SockDock8
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Correctly Developing Drawings for Your Patent
February 28, 2018

Alicia Waldner is the Co-Founder of ADventure marketing. Originally from Middletown Connecticut she transferred to UT her sophomore year. Alicia says going to school in a growing city has created the foundation for everything she’s been able to accomplish now and will continue accomplishing. Her passion is marketing and building her business as well as helping others.
www.adventuremarketinginc.com
The Inventors Launchpad – Roadmap to Success Series is presented by Inventors Launchpad in beautiful Tampa Bay, FL and hosted by Carmine Denisco. Carmine is an accomplished Author, Entrepreneur, Inventor and Co-founder/Managing Partner of Inventors Launchpad. Along with his business partner Rick Valderrama has changed the face of the invention industry and look forward to helping inventors from all over the world move their ideas forward.

Watch the podcast here!

 

Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
excellent so rollin thank you so much
0:03
this morning for stopping by the show I
0:06
know you just got out to stage we're
0:08
here at this beautiful facility here in
0:10
Tampa Florida University of Tampa um you
0:13
know HSN is putting on an Academy to
0:15
help inventors you know bring their
0:17
products to market and obviously HSN can
0:19
benefit if they get some good products
0:21
but they're also it's what's great about
0:22
what I love HSN doing and quirky
0:23
sponsoring is that they're not you know
0:25
pushing to give me your products they're
0:27
just we were trying to help inventors by
0:28
educating yeah whether their product
0:30
goes HSN or goes to a store shelf or
0:33
Bocek working for licensing you know
0:34
they're not really pushing it I think
0:36
it's great and I know you just got off
0:37
the stage and what are you getting from
0:39
the fuel of the inventors out there I
0:40
mean there's some great products out
0:41
there they're emotional it was really
0:43
interesting I mean people were jumping
0:44
in with questions the one I think that
0:46
naming was a big area that people we're
0:48
talking about you know do they have the
0:50
right name are they describing your
0:51
product and in the right way and many
0:54
questions are on that many questions
0:55
also and if they're going to the right
0:56
audience you know are they reaching the
0:58
right people what is the audience
0:59
they're going to and is the name in the
1:00
description of the brand really meet
1:02
that audience that makes sense a lot of
1:04
the questions even afterwards people you
1:07
know people say like oh I came up with
1:08
this name and it's meant to do this but
1:10
those go together and a lot of questions
1:11
there but I also is really surprised one
1:14
of the big messages was being Purpose
1:16
Driven
1:16
so how to be able to create brands and
1:19
you know that means like more than just
1:21
the product and really becomes an is
1:22
about somebody's life and where they're
1:24
going and having a shared value and I
1:27
didn't expect how many people in the
1:29
audience had products that were Purpose
1:31
Driven one that where money went back to
1:33
charity another one that was very you
1:35
know to they were very focused on
1:36
sustainability another one though is you
1:38
know it's very interesting how many of
1:40
these brands are taking a bigger idea
1:42
and that's like just the product itself
1:44
so it really has a social good or
1:46
something that has a bigger kind of a
1:47
purpose to it that connects to people so
1:50
a lot of questions on that so I think
1:51
that the vibe is amazing the energy in
1:53
the room is fantastic and clearly it's
1:55
been some great conversations as well I
1:57
mean you got majorly a standing ovation
1:58
and he's not kidding when I went to grab
2:00
rolling to do this interview all you
2:02
listeners I mean he had a line of people
2:04
that came out I mean I had to interrupt
2:06
them and I know there you're actually
2:07
still waiting outside the booth right
2:09
now to talk to him so I don't know how
2:11
I'm gonna
2:11
come out you know but it's so funny
2:12
because you must have really touched
2:14
because I believe and I and it seems
2:16
like you obviously you're an expert in
2:18
this but branding the name the packaging
2:20
really designing something around your
2:22
product is super important for people
2:25
and your clients and your customers to
2:27
connect yeah one of the things we talk
2:29
about is in the presentation is that
2:33
design should be something that isn't
2:34
just a lost cost we saying that you
2:36
invest in because it comes back you know
2:37
and it really ends up moving your
2:39
product forward so we looked at very
2:40
simple designs we looked at things that
2:42
are very simple and clean you know for
2:43
the Apple or whatnot and then the more
2:45
kind of illustrative and kind of chaotic
2:47
like Casper you know the mattress
2:49
company we looked at that and I mean it
2:51
was trying to able to tell people that
2:52
needs to connect to the product of the
2:53
product look and the identity look need
2:55
to match that the that needs to connect
2:58
to the narrative as well so how do you
2:59
tell the larger story those three things
3:00
need to be the same I think the biggest
3:02
challenge that inventors have is being
3:04
consistent they're always improving and
3:05
they're going to change but you know
3:06
they're doing but their identity and the
3:09
way they design things in the package
3:11
and these meeting system people need to
3:12
always see the same thing so you need to
