17
will change and once again I think the
5:19
great thing about lean manufacturing or
5:21
the Toyota Production system is it's
5:23
very people centric it's very focused on
5:26
it's not a you know even though it's
5:28
used in negative context it's not a
5:31
process that comes in and says we're
5:34
here to fire people it's if you're doing
5:37
it the right way if you're truly
5:38
following Toyota the way that they do it
5:39
like I said with every process there's a
5:42
there's people that use it for bad I
5:44
guess you would say you know you use it
5:46
for evil but it's not something where
5:48
you come in and you're here to dis take
5:50
jobs away you're here to actually make
5:52
things better more efficient easier for
5:54
the people that are doing the work more
5:56
ergonomically correct you know trying to
5:59
clarify the processes you know and
6:01
trying to do everything we can if we if
6:03
we can make the jobs easier for everyone
6:04
in the entire company all the way from
6:07
you know the people like I said on the
6:09
shop floor doing the real value add all
6:11
the way up through leadership it's gonna
6:12
make the entire company work better and
6:14
more efficient so that's really the
6:16
approach that I take is based on the
6:17
Toyota Production system and you know
6:19
being very focused on helping the
6:21
employees you know I I totally agree and
6:25
like we said change is very tough but
6:28
how cool is that that you were there at
6:30
the beginning I mean how fortunate to be
6:33
able to learn that process I mean I mean
6:36
it sounds like you took it to heart when
6:38
when they came in like man this is an
6:39
opportunity to really
6:41
learn something that you're gonna be
6:43
able to take with you throughout your
6:44
whole life I mean it's so cool I mean
6:45
Toyota it would that is like the the
6:48
main focus I mean everyone wanted to
6:51
follow what they were doing yeah I kind
6:53
of look at it as like my MBA I don't
6:55
have an MBA but for me that is my you
6:58
know my check it really kind of
7:00
accentuates my career and you know I was
7:03
actually working on the assembly line at
7:05
Herman Miller when they started in 95
7:06
and at that point in time they didn't
7:09
even we didn't even really know what it
7:12
was gonna be what it was about I really
7:14
didn't have any idea but I knew that it
7:16
was a I saw there was an opportunity so
7:18
I raised my hand very quickly you know
7:20
saying I want to get involved and and
7:22
with then you know a couple years I was
7:24
literally you know side by side with to
7:27
the other shoulder to shoulder making
7:28
changes in the process and learning what
7:30
they learn you know what they know so
7:32
yeah I was it was a huge opportunity it
7:35
got to I actually even got to the point
7:37
in 2000 we were trying to advance our
7:41
learning as far as lean manufacturing
7:42
the Toyota Production system and Herman
7:44
Miller stunt meat at Toyota North
7:46
America corporate headquarters and I
7:48
actually became a toy to employee for
7:49
about a year and a half working with
7:51
their consulting group to learn even
7:54
more in depth about the Toyota
7:55
Production system and then bring it back
7:57
to her Miller so I've been very
7:59
fortunate with that whole relationship
8:00
and it has really crafted my whole
8:04
career whether it's you know like you
8:06
mentioned earlier from my daily life and
8:08
how I look at things and solve problems
8:10
and organize myself to you know like I
8:13
said earlier before the show started we
8:15
were talking you know I have some
8:16
products that I'm trying to bring to
8:17
market how I use how I view that process
8:21
as far as the new product development
8:23
process and using a lot of the the lean
8:25
thinking in that process and then
8:28
obviously working with my clients so
8:29
it's really impacted me as a whole and
8:32
both work and you know personal life as
8:35
well so it probably has to like you
8:38
couldn't separate no no not at all not
8:42
at all you know one of the things that
8:44
you know those of us that have been you
8:48
know immersed in Toyota Production
8:50
system Lee manufacturing for a lot of
8:51
years it's kind of a blessing and a
8:53
curse because one of the things
8:54
trained to do is see problems in the
8:57
system see problems in the process so
9:00
you know we kind of joke around because
9:01
everywhere we look everywhere we go
9:03
every company we walk into we see
9:05
nothing but problems right I'm sitting
9:07
in an airport I see nothing but ok
9:09
that's not efficient on how they're
9:11
loading this that's not efficient over
9:12
here or I'm sitting in Starbucks
9:13
watching you know the lineup in the
9:16
backup of people going ok that's not
9:17
efficient all this sir butts over here
9:19
was a lot more efficient because they
