Create an Efficient Manufacturing Strategy; Jason Burt Talks About His Experience With Toyota’s Production System

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Jason has had the amazing opportunity to be coached and mentored by Toyota on TPS principles for over 19 years, and has continued to learn as a business owner. His career has progressed through many functional areas; operations management, supply management, distribution, logistics, dealerships, engineering, and quality in both commercial and healthcare markets while working for large organizations. In each of these areas, he was able to show high-level results to the business through a balanced strategic focus with a “hands on” day-to-day approach.
Since venturing into the entrepreneurial world, Jason has had the opportunity to work with many fascinating companies and to help them achieve new potential in terms of business strategy and culture development.
Watch the podcast here!
 

Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
hi everyone and welcome to the Venice
0:03
launchpad and network
0:04
I am carmine Dennis Koh your host for
0:07
today's show with me I have a gentleman
0:09
who is an expert in helping people not
0:12
only organize their business run it
0:14
better more proficient and they caught
0:16
lean manufacturing and I think that's
0:19
the term forward his name is Jason
0:20
Burton I have him on a line and he's
0:23
gonna give us some tips tricks some
0:24
hints on how we all could be more
0:26
proficient in probably our business but
0:28
also probably just in our daily lives so
0:30
hey Jason you over there I am Carmen
0:33
thank you very much for having me on the
0:34
show I appreciate it oh no man I'm so
0:37
glad to have you on has actually been
0:38
waiting for this opportunity to talk to
0:40
you cuz I'm one of those guys who I
0:42
think I'm super organized I think I'm
0:43
pretty proficient at when I come to work
0:45
and I do think but there's always always
0:47
room for improvement and I was like
0:50
super glad to have you on because I've
0:52
read some books about me manufacturing I
0:55
read things about that and I was always
0:57
interested in how not only does someone
0:59
get into that but how implementing it
1:02
but I want to back up a little bit
1:04
talked a little bit about you first and
1:06
and tell us a little bit about your
1:08
business your company and and kind of
1:10
how you got into this crazy business so
1:13
lean proficiency or manufacturing is
1:15
that the term lean manufacturing yeah
1:17
it's it is it's a kind of lean
1:20
manufacturing that's probably the most
1:21
common term and really what lean
1:23
manufacturing it's really what
1:27
originally started is the Toyota
1:28
Production system so Toyota actually
1:30
started this many many many years ago
1:32
and as it came over to the US it kind of
1:35
during a very early book and publication
1:38
that came out as lean manufacturing and
1:40
that term has kind of stuck in the u.s.
1:42
for many many years so in the and how I
1:46
got into it I worked at a company called
1:50
herman miller to make office furniture
1:52
for 15 years and i was pretty lucky the
1:57
very early in my career in the mid 90s
2:00
they partnered actually with Toyota
2:02
manufacturing Toyota came in and became
2:06
their consultants to help Herman Miller
2:08
learn about the Toyota Production system
2:10
and lean manufacturing so I was
2:12
fortunate to
2:13
be there during their 15 year transition
2:15
to you know essentially a lien company
2:20
or you know learning and developing the
2:22
Toyota Production system within there
2:24
are four walls and out to their
2:26
dealerships and suppliers so I was a
2:29
part of that journey for many years had
2:31
Toyota directly as my coaches and
2:33
sensei's and eventually let's see I
2:37
think in 2011 I had made so many
2:41
connections in the industry and had so
2:43
many bad many many people calling asked
2:45
me to come consult and help with their
2:47
companies it kind of just teed up as a
2:49
business and I left Herman Miller and
2:52
and started consulting and and haven't
2:54
looked back since so I've been
2:56
consulting since 2011 essentially
3:00
working with companies in any industry
3:02
whether it's startups in early small
3:06
businesses or you know 150 200 million
3:10
dollar companies and everywhere in
3:12
between helping them essentially
3:15
implement lean manufacturing or the
3:17
Toyota Production system within their
3:18
company to be you know increased
3:22
customer satisfaction become more
3:23
efficient you know there's a lot of
3:25
aspects to it but that's essentially
3:26
what I do I work with businesses to help
3:29
them get better
3:30
yeah well that's that's all you know a
3:32
lot of times you and you probably see it
3:35
you make it sound easy like I'm gonna go
3:38
but you're one of those guys that comes
3:41
in and you know most people are scared
3:44
of change and and when you walk into a
3:46
company you know you're probably it's
3:49
you know we talked a little bit before
3:50
we start recording it's it's uh it's a
3:53
scary thing for not only employees but
3:55
also business owners bringing somebody
3:58
on like yourself because they have to
4:00
really face the things they've been
4:02
doing for a long time that maybe aren't
4:04
right but it's nothing wrong with that
4:06
it's just you're there to help them do
4:08
you do you run it too sometimes you you
4:09
know people really getting getting
4:11
pushback from people oh yeah I mean you
4:13
said that correctly in the beginning
4:15
your change is very difficult for
4:16
everyone whether you're at a leadership
4:18
level whether you're you know the people