3:13
kind of keep that message the same over
3:15
and over and over just like you know in
3:17
the in politics you say the same line in
3:19
your stump speech everywhere you go they
3:21
need to do the same thing you know tag
3:24
lines or logos for large brands are
3:26
always the same so at some point need to
3:27
just keep hammering the same story in
3:29
the hammering the same look yeah you
3:31
kind of hit out ahead of you as you were
3:32
saying that I'm going well inventors are
3:33
always changing their products you know
3:34
but having the same you know message the
3:37
same packaging the same look to see yeah
3:39
it's funny just even the conversations
3:41
on the way here everything I could
3:43
change my name and I was really
3:44
interested in that one I'm glad that
3:45
they were open be able to think it
3:47
doesn't think about it unhappy to be
3:48
able to help them on a new name but they
3:50
also have to lock it in at some point
3:52
and just own it you know and and then
3:54
being consistent and you can do things
3:55
we're changing the campaign or the
3:57
narrative or the way you bring it to
3:59
life but you need to be able to make
4:00
those things consistent I think a lot
4:01
for inventors or entrepreneurs when
4:03
they're starting out because you're
4:04
constantly changing you know and kind of
4:06
tweaking things a little bit some point
4:07
needs to decide what your identity
4:08
system is and what your brand stands for
4:10
yeah you have to have that it just seems
4:13
like you know transition from the 60s
4:15
and 70s Eames like now everybody wants
4:17
to when they buy a product they want it
4:19
to be a part of something
4:21
yeah and that's sort of where that that
4:22
purpose side goes I mean I was
4:24
you have awareness of how you get your
4:26
your name out there you have
4:27
consideration how to decide if it's you
4:28
but it's not a purchase that points
4:30
engagement you know you have loyalty in
4:32
a way that people become loyal to a
4:33
product those products that I absolutely
4:34
love at home and I want to be on a
4:36
journey with that product it's not
4:37
because I just bought it and it's done
4:38
I keep hearing how they're improving it
4:40
how they're changing it what the
4:41
inventor what the you know or
4:42
entrepreneur what they what their value
4:45
system is so I think the people really
4:46
want to have an experience and connect
4:48
to that experience more than they
4:50
necessarily just buy a product you know
4:52
you see a little bit more transactional
4:53
and now I think it's about engagement
4:55
it's about the way that your product and
4:57
your customers life meet where do they
4:59
comes again and it kind of relates into
5:01
future sales or that product obviously
5:04
when you bring those clients in right I
5:05
mean you're you're becoming part of you
5:07
know I'm used to using these firms like
5:08
a tribe or your followers or whatever
5:10
exactly and I think that when you're
5:12
doing that you have a chance you talk a
5:14
lot about this of creating a new
5:15
category so one of the things we don't
5:18
think about anymore a detergent you know
5:19
the word detergent was created by tide
5:21
in the 1950s created you know again so
5:23
synthetic and now it's just about the
5:25
generic name so it begins as a movement
5:27
you know and it begins the science like
5:29
detergent is new and eventually gets
5:31
bigger and bigger it sounds just a
5:32
common term that's how these things go
5:33
it begins the same way you get a unique
5:35
experience a unique name a unique
5:37
category that you're in and hopefully at
5:39
Grossman you know we all be so lucky to
5:41
invent attire but as interesting so you
5:44
think detergent like a Kleenex for
5:46
cyclists is like the regular word
5:47
generic word that's reused for every I
5:49
even I did not know that yeah so
5:51
detergent yeah detergent is a synthetic
5:54
soap is organic they ones built to make
5:56
it clear that they were something
5:56
different than you want to compete
5:57
against soap detergent yeah so so for
6:00
the listeners I mean the product is
6:02
super important it has to work it has to
6:03
deliver yes but that brand that
6:05
packaging that yeah that message is
6:08
super important the identity so the
6:09
identity you have a logo you have your
6:12
style your colors the packaging and that
6:16
needs to be the same everywhere so your
6:18
logo needs to look the same as on your
6:19
website on your packaging
6:20
and keep it simple it needs to be able
6:22
to size how lot of different ways your
6:24
color guide you know and what your
6:25
colors are need to stay the same you
6:27
know keep that's consistent so that's
6:29
kind of your identity the second part is
6:31
your narrative your campaign how you
6:32
bring it to life how you tell the story
6:34
that's not lessen your identity that's
6:36
something else
6:37
be consistent you know repeat it over
6:39
and over and over and it may get tiring
6:40
but it's one of the things just like a
6:42
politician you gotta go tell that story
6:43
every single time you meet somebody and
6:45
you know and then the last thing is out
6:47
why do you exist why do you matter in
6:49
the world what is you why is it this
6:50
here that's that purpose yeah that
6:52
existential reason for being people have
6:54
such choices now yeah they can buy they
6:56
can go in a store they can buy online
6:57
but there's so many choices of the
6:59
products and everything you want them to
7:01
believe in your product you want them to
7:02
be a follower you want them to say it
7:04
works for me but they're doing something