9:20
did XYZ it's this constant analysis of
9:24
you're just looking and trying to see
9:25
where the gap is as far as what it
9:27
should be compared to what it you know
9:29
what it currently is today so it's
9:32
definitely impacted every part of my
9:33
life for sure that's really cool in it
9:36
and real quick before before we
9:39
continues that I mean just getting a lot
9:42
of questions in my head to think about
9:43
is that what's that you know ok so one
9:45
of our listeners has to jump off some
9:47
quick contact information or website
9:48
that people can go to sure
9:51
so my consulting website is and it's not
9:54
an easy domain name but it's a hip eh i
9:58
IP consulting.com and we actually you
10:03
know just so that you have it we
10:05
actually created a or creating a landing
10:09
page for your listeners so they can and
10:12
go to it it'll be e hip consulting comm
10:14
forward slash launchpad and they'll be
10:17
able to go on there and download a
10:20
simple little ebook I have connect with
10:23
me and social media and contact me in
10:26
general so nice little place for your
10:29
listeners to go to after the show is
10:31
done so and we'll have all that in our
10:34
show notes too so if you're driving
10:36
don't pull over and bring that down or
10:39
don't try writing it down while you're
10:40
driving one a little little hit there so
10:43
cool so you had mentioned which I didn't
10:46
know this you you're doing some products
10:47
yourself these home goods industrial
10:51
type products yeah so I have two
10:54
products that I've you know it's
10:56
interesting I've been working on it for
10:59
way too long let me just say that you
11:02
know is every inventor right to products
11:06
that I'm bringing to market in in
11:08
it's always interesting as I reflect
11:10
through that process and trying to make
11:12
sure that I'm using my own tools of my
11:15
own coaching in my own process and you
11:18
know I think that helps me work and
11:21
relate with a lot of companies because I
11:22
am trying to use you know what I'm
11:25
preaching or what I'm trying to coach
11:26
others I'm trying to use it myself and
11:28
my own process but yeah the products
11:30
today I'm working on right now one is a
11:33
office furniture product you know I
11:37
mentioned earlier that I travel a lot
11:38
I'm gone most every day working at
11:41
clients it's a product where it helps
11:45
the with security of computer laptop and
11:49
other devices when you're in a public
11:50
space and then I have another product
11:54
that is a fitness equipment product that
11:58
I'm that I'm working on bringing to
11:59
market so a couple different you know
12:01
completely different industries but
12:02
problems that I once again you know I
12:06
see problems problems that I saw
12:08
problems that I experienced that I'm
12:09
trying to solve through product design
12:11
so that's pretty cool
12:13
now as the inventor side of you you
12:18
probably are torn because you want to
12:19
move ahead really fast get their product
12:21
going and you knock him and then the
12:23
other side he was like whoa wait a
12:24
minute we need to go through these steps
12:26
and check it so is that something that
12:28
you're kind of continually fighting with
12:30
yourself about it is because and I think
12:34
the biggest struggle with me is time so
12:37
you know how much do I offload to
12:41
someone versus try and you know manage
12:43
myself and I made in the reason I say
12:45
that both these products have taken way
12:47
too much time it's very early on I'm
12:50
very busy with my consulting business I
12:52
tried to find a partner or a couple
12:57
partners to take it 100% and I wasn't
12:59
involved enough myself and it both the
13:03
products went down pasts it I don't
13:05
think made sense from a development
13:06
standpoint from you know you talked
13:08
earlier on some your other podcasts
13:10
about the whole you know manufacturing
13:11
decisions you know where it's me and who
13:13
your partner with there were a lot of
13:15
decisions that I outsource essentially
13:18
and I shouldn't have and you
13:21
for I was able to really kind of check
13:23
that process and see where I was at it
13:26
kind of went too far down the road so
13:27
you know as I was going through your
13:29
guys's website on the launch pad and
13:31
stuff you know I could see from the
13:33
comments and stuff you're very involved
13:35
with your investment inventors and and
13:37
kind of check-in points and stuff like
13:38
that and and that was just a gap that I
13:40
had so so now I've kind of taken a step
13:43
back and I have a great partner from a
13:46
developments and developer that I'm
13:48
working with a local engineering group
13:50
and I'm you know taking it slow and
13:52
making sure that I have the right
13:54
check-ins at the right time to make sure