4:21
putting bolts in the products at all
4:24
levels and meets between changes where
4:27
you
4:27
difficult it's very hard I think it you
4:30
know from it from a leadership
4:31
perspective it's difficult sometimes
4:33
almost from an ego standpoint you know
4:35
I'm the leader I'm the one driving this
4:37
company and for to ask for help is
4:40
difficult for any of us right just human
4:41
nature in general it's hard to ask for
4:43
help
4:43
I think we all have that challenge
4:46
especially when you're put in a position
4:48
of leadership and you're expected to
4:50
have the answer so you know with Toyota
4:52
the Toyota Production system we
4:54
manufacturing leadership is a big part
4:56
of it of being willing to be humble and
4:59
say I don't know and go down this path
5:01
of this journey of learning and then you
5:05
know obviously change is difficult
5:06
throughout the rest of the organization
5:08
because processes are gonna change the
5:10
way they do things you know they've done
5:12
it the same way for 20 years or you know
5:14
whatever that timeline is the processes
5:17
will change and once again I think the
5:19
great thing about lean manufacturing or
5:21
the Toyota Production system is it's
5:23
very people centric it's very focused on
5:26
it's not a you know even though it's
5:28
used in negative context it's not a
5:31
process that comes in and says we're
5:34
here to fire people it's if you're doing
5:37
it the right way if you're truly
5:38
following Toyota the way that they do it
5:39
like I said with every process there's a
5:42
there's people that use it for bad I
5:44
guess you would say you know you use it
5:46
for evil but it's not something where
5:48
you come in and you're here to dis take
5:50
jobs away you're here to actually make
5:52
things better more efficient easier for
5:54
the people that are doing the work more
5:56
ergonomically correct you know trying to
5:59
clarify the processes you know and
6:01
trying to do everything we can if we if
6:03
we can make the jobs easier for everyone
6:04
in the entire company all the way from
6:07
you know the people like I said on the
6:09
shop floor doing the real value add all
6:11
the way up through leadership it's gonna
6:12
make the entire company work better and
6:14
more efficient so that's really the
6:16
approach that I take is based on the
6:17
Toyota Production system and you know
6:19
being very focused on helping the
6:21
employees you know I I totally agree and
6:25
like we said change is very tough but
6:28
how cool is that that you were there at
6:30
the beginning I mean how fortunate to be
6:33
able to learn that process I mean I mean
6:36
it sounds like you took it to heart when
6:38
when they came in like man this is an
6:39
opportunity to really
6:41
learn something that you're gonna be
6:43
able to take with you throughout your
6:44
whole life I mean it's so cool I mean
6:45
Toyota it would that is like the the
6:48
main focus I mean everyone wanted to
6:51
follow what they were doing yeah I kind
6:53
of look at it as like my MBA I don't
6:55
have an MBA but for me that is my you
6:58
know my check it really kind of
7:00
accentuates my career and you know I was
7:03
actually working on the assembly line at
7:05
Herman Miller when they started in 95
7:06
and at that point in time they didn't
7:09
even we didn't even really know what it
7:12
was gonna be what it was about I really
7:14
didn't have any idea but I knew that it
7:16
was a I saw there was an opportunity so
7:18
I raised my hand very quickly you know
7:20
saying I want to get involved and and
7:22
with then you know a couple years I was
7:24
literally you know side by side with to
7:27
the other shoulder to shoulder making
7:28
changes in the process and learning what
7:30
they learn you know what they know so
7:32
yeah I was it was a huge opportunity it
7:35
got to I actually even got to the point
7:37
in 2000 we were trying to advance our
7:41
learning as far as lean manufacturing
7:42
the Toyota Production system and Herman
7:44
Miller stunt meat at Toyota North
7:46
America corporate headquarters and I
7:48
actually became a toy to employee for
7:49
about a year and a half working with
7:51
their consulting group to learn even
7:54
more in depth about the Toyota
7:55
Production system and then bring it back
7:57
to her Miller so I've been very
7:59
fortunate with that whole relationship
8:00
and it has really crafted my whole
8:04
career whether it's you know like you
8:06
mentioned earlier from my daily life and
8:08
how I look at things and solve problems
8:10
and organize myself to you know like I
8:13
said earlier before the show started we
8:15
were talking you know I have some
8:16
products that I'm trying to bring to
8:17
market how I use how I view that process
8:21
as far as the new product development
8:23
process and using a lot of the the lean
8:25
thinking in that process and then
8:28
obviously working with my clients so
8:29
it's really impacted me as a whole and
8:32
both work and you know personal life as
8:35
well so it probably has to like you
8:38
couldn't separate no no not at all not
8:42
at all you know one of the things that
8:44
you know those of us that have been you
8:48
know immersed in Toyota Production
8:50
system Lee manufacturing for a lot of
8:51
years it's kind of a blessing and a
8:53
curse because one of the things
8:54
trained to do is see problems in the
8:57
system see problems in the process so
9:00
you know we kind of joke around because
9:01
everywhere we look everywhere we go
9:03
every company we walk into we see
9:05
nothing but problems right I'm sitting
9:07
in an airport I see nothing but ok
9:09
that's not efficient on how they're