7:05
extra that's right and I think that that
7:07
it's funny because people now they don't
7:09
buy things they buy experience right so
7:12
they want let's drive I like miles with
7:16
airlines you know I don't want miles I
7:17
want a vacation you know that's a solo
7:19
vacation don't sell the miles right you
7:21
know so I think if we're inventors it's
7:23
you can sell we talked about this in the
7:24
presentation but you can sell the
7:26
outcome what does the outcome of your
7:27
product honestly the feature of the
7:29
product you have a feature that's truly
7:30
different than great so that feature but
7:32
a lot of people end up selling the same
7:33
feature and they end up in what's called
7:35
sort of a sea of sameness you know it's
7:37
like nerve everybody saying the same
7:38
thing so maybe so the outcome what is it
7:40
like for people when they use that
7:41
product yeah yeah you and everyone and
7:44
you you're probably you're an expert
7:46
this everyone can figure out a way for
7:48
them to stand out right I mean to find
7:51
that niche yeah and those people just
7:53
because I had a lot of inventors that we
7:55
talked to and you probably run into they
7:57
say my products for everyone yeah
7:59
everyone like you're a big trouble then
8:01
if it's very well I know is funny
8:02
because a lot of the questions that did
8:03
come up at a sex which audience are you
8:05
going to you know like and and you may
8:07
want to you know have campaigns campaign
8:09
to a specific group but you have to own
8:11
something and housing that's ownable and
8:13
can't become generic in that way or you
8:15
know saying you can't bring a fight
8:17
against people were spending that much
8:18
money on media we talked about Geico you
8:20
know guy husband's we loved everybody
8:22
knows the promise that they're making in
8:24
the brand promise
8:24
they spend 1.3 billion dollars a year on
8:26
marketing you know so you're not gonna
8:28
beat that sort of company on that so
8:29
you're to have to be better in the way
8:31
you describe it and create more of an
8:32
emotional connection how are you that
8:34
was your brand of inspiring people you
8:36
know and giving them a sense that this
8:38
is really different yeah yeah I mean
8:40
that's exactly right and that's what the
8:42
inventors needed they have a great
8:43
product they are they're doing it they
8:45
they're putting their blood sweat or
8:47
tears or resources into it but then they
8:49
run into that where they
8:50
and they need somebody help them in this
8:52
case I think in this category what
8:54
you're talking about
8:55
really unless you're a brand expert I
8:58
mean it's a moat I think it's the most
8:59
important part your product is important
9:01
yeah I think that branding in the
9:03
packaging and all that is so it is and
9:05
that's why I think you should and it's
9:07
worthwhile investing that's not be huge
9:08
yeah I decide to be able to get some
9:10
somehow from naming to the identity look
9:13
and feel to how you really get to go in
9:15
campaign and get that out there so we
9:17
talked a lot about like using Facebook
9:19
and digital events as well but to put
9:21
those together you may want a little
9:22
help on being able to do the the design
9:24
and but also make sure that it's true to
9:27
use we talked about being able to put up
9:29
the images that you think of as the
9:30
inventor what is it that why is it
9:32
important to you so don't let the
9:34
identity get so far away from you that
9:35
it doesn't speak back to your world and
9:37
where you come from us but what does it
9:39
feel like it's really coming from that
9:40
person because a lot of ways you're the
9:42
spokesperson you're the person who's
9:43
good at that's so important to that and
9:45
make sure that's true to you but at the
9:46
same time needs to be clear and to be
9:48
simple and he's be well designed ya know
9:50
and I like what you said is that you
9:51
know be emotional with it but also be
9:53
open the changes because they both have
9:56
to clip and we also talked about going
10:00
and listening to your customers you know
10:01
your product is one moment and literally
10:07
take a piece of paper draw from a.m. to
10:08
p.m. left to right and write all the
10:10
things that your customer does go and
10:12
watch them what do they do talk to them
10:13
what do they you know do they care about
10:15
wasn't a promise they care about what do
10:17
they do for their job what are they
10:18
where they go what sort of movies do
10:19
they see you know start having more
10:21
empathy for them and then once you see
10:23
that you see the world that they live in
10:24
maybe your product can expand a little
10:26
bit more and tell a bigger story there
10:27
so don't just think about that moment of
10:29
purchase or the moment that they're
10:30
using it because if you do that you're
10:32
really defining just that one little
10:33
tiny moment in the day that they think
10:35
about you what's the bigger picture
10:36
what's that journey that you're on
10:38
together with them and try to capture it
10:40
there we talk to a lot of pet products
10:41
and so you know you could sell the
10:43
moment that your pet eats but what if
10:45
you sell there you know if your talk
10:46
about their health over time you know a
10:47
lot of ways you can tell a bigger story
10:48
yeah yeah and it's it's funny to me
10:52
because it sounds like you're describing
10:53
like a living thing yeah you know it's
10:55
constantly growing in keene great way to
10:57
put it yeah no it's a great way to put
10:59
it
10:59
living brands in the way that things are