13:56
that I'm involved in those critical
13:58
decisions so and that's a great example
14:01
where I wasn't using my own learning
14:03
right you know in Toyota Production
14:04
system it's a very clear process and
14:06
there's there's very clear you know
14:09
check points to confirm quality to
14:11
confirm your meeting you know all the
14:13
needs of the customer whether that be me
14:15
or my end customer that I'm trying to
14:16
design product forum for a night and I
14:19
didn't follow my own teaching I kind of
14:21
hand it off expecting someone else to
14:24
kind of think that way and that was my
14:26
own mistake in my own you know stumble
14:28
along the way so just makes me you know
14:31
this just helps me learn a little bit
14:34
more and be better the next time right
14:35
oh no doubt man hey at least you're
14:38
about it and you know this you caught it
14:41
you had the foresight you had the
14:43
ability you have the knowledge to know
14:45
when it was going the wrong way which is
14:47
man you you get products sometimes that
14:51
have really gone too far
14:53
and we wish they had come to us and and
14:55
and let us reevaluate because sure each
14:58
step is so important for the next step
15:01
and being able as you with your
15:04
knowledge you can foresee that end
15:06
result and you've already worked out how
15:08
to get there
15:09
yeah and you need good people not
15:12
everyone does everything on their own
15:13
when they think you can't do it all by
15:14
your swamp you know so that's why having
15:17
the right people to help and and
15:18
everything every step of the way when
15:20
somebody's coming to us with a product
15:22
we're looking to manufacture it so that
15:25
it can be shipped correctly so that can
15:26
be shipped with low cost I mean each
15:28
step is like a domino effect and that's
15:30
right that you even though it took
15:32
taking you longer when that product
15:34
reaches you you're gonna
15:35
be confident that it was done the
15:37
correct way yeah definitely definitely
15:39
and and I think that's definitely made
15:41
me a better coach in terms of smaller
15:45
businesses most of my clients earlier on
15:47
we're larger entities which you know
15:49
they kind of have the machine right they
15:51
have the machine of all the people doing
15:53
the stuff that they need to do and it
15:55
was difficult sometimes when I work with
15:57
these smaller companies from the
16:01
standpoint that not the the the Toyota
16:03
Production side of it but just me
16:05
understanding all the things that need
16:07
to get done in the multiple hats and a
16:09
lot of us as small business owners where
16:11
so I think it's kind of created to
16:13
Memphis view it means myself as far as
16:15
what does that look like as I'm working
16:17
with a small company that's only ten
16:18
people but you know they've you know
16:20
they're they're still early on in the
16:22
market phase you know what is my
16:24
relationship will look like with them
16:26
and how do i guide them through the
16:27
steps of going from you know ten
16:29
employees to fifty to a hundred and in
16:32
that growth pattern and and how you know
16:35
the product development cycle or taking
16:37
it wherever they're at in the process
16:39
it's just giving me a different
16:40
perspective which is I think a good
16:43
thing definitely yeah I could see that
16:45
happening you know come from ability
16:47
some from a company that's doing 200
16:48
million you come to a company that has
16:50
five employees obviously they can't they
16:52
don't have the resources that the other
16:54
companies hey hey hey we need ten SOPs
16:56
written okay that's right that's really
17:02
want to talk a little bit about that so
17:03
even every inventor not every inventor
17:07
but inventors who want to produce a
17:09
product and start their own business
17:11
some of them want a license which is
17:13
kind of good in a way there should be
17:14
some processes in place but an inventor
17:17
who wants to be a product developer who
17:19
wants to be a product manufacturer and
17:20
then a shipper and logistics and you
17:22
know we all that doesn't steps
17:25
what's great about what you do is you
17:27
can help them with that process
17:29
definitely in our company at first no no
17:32
company starts off - 100 million dollars
17:34
they they have to start off slow and and
17:36
put those processes in place and what
17:38
what you do is not going to do
17:41
everything correctly it's a thousand
17:42
times but if you have most of your
17:44
processes in place and you make an issue
17:46
or there's an error it's very easy to
17:49
recover right because that's right not a
17:52
detrimental problem it can be fixed if
17:54
you do it slowly the right way is that
17:55
something like that you try to go into a
17:58