9:11
loading this that's not efficient over
9:12
here or I'm sitting in Starbucks
9:13
watching you know the lineup in the
9:16
backup of people going ok that's not
9:17
efficient all this sir butts over here
9:19
was a lot more efficient because they
9:20
did XYZ it's this constant analysis of
9:24
you're just looking and trying to see
9:25
where the gap is as far as what it
9:27
should be compared to what it you know
9:29
what it currently is today so it's
9:32
definitely impacted every part of my
9:33
life for sure that's really cool in it
9:36
and real quick before before we
9:39
continues that I mean just getting a lot
9:42
of questions in my head to think about
9:43
is that what's that you know ok so one
9:45
of our listeners has to jump off some
9:47
quick contact information or website
9:48
that people can go to sure
9:51
so my consulting website is and it's not
9:54
an easy domain name but it's a hip eh i
9:58
IP consulting.com and we actually you
10:03
know just so that you have it we
10:05
actually created a or creating a landing
10:09
page for your listeners so they can and
10:12
go to it it'll be e hip consulting comm
10:14
forward slash launchpad and they'll be
10:17
able to go on there and download a
10:20
simple little ebook I have connect with
10:23
me and social media and contact me in
10:26
general so nice little place for your
10:29
listeners to go to after the show is
10:31
done so and we'll have all that in our
10:34
show notes too so if you're driving
10:36
don't pull over and bring that down or
10:39
don't try writing it down while you're
10:40
driving one a little little hit there so
10:43
cool so you had mentioned which I didn't
10:46
know this you you're doing some products
10:47
yourself these home goods industrial
10:51
type products yeah so I have two
10:54
products that I've you know it's
10:56
interesting I've been working on it for
10:59
way too long let me just say that you
11:02
know is every inventor right to products
11:06
that I'm bringing to market in in
11:08
it's always interesting as I reflect
11:10
through that process and trying to make
11:12
sure that I'm using my own tools of my
11:15
own coaching in my own process and you
11:18
know I think that helps me work and
11:21
relate with a lot of companies because I
11:22
am trying to use you know what I'm
11:25
preaching or what I'm trying to coach
11:26
others I'm trying to use it myself and
11:28
my own process but yeah the products
11:30
today I'm working on right now one is a
11:33
office furniture product you know I
11:37
mentioned earlier that I travel a lot
11:38
I'm gone most every day working at
11:41
clients it's a product where it helps
11:45
the with security of computer laptop and
11:49
other devices when you're in a public
11:50
space and then I have another product
11:54
that is a fitness equipment product that
11:58
I'm that I'm working on bringing to
11:59
market so a couple different you know
12:01
completely different industries but
12:02
problems that I once again you know I
12:06
see problems problems that I saw
12:08
problems that I experienced that I'm
12:09
trying to solve through product design
12:11
so that's pretty cool
12:13
now as the inventor side of you you
12:18
probably are torn because you want to
12:19
move ahead really fast get their product
12:21
going and you knock him and then the
12:23
other side he was like whoa wait a
12:24
minute we need to go through these steps
12:26
and check it so is that something that
12:28
you're kind of continually fighting with
12:30
yourself about it is because and I think
12:34
the biggest struggle with me is time so
12:37
you know how much do I offload to
12:41
someone versus try and you know manage
12:43
myself and I made in the reason I say
12:45
that both these products have taken way
12:47
too much time it's very early on I'm
12:50
very busy with my consulting business I
12:52
tried to find a partner or a couple
12:57
partners to take it 100% and I wasn't
12:59
involved enough myself and it both the
13:03
products went down pasts it I don't
13:05
think made sense from a development
13:06
standpoint from you know you talked
13:08
earlier on some your other podcasts
13:10
about the whole you know manufacturing
13:11
decisions you know where it's me and who
13:13
your partner with there were a lot of
13:15
decisions that I outsource essentially
13:18
and I shouldn't have and you
13:21
for I was able to really kind of check
13:23
that process and see where I was at it
13:26
kind of went too far down the road so
13:27
you know as I was going through your
13:29
guys's website on the launch pad and
13:31
stuff you know I could see from the
13:33
comments and stuff you're very involved
13:35
with your investment inventors and and
13:37
kind of check-in points and stuff like
13:38
that and and that was just a gap that I
13:40
had so so now I've kind of taken a step
13:43
back and I have a great partner from a
13:46
developments and developer that I'm
13:48
working with a local engineering group
13:50
and I'm you know taking it slow and
13:52
making sure that I have the right
13:54
check-ins at the right time to make sure
13:56
that I'm involved in those critical
13:58
decisions so and that's a great example
14:01
where I wasn't using my own learning
14:03
right you know in Toyota Production
14:04
system it's a very clear process and
14:06
there's there's very clear you know
14:09
check points to confirm quality to
14:11
confirm your meeting you know all the
14:13
needs of the customer whether that be me
14:15
or my end customer that I'm trying to
14:16
design product forum for a night and I
14:19
didn't follow my own teaching I kind of
14:21
hand it off expecting someone else to
14:24