11:01
in a journey that they're on and
11:03
experiences it is living this reason why
11:04
it's not just a linear path of hate when
11:07
you found out about your product they
11:08
consider it and they bought it and
11:09
you're done I think if you do that
11:10
you've missed a whole moment of
11:12
engagement and loyalty and the way that
11:13
somebody can actually really be a part
11:15
of that story ongoing yeah that's that's
11:18
good let's I mean I you know I don't I
11:19
know you're busy we only got a few
11:20
minutes what's going on with you what's
11:22
uh what's happening what company you
11:23
work I know you got so much going on but
11:25
what give us a little bit of what's
11:26
happening I work for a firm called
11:28
torneo we're a global CEO advisory firm
11:30
I run design and innovation there
11:34
tane oh very interesting we work with
11:36
70% of the Fortune 100 and I know a
11:38
fortune 100 and fortune 500 CEOs define
11:41
their brands articulate with how they
11:43
get to their customer and design better
11:45
products did you say 70% that's those
11:50
small no that's great yeah we so we and
11:53
it's a relatively young company I joined
11:56
three years ago but it's about six years
11:58
old now and the company and it's grown
12:01
tremendously and part of it I could say
12:02
and I didn't come up with the brand but
12:05
it's because they have a very clear
12:06
offer they talk to the CEO we talked to
12:08
the CEO and we talk to the CEO uniquely
12:11
yeah
12:12
that communication yeah is so important
12:14
yeah we know and so our brand is about
12:16
meeting the need of the CEO and that's
12:19
where I think we've done furloughs unmet
12:21
need they're you know it's oh yeah so
12:23
today Oh is is where I met and there for
12:25
the last three years and get to work on
12:27
amazing clients there yeah well you
12:29
don't be I know you're being pretty
12:30
modest but and and you know I did not
12:32
before the cop before our conversation I
12:34
read up a little bit about you and I
12:35
think you're doing some awesome work
12:36
some cool stuff and in today I mean to
12:40
have 7% and and that's a good market to
12:42
be in the Fortune 100 well we would we
12:45
look at large brands and the challenges
12:46
that large brands are going through but
12:48
actually you know it's funny except
12:49
preparing for this it's the same thing
12:51
that founders go through you know the
12:53
way people are consuming information has
12:54
changed technology social media people
12:58
are changing their cultural values very
13:00
quickly like that rate of change is
13:01
happening much faster
13:02
there's geopolitical and political
13:04
uncertainty like where things going sure
13:06
all these things are making a very you
13:08
know
13:09
a very difficult plan for large
13:11
companies but also for founders coming
13:13
in there's not a simple playbook anymore
13:14
to be able to say hey you know what you
13:16
do you go buy a whole bunch of
13:17
advertising you repeat that message over
13:19
and over and we're gonna buy it doesn't
13:20
work that way anymore you got to come up
13:21
with new ways to build to reach people
13:23
new ways to talk to them so and that's
13:25
what video large fortune 100 companies
13:27
are dealing with and also what small
13:29
entrepreneurs dealing with as well or
13:30
the startups entrepreneur which I've
13:32
been as well in the past went for me to
13:34
last four years that I've been in well I
13:39
mean and again it's it's just it's just
13:40
it's just a scale you know you know
13:42
founders 1 1 2 employees up to hundreds
13:45
and thousands of coins it's still the
13:46
same customer who's buying it at the end
13:48
so it's still one person who's making a
13:50
decision if they're buying a car if
13:51
they're buying you know they're going to
13:54
a restaurant if they're buying a service
13:56
and entrepreneurs still selling some so
13:58
the nice thing is that it's a very level
13:59
playing field so one to one but are big
14:01
that you know you may have a bigger
14:02
company has more resources but so long
14:04
customer who makes one decision to be
14:05
able to do it so if you I think the more
14:07
that you listen to your customer the
14:08
more that you have empathetic for where
14:10
they're sitting and how to be able to
14:12
put and not just think about yourself in
14:13
your own product but what does it fit in
14:14
their world the better that you're going
14:16
to do yeah it's awesome well Roland I
14:18
know that you're gonna be heading back
14:19
you're doing some more talk with some
14:21
more inventors here in Tampa you're
14:23
gonna be heading back to New York you
14:25
survived the cold weather up there that
14:27
was funny actually coming down I was a
14:29
50° when I left there and 50 degrees
14:31
when they came here you know but well
14:37
New York is it's such a great place to
14:40
go and live I mean it's just so fast
14:42
moving in so much fun you know you just
14:45
gotta get used to a chronic I love the
14:46
energy I thrive on the energy and yeah
14:48
in New York when we're right in the
14:49
middle of it and and I love that a lot
14:51
of travel for so you know but every
14:55
single time I fly back into New York I
14:56
get that buzz energy again you know yeah
14:59
and so I love yeah that's great that's
15:02
great Justin just in case some people
15:04
some more listeners might have a
15:05
question for you how can they get in
15:06
touch with your social media stuff
15:08
social media is great so they have more
15:10
than I'm on Twitter it's just at Roland
15:11
Hobbs and my names are the W sorrow WLAN