company and you really you really just
18:00
sit there and you watch and you say okay
18:02
how is each to each of these things done
18:04
yeah especially in that early phase
18:06
right so you know you said it early best
18:08
so you know it's kind of a domino effect
18:10
right every small decision is a domino
18:12
effect in and so many small companies I
18:15
think I say small companies even some of
18:18
the midsize companies that I work with
18:20
don't even know who they want to be when
18:21
they grow up yet you know for example
18:25
you know a company that I worked with in
18:29
the past manufactured everything very
18:32
vertically integrated all the way from
18:34
raw material through you know multiple
18:38
machining and fabrication process to
18:39
assembly for the customer at the end of
18:42
the day when we really looked at their
18:43
business and saw what they were they
18:46
were a design company you know they what
18:48
they're their true differentiation in
18:51
the market was the engineering and
18:53
design and bringing new products to
18:54
market and you know very early on I
18:57
started challenged them so why are you
18:59
doing all this manufacturing yeah and
19:00
I'm an ops guy right I'm a manufacturing
19:02
guy but I was really trying to figure
19:05
out what was what was the the benefit
19:08
that was bringing to them as a company
19:10
and to their end customer and I think
19:13
you know ultimately I think they should
19:16
probably be an assembly company they
19:18
should own kind of that final quality
19:20
you know let's let's make sure that you
19:22
know what we're providing the customer
19:23
is what we want to provide the customer
19:25
in terms of quality reliability and all
19:27
these different things costs but at the
19:30
end of the day do they need to be taking
19:32
this block of metal and and you know
19:34
machining it down to X probably not
19:36
because the value they bring the
19:38
customer is the fact that this product
19:39
is unique in this way compared to the
19:42
competitors so so I think getting
19:45
involved with with these companies early
19:48
on I think you know it's that domino
19:50
effect every one of these decisions and
19:52
you can very easily go down a path that
19:55
takes a lot of energy a lot of resources
19:57
a lot of effort that may not be the
20:00
right thing for the company to that
20:01
point
20:02
and it can be the flip way right it can
20:04
be the opposite way we're a company
20:06
completely outsources all their
20:08
manufacturing it's like you know what
20:09
you should probably be doing this
20:11
because of X Y & Z because of quality
20:14
because it's unique process or because
20:16
of cost or or whatever reason so I think
20:18
every company is unique but I don't know
20:23
that everyone always thinks about you
20:24
know how each decision affects the next
20:27
I guess the best way to put it so yeah
20:29
that's that that's true though it's so
20:31
great that you can go in and work with
20:34
them and if you have I mean if you have
20:36
a company and and upper management that
20:39
are open to change it just must be so
20:41
much easier yeah yeah definitely yeah I
20:44
mean every come every company is
20:46
different as to you know how much
20:50
they're willing to change how much
20:53
they're willing to analyze their company
20:55
as a whole or are we just here to just
20:58
focus on operations are we just here to
21:00
focus on this part over here sometimes
21:03
the the way that I come to companies can
21:07
have an effect on on how much we can I
21:10
do I get hired a lot by equity firms
21:13
that by companies and they'll bring me
21:15
in say hey help this company it doesn't
21:18
necessarily mean that the leadership is
21:20
saying yeah come in and help me right
21:22
you know I was brought in by someone
21:23
else on the outside so every
21:25
relationships different and you know I
21:28
think it's you know me just saying hey
21:31
I'm here to help isn't necessarily you
21:33
know that's sometimes a negative thing
21:35
in a lot of people's eyes but it's
21:36
trying to find that right way that I can
21:38
provide some value and help them get to
21:40
a better position so yeah that's that
21:43
that's interesting I didn't think of it
21:45
like that a company that is being
21:46
acquired or some investment groups or
21:49
thing I could see them really bringing
21:51
you on just for the information hey you
21:54
know go on in there check this company
21:56
out maybe are they open to change can we
21:58
change them do they know what they want
21:59
to be the same thing could be for an
22:02
inventor we get a lot of inventors who
22:04
want to ingest invent products no
22:07
haven't come to grips with just want to
22:10
invent products then why are you going
22:12
to buy yours you're are you trying to
22:13