kind of think that way and that was my
14:26
own mistake in my own you know stumble
14:28
along the way so just makes me you know
14:31
this just helps me learn a little bit
14:34
more and be better the next time right
14:35
oh no doubt man hey at least you're
14:38
about it and you know this you caught it
14:41
you had the foresight you had the
14:43
ability you have the knowledge to know
14:45
when it was going the wrong way which is
14:47
man you you get products sometimes that
14:51
have really gone too far
14:53
and we wish they had come to us and and
14:55
and let us reevaluate because sure each
14:58
step is so important for the next step
15:01
and being able as you with your
15:04
knowledge you can foresee that end
15:06
result and you've already worked out how
15:08
to get there
15:09
yeah and you need good people not
15:12
everyone does everything on their own
15:13
when they think you can't do it all by
15:14
your swamp you know so that's why having
15:17
the right people to help and and
15:18
everything every step of the way when
15:20
somebody's coming to us with a product
15:22
we're looking to manufacture it so that
15:25
it can be shipped correctly so that can
15:26
be shipped with low cost I mean each
15:28
step is like a domino effect and that's
15:30
right that you even though it took
15:32
taking you longer when that product
15:34
reaches you you're gonna
15:35
be confident that it was done the
15:37
correct way yeah definitely definitely
15:39
and and I think that's definitely made
15:41
me a better coach in terms of smaller
15:45
businesses most of my clients earlier on
15:47
we're larger entities which you know
15:49
they kind of have the machine right they
15:51
have the machine of all the people doing
15:53
the stuff that they need to do and it
15:55
was difficult sometimes when I work with
15:57
these smaller companies from the
16:01
standpoint that not the the the Toyota
16:03
Production side of it but just me
16:05
understanding all the things that need
16:07
to get done in the multiple hats and a
16:09
lot of us as small business owners where
16:11
so I think it's kind of created to
16:13
Memphis view it means myself as far as
16:15
what does that look like as I'm working
16:17
with a small company that's only ten
16:18
people but you know they've you know
16:20
they're they're still early on in the
16:22
market phase you know what is my
16:24
relationship will look like with them
16:26
and how do i guide them through the
16:27
steps of going from you know ten
16:29
employees to fifty to a hundred and in
16:32
that growth pattern and and how you know
16:35
the product development cycle or taking
16:37
it wherever they're at in the process
16:39
it's just giving me a different
16:40
perspective which is I think a good
16:43
thing definitely yeah I could see that
16:45
happening you know come from ability
16:47
some from a company that's doing 200
16:48
million you come to a company that has
16:50
five employees obviously they can't they
16:52
don't have the resources that the other
16:54
companies hey hey hey we need ten SOPs
16:56
written okay that's right that's really
17:02
want to talk a little bit about that so
17:03
even every inventor not every inventor
17:07
but inventors who want to produce a
17:09
product and start their own business
17:11
some of them want a license which is
17:13
kind of good in a way there should be
17:14
some processes in place but an inventor
17:17
who wants to be a product developer who
17:19
wants to be a product manufacturer and
17:20
then a shipper and logistics and you
17:22
know we all that doesn't steps
17:25
what's great about what you do is you
17:27
can help them with that process
17:29
definitely in our company at first no no
17:32
company starts off - 100 million dollars
17:34
they they have to start off slow and and
17:36
put those processes in place and what
17:38
what you do is not going to do
17:41
everything correctly it's a thousand
17:42
times but if you have most of your
17:44
processes in place and you make an issue
17:46
or there's an error it's very easy to
17:49
recover right because that's right not a
17:52
detrimental problem it can be fixed if
17:54
you do it slowly the right way is that
17:55
something like that you try to go into a
17:58
company and you really you really just
18:00
sit there and you watch and you say okay
18:02
how is each to each of these things done
18:04
yeah especially in that early phase
18:06
right so you know you said it early best
18:08
so you know it's kind of a domino effect
18:10
right every small decision is a domino
18:12
effect in and so many small companies I
18:15
think I say small companies even some of
18:18
the midsize companies that I work with
18:20
don't even know who they want to be when
18:21
they grow up yet you know for example
18:25
you know a company that I worked with in
18:29
the past manufactured everything very
18:32
vertically integrated all the way from
18:34
raw material through you know multiple
18:38
machining and fabrication process to
18:39
assembly for the customer at the end of
18:42
the day when we really looked at their
18:43
business and saw what they were they
18:46
were a design company you know they what
18:48
they're their true differentiation in
18:51
the market was the engineering and
18:53
design and bringing new products to
18:54
market and you know very early on I
18:57
started challenged them so why are you
18:59
doing all this manufacturing yeah and
19:00
I'm an ops guy right I'm a manufacturing
19:02
guy but I was really trying to figure
19:05
out what was what was the the benefit
19:08
that was bringing to them as a company
19:10
and to their end customer and I think
19:13