15:14
Diaz that's probably the best place to
15:15
be able to follow me and then happy to
15:17
chat with people there perfect well Ron
15:20
thank you for stopping by the studio
15:21
today or
15:22
we appreciate everything you're doing
15:24
for inventors we'll be watching you
15:26
because some great stuff going on and
15:28
we'll we'll forward any questions that
15:30
we get over to you yeah and again thanks
15:33
for stopping by and we'll talk to you
15:34
soon
15:34
yeah no thank you all right buddy
excellent so rollin thank you so much
0:03
this morning for stopping by the show I
0:06
know you just got out to stage we're
0:08
here at this beautiful facility here in
0:10
Tampa Florida University of Tampa um you
0:13
know HSN is putting on an Academy to
0:15
help inventors you know bring their
0:17
products to market and obviously HSN can
0:19
benefit if they get some good products
0:21
but they're also it's what's great about
0:22
what I love HSN doing and quirky
0:23
sponsoring is that they're not you know
0:25
pushing to give me your products they're
0:27
just we were trying to help inventors by
0:28
educating yeah whether their product
0:30
goes HSN or goes to a store shelf or
0:33
Bocek working for licensing you know
0:34
they're not really pushing it I think
0:36
it's great and I know you just got off
0:37
the stage and what are you getting from
0:39
the fuel of the inventors out there I
0:40
mean there's some great products out
0:41
there they're emotional it was really
0:43
interesting I mean people were jumping
0:44
in with questions the one I think that
0:46
naming was a big area that people we're
0:48
talking about you know do they have the
0:50
right name are they describing your
0:51
product and in the right way and many
0:54
questions are on that many questions
0:55
also and if they're going to the right
0:56
audience you know are they reaching the
0:58
right people what is the audience
0:59
they're going to and is the name in the
1:00
description of the brand really meet
1:02
that audience that makes sense a lot of
1:04
the questions even afterwards people you
1:07
know people say like oh I came up with
1:08
this name and it's meant to do this but
1:10
those go together and a lot of questions
1:11
there but I also is really surprised one
1:14
of the big messages was being Purpose
1:16
Driven
1:16
so how to be able to create brands and
1:19
you know that means like more than just
1:21
the product and really becomes an is
1:22
about somebody's life and where they're
1:24
going and having a shared value and I
1:27
didn't expect how many people in the
1:29
audience had products that were Purpose
1:31
Driven one that where money went back to
1:33
charity another one that was very you
1:35
know to they were very focused on
1:36
sustainability another one though is you
1:38
know it's very interesting how many of
1:40
these brands are taking a bigger idea
1:42
and that's like just the product itself
1:44
so it really has a social good or
1:46
something that has a bigger kind of a
1:47
purpose to it that connects to people so
1:50
a lot of questions on that so I think
1:51
that the vibe is amazing the energy in
1:53
the room is fantastic and clearly it's
1:55
been some great conversations as well I
1:57
mean you got majorly a standing ovation
1:58
and he's not kidding when I went to grab
2:00
rolling to do this interview all you
2:02
listeners I mean he had a line of people
2:04
that came out I mean I had to interrupt
2:06
them and I know there you're actually
2:07
still waiting outside the booth right
2:09
now to talk to him so I don't know how
2:11
I'm gonna
2:11
come out you know but it's so funny
2:12
because you must have really touched
2:14
because I believe and I and it seems
2:16
like you obviously you're an expert in
2:18
this but branding the name the packaging
2:20
really designing something around your
2:22
product is super important for people
2:25
and your clients and your customers to
2:27
connect yeah one of the things we talk
2:29
about is in the presentation is that
2:33
design should be something that isn't
2:34
just a lost cost we saying that you
2:36
invest in because it comes back you know
2:37
and it really ends up moving your
2:39
product forward so we looked at very
2:40
simple designs we looked at things that
2:42
are very simple and clean you know for
2:43
the Apple or whatnot and then the more
2:45
kind of illustrative and kind of chaotic
2:47
like Casper you know the mattress
2:49
company we looked at that and I mean it
2:51
was trying to able to tell people that
2:52
needs to connect to the product of the
2:53
product look and the identity look need
2:55
to match that the that needs to connect
2:58
to the narrative as well so how do you
2:59
tell the larger story those three things
3:00
need to be the same I think the biggest
3:02
challenge that inventors have is being
3:04
consistent they're always improving and
3:05
they're going to change but you know
3:06
they're doing but their identity and the
3:09
way they design things in the package
3:11
and these meeting system people need to
3:12
always see the same thing so you need to
3:13
kind of keep that message the same over
3:15
and over and over just like you know in
3:17
the in politics you say the same line in
3:19
your stump speech everywhere you go they
3:21
need to do the same thing you know tag
3:24
lines or logos for large brands are
3:26
always the same so at some point need to
3:27
just keep hammering the same story in
3:29
the hammering the same look yeah you
3:31
kind of hit out ahead of you as you were
3:32
saying that I'm going well inventors are
3:33