sell this product you know so how'd it
22:15
good in a way
22:16
a that that your they were having the
22:19
show because we want people to think
22:21
before the think about the process
22:23
before they get too deep into it yeah I
22:26
you know I I just a quick little story I
22:30
went to this company it was a very small
22:32
little company down the road from me and
22:36
this guy headed up for sale and I'm
22:38
always looking for whether it's a
22:40
company that you know my I might have
22:41
interested or my equity firms or
22:43
investment purposes and I walked in this
22:45
company is him his wife and one of the
22:47
guy running the company started talking
22:51
with him about the different products
22:52
and he's got all these new products
22:54
lined up and and eventually we're in
22:57
this conversation and I'm like why
22:58
haven't you taken all these new products
23:00
to market he goes well if I take it to
23:02
market they'll sell and then I'll have
23:04
to make him and I'm he was at a point in
23:07
his time his career where he was
23:08
perfectly comfortable with him his wife
23:10
just sitting there making the handful
23:12
that were selling and he was scared to
23:14
death that oh my gosh if I have to make
23:15
him and actually produce it for my
23:17
customer I don't know what the heck I'm
23:19
gonna do so I find it funny because he
23:21
had probably more clarity about his
23:24
business than a lot of companies that
23:26
are that are selling because he knew the
23:28
repercussions what it was going to take
23:30
to support what the customer what it was
23:32
gonna take to support operations where I
23:35
see companies on the flip side that are
23:37
just selling selling selling selling
23:38
selling or producing or you know
23:41
creating new products and they have no
23:43
idea what its gonna do to them or how
23:46
they're gonna actually handle it on the
23:47
flip side but so yeah it's always
23:51
interesting with all these different
23:52
companies they're all in a different
23:53
spot and they their journey to where
23:58
they are you know how they've gotten
23:59
there and and what their journey is
24:01:00
moving forward is is so unique and they
24:05:00
need to find a new way for each one of
24:07:00
them so when you travel do you travel um
24:11:00
mostly North America US base kind of all
24:14:00
over world most mostly us
24:17:00
I haven't had I've had a few different
24:20:00
clients want me to do some international
24:22:00
stuff but if at all possible I have some
24:25:00
relationships with some other consulting
24:28:00
individuals that I'll I'll use them I
24:30:00
haven't had a big pull internationally I
24:33:00
have enough business here in the US so
24:35:00
that's my main that's my main focus so
24:37:00
yeah I could see that being being a
24:40:00
little bit of an issue obviously going
24:41:00
to some other countries with with just
24:45:00
different customs and different
24:46:00
languages in different ways you'd have
24:47:00
to approach yeah I have enough of that
24:50:00
struggle just in the US where where we
24:53:00
walk in and you know and run you know
24:55:00
Southern California and the entire you
24:57:00
know workforce speaks Spanish and I
24:59:00
don't I'm not bilingual so you know all
25:01:00
of a sudden there's this language
25:02:00
barrier when we're trying to teach or
25:04:00
coach or this and and that's a challenge
25:06:00
in internally in our own country you
25:09:00
know that that there's ways around it
25:11:00
and we deal with it but I can't imagine
25:13:00
going to another country where I'm
25:14:00
working through an interpreter and I
25:16:00
know people to do it and it just it's
25:18:00
it's amazing to me to try and convey a
25:21:00
message that way for somebody like
25:25:00
yourself just because you're just trying
25:27:00
to flow information and each time you'd
25:29:00
have to stop or you say okay what did
25:31:00
you say is that right that's right
25:33:00
that's right it could be difficult do
25:36:00
you find and I want to get back on
25:39:00
events of stuff but what do you do now
25:40:00
it's so interesting you find that it's
25:43:00
very paperwork intensive sometimes with
25:46:00
when you go in or um you know I take a
25:52:00
pretty you know I'm not as engineering
25:58:00
minded or technically minded as a lot of
26:01:00
my peers in the industry I take a pretty
26:03:00
practical approach to implementing lean
26:05:00
manufacturing in Twitter perhaps SMI I
26:08:00
think many people in my industry and
26:11:00
I'll probably hear a bunch of flack for
26:13:00
this one here's the podcast but I think
26:15:00
many people in my industry go so far to
26:18:00
the extreme about you have to do it this
26:20:00
this this this you gotta check this box
26:23:00
and you across this T doubt this I that
26:25:00
it turns many people off many people are