you know ultimately I think they should
19:16
probably be an assembly company they
19:18
should own kind of that final quality
19:20
you know let's let's make sure that you
19:22
know what we're providing the customer
19:23
is what we want to provide the customer
19:25
in terms of quality reliability and all
19:27
these different things costs but at the
19:30
end of the day do they need to be taking
19:32
this block of metal and and you know
19:34
machining it down to X probably not
19:36
because the value they bring the
19:38
customer is the fact that this product
19:39
is unique in this way compared to the
19:42
competitors so so I think getting
19:45
involved with with these companies early
19:48
on I think you know it's that domino
19:50
effect every one of these decisions and
19:52
you can very easily go down a path that
19:55
takes a lot of energy a lot of resources
19:57
a lot of effort that may not be the
20:00
right thing for the company to that
20:01
point
20:02
and it can be the flip way right it can
20:04
be the opposite way we're a company
20:06
completely outsources all their
20:08
manufacturing it's like you know what
20:09
you should probably be doing this
20:11
because of X Y & Z because of quality
20:14
because it's unique process or because
20:16
of cost or or whatever reason so I think
20:18
every company is unique but I don't know
20:23
that everyone always thinks about you
20:24
know how each decision affects the next
20:27
I guess the best way to put it so yeah
20:29
that's that that's true though it's so
20:31
great that you can go in and work with
20:34
them and if you have I mean if you have
20:36
a company and and upper management that
20:39
are open to change it just must be so
20:41
much easier yeah yeah definitely yeah I
20:44
mean every come every company is
20:46
different as to you know how much
20:50
they're willing to change how much
20:53
they're willing to analyze their company
20:55
as a whole or are we just here to just
20:58
focus on operations are we just here to
21:00
focus on this part over here sometimes
21:03
the the way that I come to companies can
21:07
have an effect on on how much we can I
21:10
do I get hired a lot by equity firms
21:13
that by companies and they'll bring me
21:15
in say hey help this company it doesn't
21:18
necessarily mean that the leadership is
21:20
saying yeah come in and help me right
21:22
you know I was brought in by someone
21:23
else on the outside so every
21:25
relationships different and you know I
21:28
think it's you know me just saying hey
21:31
I'm here to help isn't necessarily you
21:33
know that's sometimes a negative thing
21:35
in a lot of people's eyes but it's
21:36
trying to find that right way that I can
21:38
provide some value and help them get to
21:40
a better position so yeah that's that
21:43
that's interesting I didn't think of it
21:45
like that a company that is being
21:46
acquired or some investment groups or
21:49
thing I could see them really bringing
21:51
you on just for the information hey you
21:54
know go on in there check this company
21:56
out maybe are they open to change can we
21:58
change them do they know what they want
21:59
to be the same thing could be for an
22:02
inventor we get a lot of inventors who
22:04
want to ingest invent products no
22:07
haven't come to grips with just want to
22:10
invent products then why are you going
22:12
to buy yours you're are you trying to
22:13
sell this product you know so how'd it
22:15
good in a way
22:16
a that that your they were having the
22:19
show because we want people to think
22:21
before the think about the process
22:23
before they get too deep into it yeah I
22:26
you know I I just a quick little story I
22:30
went to this company it was a very small
22:32
little company down the road from me and
22:36
this guy headed up for sale and I'm
22:38
always looking for whether it's a
22:40
company that you know my I might have
22:41
interested or my equity firms or
22:43
investment purposes and I walked in this
22:45
company is him his wife and one of the
22:47
guy running the company started talking
22:51
with him about the different products
22:52
and he's got all these new products
22:54
lined up and and eventually we're in
22:57
this conversation and I'm like why
22:58
haven't you taken all these new products
23:00
to market he goes well if I take it to
23:02
market they'll sell and then I'll have
23:04
to make him and I'm he was at a point in
23:07
his time his career where he was
23:08
perfectly comfortable with him his wife
23:10
just sitting there making the handful
23:12
that were selling and he was scared to
23:14
death that oh my gosh if I have to make
23:15
him and actually produce it for my
23:17
customer I don't know what the heck I'm
23:19
gonna do so I find it funny because he
23:21
had probably more clarity about his
23:24
business than a lot of companies that
23:26
are that are selling because he knew the
23:28
repercussions what it was going to take
23:30
to support what the customer what it was
23:32
gonna take to support operations where I
23:35
see companies on the flip side that are
23:37
just selling selling selling selling
23:38
selling or producing or you know
23:41
creating new products and they have no
23:43
idea what its gonna do to them or how
23:46
they're gonna actually handle it on the
23:47
flip side but so yeah it's always
23:51
interesting with all these different
23:52
companies they're all in a different
23:53
spot and they their journey to where
23:58
they are you know how they've gotten
23:59
there and and what their journey is
24:01:00
moving forward is is so unique and they
24:05:00
need to find a new way for each one of
24:07:00
them so when you travel do you travel um