always changing their products you know
3:34
but having the same you know message the
3:37
same packaging the same look to see yeah
3:39
it's funny just even the conversations
3:41
on the way here everything I could
3:43
change my name and I was really
3:44
interested in that one I'm glad that
3:45
they were open be able to think it
3:47
doesn't think about it unhappy to be
3:48
able to help them on a new name but they
3:50
also have to lock it in at some point
3:52
and just own it you know and and then
3:54
being consistent and you can do things
3:55
we're changing the campaign or the
3:57
narrative or the way you bring it to
3:59
life but you need to be able to make
4:00
those things consistent I think a lot
4:01
for inventors or entrepreneurs when
4:03
they're starting out because you're
4:04
constantly changing you know and kind of
4:06
tweaking things a little bit some point
4:07
needs to decide what your identity
4:08
system is and what your brand stands for
4:10
yeah you have to have that it just seems
4:13
like you know transition from the 60s
4:15
and 70s Eames like now everybody wants
4:17
to when they buy a product they want it
4:19
to be a part of something
4:21
yeah and that's sort of where that that
4:22
purpose side goes I mean I was
4:24
you have awareness of how you get your
4:26
your name out there you have
4:27
consideration how to decide if it's you
4:28
but it's not a purchase that points
4:30
engagement you know you have loyalty in
4:32
a way that people become loyal to a
4:33
product those products that I absolutely
4:34
love at home and I want to be on a
4:36
journey with that product it's not
4:37
because I just bought it and it's done
4:38
I keep hearing how they're improving it
4:40
how they're changing it what the
4:41
inventor what the you know or
4:42
entrepreneur what they what their value
4:45
system is so I think the people really
4:46
want to have an experience and connect
4:48
to that experience more than they
4:50
necessarily just buy a product you know
4:52
you see a little bit more transactional
4:53
and now I think it's about engagement
4:55
it's about the way that your product and
4:57
your customers life meet where do they
4:59
comes again and it kind of relates into
5:01
future sales or that product obviously
5:04
when you bring those clients in right I
5:05
mean you're you're becoming part of you
5:07
know I'm used to using these firms like
5:08
a tribe or your followers or whatever
5:10
exactly and I think that when you're
5:12
doing that you have a chance you talk a
5:14
lot about this of creating a new
5:15
category so one of the things we don't
5:18
think about anymore a detergent you know
5:19
the word detergent was created by tide
5:21
in the 1950s created you know again so
5:23
synthetic and now it's just about the
5:25
generic name so it begins as a movement
5:27
you know and it begins the science like
5:29
detergent is new and eventually gets
5:31
bigger and bigger it sounds just a
5:32
common term that's how these things go
5:33
it begins the same way you get a unique
5:35
experience a unique name a unique
5:37
category that you're in and hopefully at
5:39
Grossman you know we all be so lucky to
5:41
invent attire but as interesting so you
5:44
think detergent like a Kleenex for
5:46
cyclists is like the regular word
5:47
generic word that's reused for every I
5:49
even I did not know that yeah so
5:51
detergent yeah detergent is a synthetic
5:54
soap is organic they ones built to make
5:56
it clear that they were something
5:56
different than you want to compete
5:57
against soap detergent yeah so so for
6:00
the listeners I mean the product is
6:02
super important it has to work it has to
6:03
deliver yes but that brand that
6:05
packaging that yeah that message is
6:08
super important the identity so the
6:09
identity you have a logo you have your
6:12
style your colors the packaging and that
6:16
needs to be the same everywhere so your
6:18
logo needs to look the same as on your
6:19
website on your packaging
6:20
and keep it simple it needs to be able
6:22
to size how lot of different ways your
6:24
color guide you know and what your
6:25
colors are need to stay the same you
6:27
know keep that's consistent so that's
6:29
kind of your identity the second part is
6:31
your narrative your campaign how you
6:32
bring it to life how you tell the story
6:34
that's not lessen your identity that's
6:36
something else
6:37
be consistent you know repeat it over
6:39
and over and over and it may get tiring
6:40
but it's one of the things just like a
6:42
politician you gotta go tell that story
6:43
every single time you meet somebody and
6:45
you know and then the last thing is out
6:47
why do you exist why do you matter in
6:49
the world what is you why is it this
6:50
here that's that purpose yeah that
6:52
existential reason for being people have
6:54
such choices now yeah they can buy they
6:56
can go in a store they can buy online
6:57
but there's so many choices of the
6:59
products and everything you want them to
7:01
believe in your product you want them to
7:02
be a follower you want them to say it
7:04
works for me but they're doing something
7:05
extra that's right and I think that that
7:07
it's funny because people now they don't
7:09
buy things they buy experience right so
7:12
they want let's drive I like miles with
7:16
airlines you know I don't want miles I
7:17
want a vacation you know that's a solo
7:19
vacation don't sell the miles right you
7:21
know so I think if we're inventors it's
7:23
you can sell we talked about this in the
7:24
presentation but you can sell the
7:26
outcome what does the outcome of your
7:27
product honestly the feature of the