26:29:00
scared of Lee manufacturing or going
26:32:00
down this journey or they've gone down
26:35:00
this journey and it was so difficult
26:36:00
because of who they were working with
26:38:00
that that they you know that
26:41:00
they're turned off from it at this point
26:43:00
in time and I really try and you know
26:44:00
there are things that are important that
26:47:00
you do and I and I really see it as this
26:50:00
learning progression as you're you know
26:52:00
as you're getting you know farther down
26:54:00
the journey you know there's more
26:56:00
technical stuff that can come in there's
26:58:00
more processes you can implement but
27:01:00
it's really it doesn't need to be
27:04:00
difficult and and I think that's why I'm
27:08:00
able to work with many different sized
27:09:00
companies and and different types of
27:12:00
companies because I think you know I
27:14:00
take it as a very practical approach you
27:16:00
know very simple yeah is it important
27:19:00
that you have this standardized work and
27:22:00
written out for how this operators
27:24:00
assembling this yeah it's important but
27:28:00
at the same time I don't need you to
27:30:00
spend an hour developing it let's just
27:32:00
jot down some notes on what is the
27:34:00
sequence that we want him to do XYZ
27:37:00
process and let's start there right it
27:40:00
doesn't have to be any more difficult
27:41:00
than that let's see what problems come
27:43:00
from that first before we you know spend
27:46:00
you know hours developing documents and
27:48:00
figuring out how to get it ISO certified
27:50:00
or this event or whatever so so I think
27:52:00
trying to make it practical and simple
27:54:00
and easy for people to understand and
27:57:00
implement is important for especially
28:01:00
the ones that are scared of it
28:03:00
or that aren't you know necessarily
28:07:00
already believers of lean manufacturing
28:09:00
so yeah and that's that's one of the
28:12:00
great reasons where I wanted to have you
28:13:00
on because you know what you do
28:15:00
holistically is take that fear away from
28:20:00
people because one most people don't
28:22:00
they're scared of the word lean they
28:24:00
don't even know what I mean you know not
28:25:00
and it nothing wrong with that they just
28:26:00
haven't looked into it you know the lean
28:28:00
manufacturing all son they're like wow
28:30:00
that means they're gonna lean out the
28:31:00
workforce or they're gonna do yep and
28:32:00
and it's not true it's a as you've been
28:35:00
saying it's you know we're going to
28:37:00
bring it down to where you have six
28:39:00
steps you're only gonna need to do one
28:41:00
step and we're gonna clean that up and
28:42:00
we're gonna see how you're doing things
28:43:00
and and that's one of the things that a
28:46:00
lot of inventors and we'll go back to
28:48:00
the inventor side is when I talk to them
28:50:00
about processes I say the word process
28:53:00
and then just go oh my god you know
28:55:00
I just want to invent things you know so
29:00:00
that that's kind of why I so glad to
29:03:00
have you on that as you said 250 million
29:05:00
dollar company down to hey you're just
29:06:00
starting out you still should be
29:08:00
thinking out whiteboarding what's next
29:11:00
you know and and and that's kind of why
29:13:00
I want to have you on just just to give
29:15:00
those first steps to let people know it
29:17:00
is so important to to be thinking about
29:20:00
previous steps and thinking about the
29:22:00
next step in the next step yeah yeah I
29:24:00
think you know the way that I try and
29:26:00
simplify lean and TPS is is all we're
29:30:00
trying to do there's there's a hundred
29:32:00
tools there's a hundred you know
29:34:00
documents and this and that and jargon
29:36:00
that I could throw around but at the end
29:38:00
of the day what Toyota is trying to do
29:40:00
is make everything a test all right so
29:44:00
what they're trying to do is they're
29:45:00
trying to say hey let's take it you know
29:47:00
to the inventing side of things right so
29:50:00
everything should be a test so I come up
29:53:00
with this first prototype that first
29:56:00
prototype should be a test of where am I
29:59:00
in in terms of costs where am I in terms
30:01:00
of meeting the customer or you need or
30:03:00
the problem that I'm trying to solve
30:04:00
with that customer we're in where am I
30:06:00
in terms of manufacturability
30:08:00
in fact you may only be testing one of
30:09:00
those things you may only be testing am
30:11:00
i meeting the customer need and learn
30:14:00
from it and then go to another test
30:16:00
right another prototype right but
30:19:00
everything that we do should be a test
30:22:00
whether it's I'm working with someone
30:24:00
trying to develop someone as a leader I
30:26:00