24:11:00
mostly North America US base kind of all
24:14:00
over world most mostly us
24:17:00
I haven't had I've had a few different
24:20:00
clients want me to do some international
24:22:00
stuff but if at all possible I have some
24:25:00
relationships with some other consulting
24:28:00
individuals that I'll I'll use them I
24:30:00
haven't had a big pull internationally I
24:33:00
have enough business here in the US so
24:35:00
that's my main that's my main focus so
24:37:00
yeah I could see that being being a
24:40:00
little bit of an issue obviously going
24:41:00
to some other countries with with just
24:45:00
different customs and different
24:46:00
languages in different ways you'd have
24:47:00
to approach yeah I have enough of that
24:50:00
struggle just in the US where where we
24:53:00
walk in and you know and run you know
24:55:00
Southern California and the entire you
24:57:00
know workforce speaks Spanish and I
24:59:00
don't I'm not bilingual so you know all
25:01:00
of a sudden there's this language
25:02:00
barrier when we're trying to teach or
25:04:00
coach or this and and that's a challenge
25:06:00
in internally in our own country you
25:09:00
know that that there's ways around it
25:11:00
and we deal with it but I can't imagine
25:13:00
going to another country where I'm
25:14:00
working through an interpreter and I
25:16:00
know people to do it and it just it's
25:18:00
it's amazing to me to try and convey a
25:21:00
message that way for somebody like
25:25:00
yourself just because you're just trying
25:27:00
to flow information and each time you'd
25:29:00
have to stop or you say okay what did
25:31:00
you say is that right that's right
25:33:00
that's right it could be difficult do
25:36:00
you find and I want to get back on
25:39:00
events of stuff but what do you do now
25:40:00
it's so interesting you find that it's
25:43:00
very paperwork intensive sometimes with
25:46:00
when you go in or um you know I take a
25:52:00
pretty you know I'm not as engineering
25:58:00
minded or technically minded as a lot of
26:01:00
my peers in the industry I take a pretty
26:03:00
practical approach to implementing lean
26:05:00
manufacturing in Twitter perhaps SMI I
26:08:00
think many people in my industry and
26:11:00
I'll probably hear a bunch of flack for
26:13:00
this one here's the podcast but I think
26:15:00
many people in my industry go so far to
26:18:00
the extreme about you have to do it this
26:20:00
this this this you gotta check this box
26:23:00
and you across this T doubt this I that
26:25:00
it turns many people off many people are
26:29:00
scared of Lee manufacturing or going
26:32:00
down this journey or they've gone down
26:35:00
this journey and it was so difficult
26:36:00
because of who they were working with
26:38:00
that that they you know that
26:41:00
they're turned off from it at this point
26:43:00
in time and I really try and you know
26:44:00
there are things that are important that
26:47:00
you do and I and I really see it as this
26:50:00
learning progression as you're you know
26:52:00
as you're getting you know farther down
26:54:00
the journey you know there's more
26:56:00
technical stuff that can come in there's
26:58:00
more processes you can implement but
27:01:00
it's really it doesn't need to be
27:04:00
difficult and and I think that's why I'm
27:08:00
able to work with many different sized
27:09:00
companies and and different types of
27:12:00
companies because I think you know I
27:14:00
take it as a very practical approach you
27:16:00
know very simple yeah is it important
27:19:00
that you have this standardized work and
27:22:00
written out for how this operators
27:24:00
assembling this yeah it's important but
27:28:00
at the same time I don't need you to
27:30:00
spend an hour developing it let's just
27:32:00
jot down some notes on what is the
27:34:00
sequence that we want him to do XYZ
27:37:00
process and let's start there right it
27:40:00
doesn't have to be any more difficult
27:41:00
than that let's see what problems come
27:43:00
from that first before we you know spend
27:46:00
you know hours developing documents and
27:48:00
figuring out how to get it ISO certified
27:50:00
or this event or whatever so so I think
27:52:00
trying to make it practical and simple
27:54:00
and easy for people to understand and
27:57:00
implement is important for especially
28:01:00
the ones that are scared of it
28:03:00
or that aren't you know necessarily
28:07:00
already believers of lean manufacturing
28:09:00
so yeah and that's that's one of the
28:12:00
great reasons where I wanted to have you
28:13:00
on because you know what you do
28:15:00
holistically is take that fear away from
28:20:00
people because one most people don't
28:22:00
they're scared of the word lean they
28:24:00
don't even know what I mean you know not
28:25:00
and it nothing wrong with that they just
28:26:00
haven't looked into it you know the lean
28:28:00
manufacturing all son they're like wow
28:30:00
that means they're gonna lean out the
28:31:00
workforce or they're gonna do yep and
28:32:00
and it's not true it's a as you've been
28:35:00
saying it's you know we're going to
28:37:00
bring it down to where you have six
28:39:00
steps you're only gonna need to do one
28:41:00
step and we're gonna clean that up and
28:42:00
we're gonna see how you're doing things
28:43:00
and and that's one of the things that a
28:46:00
lot of inventors and we'll go back to
28:48:00
the inventor side is when I talk to them
28:50:00
about processes I say the word process
28:53:00
and then just go oh my god you know
28:55:00
I just want to invent things you know so
29:00:00
that that's kind of why I so glad to