7:29
product you have a feature that's truly
7:30
different than great so that feature but
7:32
a lot of people end up selling the same
7:33
feature and they end up in what's called
7:35
sort of a sea of sameness you know it's
7:37
like nerve everybody saying the same
7:38
thing so maybe so the outcome what is it
7:40
like for people when they use that
7:41
product yeah yeah you and everyone and
7:44
you you're probably you're an expert
7:46
this everyone can figure out a way for
7:48
them to stand out right I mean to find
7:51
that niche yeah and those people just
7:53
because I had a lot of inventors that we
7:55
talked to and you probably run into they
7:57
say my products for everyone yeah
7:59
everyone like you're a big trouble then
8:01
if it's very well I know is funny
8:02
because a lot of the questions that did
8:03
come up at a sex which audience are you
8:05
going to you know like and and you may
8:07
want to you know have campaigns campaign
8:09
to a specific group but you have to own
8:11
something and housing that's ownable and
8:13
can't become generic in that way or you
8:15
know saying you can't bring a fight
8:17
against people were spending that much
8:18
money on media we talked about Geico you
8:20
know guy husband's we loved everybody
8:22
knows the promise that they're making in
8:24
the brand promise
8:24
they spend 1.3 billion dollars a year on
8:26
marketing you know so you're not gonna
8:28
beat that sort of company on that so
8:29
you're to have to be better in the way
8:31
you describe it and create more of an
8:32
emotional connection how are you that
8:34
was your brand of inspiring people you
8:36
know and giving them a sense that this
8:38
is really different yeah yeah I mean
8:40
that's exactly right and that's what the
8:42
inventors needed they have a great
8:43
product they are they're doing it they
8:45
they're putting their blood sweat or
8:47
tears or resources into it but then they
8:49
run into that where they
8:50
and they need somebody help them in this
8:52
case I think in this category what
8:54
you're talking about
8:55
really unless you're a brand expert I
8:58
mean it's a moat I think it's the most
8:59
important part your product is important
9:01
yeah I think that branding in the
9:03
packaging and all that is so it is and
9:05
that's why I think you should and it's
9:07
worthwhile investing that's not be huge
9:08
yeah I decide to be able to get some
9:10
somehow from naming to the identity look
9:13
and feel to how you really get to go in
9:15
campaign and get that out there so we
9:17
talked a lot about like using Facebook
9:19
and digital events as well but to put
9:21
those together you may want a little
9:22
help on being able to do the the design
9:24
and but also make sure that it's true to
9:27
use we talked about being able to put up
9:29
the images that you think of as the
9:30
inventor what is it that why is it
9:32
important to you so don't let the
9:34
identity get so far away from you that
9:35
it doesn't speak back to your world and
9:37
where you come from us but what does it
9:39
feel like it's really coming from that
9:40
person because a lot of ways you're the
9:42
spokesperson you're the person who's
9:43
good at that's so important to that and
9:45
make sure that's true to you but at the
9:46
same time needs to be clear and to be
9:48
simple and he's be well designed ya know
9:50
and I like what you said is that you
9:51
know be emotional with it but also be
9:53
open the changes because they both have
9:56
to clip and we also talked about going
10:00
and listening to your customers you know
10:01
your product is one moment and literally
10:07
take a piece of paper draw from a.m. to
10:08
p.m. left to right and write all the
10:10
things that your customer does go and
10:12
watch them what do they do talk to them
10:13
what do they you know do they care about
10:15
wasn't a promise they care about what do
10:17
they do for their job what are they
10:18
where they go what sort of movies do
10:19
they see you know start having more
10:21
empathy for them and then once you see
10:23
that you see the world that they live in
10:24
maybe your product can expand a little
10:26
bit more and tell a bigger story there
10:27
so don't just think about that moment of
10:29
purchase or the moment that they're
10:30
using it because if you do that you're
10:32
really defining just that one little
10:33
tiny moment in the day that they think
10:35
about you what's the bigger picture
10:36
what's that journey that you're on
10:38
together with them and try to capture it
10:40
there we talk to a lot of pet products
10:41
and so you know you could sell the
10:43
moment that your pet eats but what if
10:45
you sell there you know if your talk
10:46
about their health over time you know a
10:47
lot of ways you can tell a bigger story
10:48
yeah yeah and it's it's funny to me
10:52
because it sounds like you're describing
10:53
like a living thing yeah you know it's
10:55
constantly growing in keene great way to
10:57
put it yeah no it's a great way to put
10:59
it
10:59
living brands in the way that things are
11:01
in a journey that they're on and
11:03
experiences it is living this reason why
11:04
it's not just a linear path of hate when
11:07
you found out about your product they
11:08
consider it and they bought it and
11:09
you're done I think if you do that
11:10
you've missed a whole moment of
11:12
engagement and loyalty and the way that
11:13
somebody can actually really be a part
11:15
of that story ongoing yeah that's that's
11:18
good let's I mean I you know I don't I
11:19
know you're busy we only got a few