give them this challenge of here's what
30:28:00
I want you to do on how to coach this
30:30:00
person I should be thinking about that
30:32:00
in terms of a test and evaluating how
30:34:00
well did they do what did they do what
30:36:00
did they do right what'd they do wrong
30:37:00
and bring you all the way back around to
30:39:00
providing them more coaching so they can
30:41:00
be a better leader the next time so so
30:43:00
if you know your audience is thinking
30:45:00
about well how do I apply lean for what
30:48:00
I'm doing I just want to invent things
30:50:00
my challenge to them was at every step
30:53:00
of the way try and turn it into some
30:55:00
type of test so that you learn something
30:57:00
each step of the way so whether it's the
31:01:00
next prototype whether it's I'm testing
31:04:00
the market on how the name you know if
31:07:00
it's from a brain
31:08:00
Sandpoint I'm testing a logo I'm testing
31:11:00
the manufacturing process everything try
31:15:00
and make it a learning moment so I can
31:17:00
learn you know there's there's a line in
31:19:00
the sand I took it to this point I
31:21:00
tested it I learned from it and now it's
31:23:00
time to go to that next step I think
31:25:00
that's the best way to think of lean and
31:28:00
TPS is just in a series of steps of
31:32:00
learning right that's a great way to
31:35:00
look at it you know a lot of people
31:36:00
including myself as an inventor
31:38:00
we love our products you know you know
31:42:00
this is the greatest thing since sliced
31:43:00
bread and everyone wants it but if I
31:46:00
implement what you just talked about
31:48:00
it's going to tell me if everyone loves
31:50:00
it it's gonna that's right it's gonna
31:53:00
help me if it doesn't work you know so
31:55:00
if just because I love it but having
31:58:00
legitimate testing yes documents are
32:01:00
paper and if you can't do it there's
32:03:00
nothing wrong if you're too emotionally
32:05:00
attached to your product if you can't
32:06:00
see past that as you mentioned earlier
32:09:00
have someone else doing that's right
32:11:00
that's right think of how many stories
32:13:00
we've all heard anyone that's in any
32:15:00
type of involved in entrepreneurism and
32:17:00
inventors of these products that
32:19:00
developed over years and years of years
32:21:00
then finally gets a market no one wants
32:22:00
it I mean I've heard so many stories of
32:26:00
that and it's they never tested along
32:28:00
the way to actually confirm their
32:30:00
hypothesis that this solves this problem
32:32:00
for this cause or here's the price point
32:35:00
that it needs to be for them to buy it
32:36:00
or here's the position from a branding
32:39:00
standpoint they didn't test all those
32:41:00
different assumptions that they were
32:42:00
making and not just test it once but
32:45:00
test it over and over and over and over
32:46:00
and over again along the journey and
32:48:00
they got all the way down to this point
32:49:00
and it's a long hard journey to get
32:53:00
there and realize that man my price
32:55:00
points off for my Manufacturing's off
32:57:00
for you know people wanted it
32:58:00
instantaneously and I now have a six
33:00:00
week lead time or whatever that barrier
33:03:00
is it's a tough lesson to learn you know
33:05:00
two years down the road yeah and and and
33:08:00
you could miss the mark where if you had
33:10:00
tested your product will be ready
33:12:00
remanufactured a lot of times as you
33:14:00
probably find out it might not be for
33:17:00
that that market segment that you
33:19:00
thought when you first start out
33:20:00
definitely find
33:22:00
oh it's for this new group of
33:24:00
individuals and that's why the testing I
33:27:00
love what you said it's so important to
33:29:00
test to make sure that your theories
33:31:00
your hypothesis all right
33:33:00
and there's nothing wrong with me
33:35:00
there's nothing wrong with being wrong
33:37:00
if you find out early that's right
33:40:00
that's right I think it's great I mean
33:43:00
wait what you know I don't think there's
33:45:00
anything wrong with being wrong at all I
33:46:00
think that's that's great right I fit I
33:50:00
love you know I mean it's been used a
33:51:00
hot thousand times before but you know
33:53:00
fail often you know because it's true
33:56:00
because that's where we learn right I'm
33:59:00
expecting people to fail or myself and
34:01:00
my students fail all the time because
34:03:00
that's that moments like all right we
34:05:00
failed all right what do we learn from
34:07:00
this because your next step I want you
34:08:00
to be that much better and that's the
34:10:00
same thing with product development and
34:11:00
in taking products to market you know we
34:15:00
have to we have to go through those
34:16:00
tests and test our own assumptions or