29:03:00
have you on that as you said 250 million
29:05:00
dollar company down to hey you're just
29:06:00
starting out you still should be
29:08:00
thinking out whiteboarding what's next
29:11:00
you know and and and that's kind of why
29:13:00
I want to have you on just just to give
29:15:00
those first steps to let people know it
29:17:00
is so important to to be thinking about
29:20:00
previous steps and thinking about the
29:22:00
next step in the next step yeah yeah I
29:24:00
think you know the way that I try and
29:26:00
simplify lean and TPS is is all we're
29:30:00
trying to do there's there's a hundred
29:32:00
tools there's a hundred you know
29:34:00
documents and this and that and jargon
29:36:00
that I could throw around but at the end
29:38:00
of the day what Toyota is trying to do
29:40:00
is make everything a test all right so
29:44:00
what they're trying to do is they're
29:45:00
trying to say hey let's take it you know
29:47:00
to the inventing side of things right so
29:50:00
everything should be a test so I come up
29:53:00
with this first prototype that first
29:56:00
prototype should be a test of where am I
29:59:00
in in terms of costs where am I in terms
30:01:00
of meeting the customer or you need or
30:03:00
the problem that I'm trying to solve
30:04:00
with that customer we're in where am I
30:06:00
in terms of manufacturability
30:08:00
in fact you may only be testing one of
30:09:00
those things you may only be testing am
30:11:00
i meeting the customer need and learn
30:14:00
from it and then go to another test
30:16:00
right another prototype right but
30:19:00
everything that we do should be a test
30:22:00
whether it's I'm working with someone
30:24:00
trying to develop someone as a leader I
30:26:00
give them this challenge of here's what
30:28:00
I want you to do on how to coach this
30:30:00
person I should be thinking about that
30:32:00
in terms of a test and evaluating how
30:34:00
well did they do what did they do what
30:36:00
did they do right what'd they do wrong
30:37:00
and bring you all the way back around to
30:39:00
providing them more coaching so they can
30:41:00
be a better leader the next time so so
30:43:00
if you know your audience is thinking
30:45:00
about well how do I apply lean for what
30:48:00
I'm doing I just want to invent things
30:50:00
my challenge to them was at every step
30:53:00
of the way try and turn it into some
30:55:00
type of test so that you learn something
30:57:00
each step of the way so whether it's the
31:01:00
next prototype whether it's I'm testing
31:04:00
the market on how the name you know if
31:07:00
it's from a brain
31:08:00
Sandpoint I'm testing a logo I'm testing
31:11:00
the manufacturing process everything try
31:15:00
and make it a learning moment so I can
31:17:00
learn you know there's there's a line in
31:19:00
the sand I took it to this point I
31:21:00
tested it I learned from it and now it's
31:23:00
time to go to that next step I think
31:25:00
that's the best way to think of lean and
31:28:00
TPS is just in a series of steps of
31:32:00
learning right that's a great way to
31:35:00
look at it you know a lot of people
31:36:00
including myself as an inventor
31:38:00
we love our products you know you know
31:42:00
this is the greatest thing since sliced
31:43:00
bread and everyone wants it but if I
31:46:00
implement what you just talked about
31:48:00
it's going to tell me if everyone loves
31:50:00
it it's gonna that's right it's gonna
31:53:00
help me if it doesn't work you know so
31:55:00
if just because I love it but having
31:58:00
legitimate testing yes documents are
32:01:00
paper and if you can't do it there's
32:03:00
nothing wrong if you're too emotionally
32:05:00
attached to your product if you can't
32:06:00
see past that as you mentioned earlier
32:09:00
have someone else doing that's right
32:11:00
that's right think of how many stories
32:13:00
we've all heard anyone that's in any
32:15:00
type of involved in entrepreneurism and
32:17:00
inventors of these products that
32:19:00
developed over years and years of years
32:21:00
then finally gets a market no one wants
32:22:00
it I mean I've heard so many stories of
32:26:00
that and it's they never tested along
32:28:00
the way to actually confirm their
32:30:00
hypothesis that this solves this problem
32:32:00
for this cause or here's the price point
32:35:00
that it needs to be for them to buy it
32:36:00
or here's the position from a branding
32:39:00
standpoint they didn't test all those
32:41:00
different assumptions that they were
32:42:00
making and not just test it once but
32:45:00
test it over and over and over and over
32:46:00
and over again along the journey and
32:48:00
they got all the way down to this point
32:49:00
and it's a long hard journey to get
32:53:00
there and realize that man my price
32:55:00
points off for my Manufacturing's off
32:57:00
for you know people wanted it
32:58:00
instantaneously and I now have a six
33:00:00
week lead time or whatever that barrier
33:03:00
is it's a tough lesson to learn you know
33:05:00
two years down the road yeah and and and
33:08:00
you could miss the mark where if you had
33:10:00
tested your product will be ready
33:12:00
remanufactured a lot of times as you
33:14:00
probably find out it might not be for
33:17:00
that that market segment that you
33:19:00
thought when you first start out
33:20:00
definitely find
33:22:00
oh it's for this new group of
33:24:00
individuals and that's why the testing I
33:27:00
love what you said it's so important to
33:29:00
test to make sure that your theories
33:31:00
your hypothesis all right
33:33:00
and there's nothing wrong with me
33:35:00
there's nothing wrong with being wrong