11:20
minutes what's going on with you what's
11:22
uh what's happening what company you
11:23
work I know you got so much going on but
11:25
what give us a little bit of what's
11:26
happening I work for a firm called
11:28
torneo we're a global CEO advisory firm
11:30
I run design and innovation there
11:34
tane oh very interesting we work with
11:36
70% of the Fortune 100 and I know a
11:38
fortune 100 and fortune 500 CEOs define
11:41
their brands articulate with how they
11:43
get to their customer and design better
11:45
products did you say 70% that's those
11:50
small no that's great yeah we so we and
11:53
it's a relatively young company I joined
11:56
three years ago but it's about six years
11:58
old now and the company and it's grown
12:01
tremendously and part of it I could say
12:02
and I didn't come up with the brand but
12:05
it's because they have a very clear
12:06
offer they talk to the CEO we talked to
12:08
the CEO and we talk to the CEO uniquely
12:11
yeah
12:12
that communication yeah is so important
12:14
yeah we know and so our brand is about
12:16
meeting the need of the CEO and that's
12:19
where I think we've done furloughs unmet
12:21
need they're you know it's oh yeah so
12:23
today Oh is is where I met and there for
12:25
the last three years and get to work on
12:27
amazing clients there yeah well you
12:29
don't be I know you're being pretty
12:30
modest but and and you know I did not
12:32
before the cop before our conversation I
12:34
read up a little bit about you and I
12:35
think you're doing some awesome work
12:36
some cool stuff and in today I mean to
12:40
have 7% and and that's a good market to
12:42
be in the Fortune 100 well we would we
12:45
look at large brands and the challenges
12:46
that large brands are going through but
12:48
actually you know it's funny except
12:49
preparing for this it's the same thing
12:51
that founders go through you know the
12:53
way people are consuming information has
12:54
changed technology social media people
12:58
are changing their cultural values very
13:00
quickly like that rate of change is
13:01
happening much faster
13:02
there's geopolitical and political
13:04
uncertainty like where things going sure
13:06
all these things are making a very you
13:08
know
13:09
a very difficult plan for large
13:11
companies but also for founders coming
13:13
in there's not a simple playbook anymore
13:14
to be able to say hey you know what you
13:16
do you go buy a whole bunch of
13:17
advertising you repeat that message over
13:19
and over and we're gonna buy it doesn't
13:20
work that way anymore you got to come up
13:21
with new ways to build to reach people
13:23
new ways to talk to them so and that's
13:25
what video large fortune 100 companies
13:27
are dealing with and also what small
13:29
entrepreneurs dealing with as well or
13:30
the startups entrepreneur which I've
13:32
been as well in the past went for me to
13:34
last four years that I've been in well I
13:39
mean and again it's it's just it's just
13:40
it's just a scale you know you know
13:42
founders 1 1 2 employees up to hundreds
13:45
and thousands of coins it's still the
13:46
same customer who's buying it at the end
13:48
so it's still one person who's making a
13:50
decision if they're buying a car if
13:51
they're buying you know they're going to
13:54
a restaurant if they're buying a service
13:56
and entrepreneurs still selling some so
13:58
the nice thing is that it's a very level
13:59
playing field so one to one but are big
14:01
that you know you may have a bigger
14:02
company has more resources but so long
14:04
customer who makes one decision to be
14:05
able to do it so if you I think the more
14:07
that you listen to your customer the
14:08
more that you have empathetic for where
14:10
they're sitting and how to be able to
14:12
put and not just think about yourself in
14:13
your own product but what does it fit in
14:14
their world the better that you're going
14:16
to do yeah it's awesome well Roland I
14:18
know that you're gonna be heading back
14:19
you're doing some more talk with some
14:21
more inventors here in Tampa you're
14:23
gonna be heading back to New York you
14:25
survived the cold weather up there that
14:27
was funny actually coming down I was a
14:29
50° when I left there and 50 degrees
14:31
when they came here you know but well
14:37
New York is it's such a great place to
14:40
go and live I mean it's just so fast
14:42
moving in so much fun you know you just
14:45
gotta get used to a chronic I love the
14:46
energy I thrive on the energy and yeah
14:48
in New York when we're right in the
14:49
middle of it and and I love that a lot
14:51
of travel for so you know but every
14:55
single time I fly back into New York I
14:56
get that buzz energy again you know yeah
14:59
and so I love yeah that's great that's
15:02
great Justin just in case some people
15:04
some more listeners might have a
15:05
question for you how can they get in
15:06
touch with your social media stuff
15:08
social media is great so they have more
15:10
than I'm on Twitter it's just at Roland
15:11
Hobbs and my names are the W sorrow WLAN
15:14
Diaz that's probably the best place to
15:15
be able to follow me and then happy to
15:17
chat with people there perfect well Ron
15:20
thank you for stopping by the studio
15:21
today or
15:22
we appreciate everything you're doing
15:24
for inventors we'll be watching you
15:26
because some great stuff going on and
15:28
we'll we'll forward any questions that
15:30
we get over to you yeah and again thanks
15:33
for stopping by and we'll talk to you
15:34
soon
15:34
yeah no thank you all right buddy