34:18:00
own hypothesis test the market and you
34:21:00
know it's the only way that we can move
34:22:00
forward with some level of verified data
34:26:00
moving forward versus just our heart and
34:30:00
belief that you know this is gonna solve
34:32:00
the world's problems out there once I
34:34:00
get a developed that's not a good that's
34:37:00
not a good path to go down oh and you
34:39:00
want that emotion you want that belief
34:42:00
but you also want that side of logical
34:44:00
that's right come together and they're
34:46:00
done correctly that's when you see these
34:48:00
products that go on the market and you
34:49:00
say wow that was done correctly look at
34:51:00
the packaging it's made at a good price
34:53:00
it's done it can manufacture we can ramp
34:55:00
up manufacturing or whatever it is
34:57:00
because you've done it logically but
34:59:00
you've driven yourself through with that
35:01:00
emotion and it's so important to have
35:03:00
both of them and again as we mentioned
35:05:00
if you can't do it all your own which
35:06:00
most people can't nothing great was done
35:08:00
on their own someone by themselves yeah
35:10:00
some other people on both them on bring
35:12:00
somebody in like yourself someone that
35:14:00
takes that emotion out and is logical
35:16:00
and knowing ok show me oh it works show
35:19:00
me that's right yeah look I love Shark
35:25:00
Tank and I love the fact that they take
35:27:00
all the emotion out of it when during
35:29:00
those conversations right Kevin O'Leary
35:31:00
you know sit there and be like look I
35:33:00
don't care what you just said have you
35:35:00
sold any
35:36:00
right or have you you know does it does
35:38:00
the customer want it right I mean at the
35:40:00
end of the day as much as we love our
35:42:00
products and you said this earlier it's
35:47:00
about actually selling of them it's
35:49:00
about actually taking it to market and
35:51:00
you know meeting some need out there in
35:53:00
the market you know whether it's profit
35:54:00
or non profit but meeting that need and
35:56:00
you know that's that's not an emotional
35:59:00
data point that is just a data point so
36:06:00
we're out of time I want to thank you so
36:09:00
much for being on show today I would
36:10:00
love to have you back on when we'll talk
36:12:00
about like a specific topic because what
36:15:00
you do is so vast and I love hearing
36:18:00
your story and what you're doing is so
36:20:00
cool that that you jumped into this so
36:22:00
long ago when it was first becoming you
36:26:00
know what it is today
36:27:00
sure sure yeah a lot of people as you
36:30:00
know when you probably tell people what
36:32:00
you do they're like are you talking
36:34:00
about what's the United Way and you know
36:36:00
it's it's it's crazy everyone talks
36:39:00
about doing things better doing things
36:40:00
better process it but they don't have
36:41:00
that that foundation that terminology
36:43:00
and it's so cool what you do I think
36:46:00
it's awesome I think you're you're
36:48:00
appreciate that yeah you're pretty brave
36:51:00
to be walking into some of these
36:52:00
companies but you know the good part is
36:54:00
you know what you're doing and that's
36:55:00
what's good about it when you walk into
36:57:00
a company you know they're not gonna
36:57:00
take you to heart when you first get
36:59:00
there but you say if they just stick
37:00:00
with me I know that I'm gonna turn them
37:02:00
around and that's what that's right yeah
37:04:00
you know it's it's fun when you know
37:06:00
when I when you do get the the company
37:08:00
that really embraces it and you're able
37:10:00
to turn around and you know and and get
37:14:00
them to just a completely different spot
37:15:00
in terms of of all different business
37:18:00
aspects it's it's it's pretty great it's
37:20:00
it's a good feeling really cool like I
37:26:00
said man thank you so much for being on
37:27:00
the show today everyone that's listening
37:30:00
out there please we're gonna have
37:32:00
jason's contact information on on our
37:35:00
website on our show notes if you want to
37:37:00
reach out to them you have any questions
37:38:00
about this it would be awesome to reach
37:40:00
out let them know if you can please if
37:43:00
you get a chance to be awesome if you
37:44:00
can go out to itunes of google play
37:46:00
leave the review a rating for our show
37:49:00
let us know
37:50:00
how we're doing and if you want to cover
37:53:00
any topics it would be great for if you
37:55:00
could do that spend a little bit of time
37:56:00
for myself call me disco and for Jason
37:58:00
Burton I thank you for being on today
38:00:00
and we'll catch you next time on the
38:02:00
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38:04:00
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