33:37:00
if you find out early that's right
33:40:00
that's right I think it's great I mean
33:43:00
wait what you know I don't think there's
33:45:00
anything wrong with being wrong at all I
33:46:00
think that's that's great right I fit I
33:50:00
love you know I mean it's been used a
33:51:00
hot thousand times before but you know
33:53:00
fail often you know because it's true
33:56:00
because that's where we learn right I'm
33:59:00
expecting people to fail or myself and
34:01:00
my students fail all the time because
34:03:00
that's that moments like all right we
34:05:00
failed all right what do we learn from
34:07:00
this because your next step I want you
34:08:00
to be that much better and that's the
34:10:00
same thing with product development and
34:11:00
in taking products to market you know we
34:15:00
have to we have to go through those
34:16:00
tests and test our own assumptions or
34:18:00
own hypothesis test the market and you
34:21:00
know it's the only way that we can move
34:22:00
forward with some level of verified data
34:26:00
moving forward versus just our heart and
34:30:00
belief that you know this is gonna solve
34:32:00
the world's problems out there once I
34:34:00
get a developed that's not a good that's
34:37:00
not a good path to go down oh and you
34:39:00
want that emotion you want that belief
34:42:00
but you also want that side of logical
34:44:00
that's right come together and they're
34:46:00
done correctly that's when you see these
34:48:00
products that go on the market and you
34:49:00
say wow that was done correctly look at
34:51:00
the packaging it's made at a good price
34:53:00
it's done it can manufacture we can ramp
34:55:00
up manufacturing or whatever it is
34:57:00
because you've done it logically but
34:59:00
you've driven yourself through with that
35:01:00
emotion and it's so important to have
35:03:00
both of them and again as we mentioned
35:05:00
if you can't do it all your own which
35:06:00
most people can't nothing great was done
35:08:00
on their own someone by themselves yeah
35:10:00
some other people on both them on bring
35:12:00
somebody in like yourself someone that
35:14:00
takes that emotion out and is logical
35:16:00
and knowing ok show me oh it works show
35:19:00
me that's right yeah look I love Shark
35:25:00
Tank and I love the fact that they take
35:27:00
all the emotion out of it when during
35:29:00
those conversations right Kevin O'Leary
35:31:00
you know sit there and be like look I
35:33:00
don't care what you just said have you
35:35:00
sold any
35:36:00
right or have you you know does it does
35:38:00
the customer want it right I mean at the
35:40:00
end of the day as much as we love our
35:42:00
products and you said this earlier it's
35:47:00
about actually selling of them it's
35:49:00
about actually taking it to market and
35:51:00
you know meeting some need out there in
35:53:00
the market you know whether it's profit
35:54:00
or non profit but meeting that need and
35:56:00
you know that's that's not an emotional
35:59:00
data point that is just a data point so
36:06:00
we're out of time I want to thank you so
36:09:00
much for being on show today I would
36:10:00
love to have you back on when we'll talk
36:12:00
about like a specific topic because what
36:15:00
you do is so vast and I love hearing
36:18:00
your story and what you're doing is so
36:20:00
cool that that you jumped into this so
36:22:00
long ago when it was first becoming you
36:26:00
know what it is today
36:27:00
sure sure yeah a lot of people as you
36:30:00
know when you probably tell people what
36:32:00
you do they're like are you talking
36:34:00
about what's the United Way and you know
36:36:00
it's it's it's crazy everyone talks
36:39:00
about doing things better doing things
36:40:00
better process it but they don't have
36:41:00
that that foundation that terminology
36:43:00
and it's so cool what you do I think
36:46:00
it's awesome I think you're you're
36:48:00
appreciate that yeah you're pretty brave
36:51:00
to be walking into some of these
36:52:00
companies but you know the good part is
36:54:00
you know what you're doing and that's
36:55:00
what's good about it when you walk into
36:57:00
a company you know they're not gonna
36:57:00
take you to heart when you first get
36:59:00
there but you say if they just stick
37:00:00
with me I know that I'm gonna turn them
37:02:00
around and that's what that's right yeah
37:04:00
you know it's it's fun when you know
37:06:00
when I when you do get the the company
37:08:00
that really embraces it and you're able
37:10:00
to turn around and you know and and get
37:14:00
them to just a completely different spot
37:15:00
in terms of of all different business
37:18:00
aspects it's it's it's pretty great it's
37:20:00
it's a good feeling really cool like I
37:26:00
said man thank you so much for being on
37:27:00
the show today everyone that's listening
37:30:00
out there please we're gonna have
37:32:00
jason's contact information on on our
37:35:00
website on our show notes if you want to
37:37:00
reach out to them you have any questions
37:38:00
about this it would be awesome to reach
37:40:00
out let them know if you can please if
37:43:00
you get a chance to be awesome if you
37:44:00
can go out to itunes of google play
37:46:00
leave the review a rating for our show
37:49:00
let us know
37:50:00
how we're doing and if you want to cover
37:53:00
any topics it would be great for if you
37:55:00
could do that spend a little bit of time
37:56:00
for myself call me disco and for Jason
37:58:00
Burton I thank you for being on today
38:00:00
and we'll catch you next time on the
38:02:00
inventors Launchpad Network you all take
38:04:00
care