HSN Vice President of Merchandise Dara Trujillo Talks About How She Got in The Industry and What She Does at HSN

wipo_ippolicies_500
Intellectual Property Through Universities, Who Gets The Credit?
April 25, 2018
15-year-old Inventor of Tip Tough, RJ Batts Shares How he Came up With This Pro Chef Tool
May 4, 2018


Retail executive with more than 25 years experience in brick and mortar and theme park merchandise with a new focus on television retail. Experienced in brand management, developing signature events and private label lines to grow gross profit, customer perception and awareness. Ability to determine growth opportunities, identify white space and generate point of differential retail to maximize revenue. Negotiation skills partnerships and responsibility are key traits to success. Leader, mentor, excellent presentation skills- concept developer, brand builder, experienced in all aspects of retail development and management.

The Inventors Launchpad – Roadmap to Success Series is presented by Inventors Launchpad in beautiful Tampa Bay, FL and hosted by Carmine Denisco. Carmine is an accomplished Author, Entrepreneur, Inventor and Co-founder/Managing Partner of Inventors Launchpad. Along with his business partner Rick Valderrama has changed the face of the invention industry and look forward to helping inventors from all over the world move their ideas forward. For more information please visit www.inventorslaunchpad.com

Watch the podcast here!

 

Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
hi everyone and welcome to the inventors
0:04
Launchpad Network
0:05
I am carmine danesco your host for
0:08
today's show of the inventors Launchpad
0:11
and today I have an awesome guest on she
0:14
has been around the grocery and shoe
0:17
store business I want to say or
0:21
enterprises since she was 15 years old I
0:24
mean she's been working on the accounts
0:25
and putting products and stores and
0:27
talking to buyers and probably everyone
0:28
from the stock guys all the way up to
0:32
the CEOs her name is Angela flatland and
0:34
I have her on the line hey Angela over
0:36
there I'm here hey Hayden very good you
0:39
made it onto the show I know you you're
0:44
out of the Chicago area I'm glad that's
0:46
warming up for you over there this is
0:48
crazy winter we've been having but
0:50
hopefully you're gonna be able to get
0:52
out and mingle around the great Chicago
0:54
area soon yeah
0:56
45 degrees it's practically swimsuit
0:58
weather here yeah you know I noticed
1:02
that too when I moved down to Tampa I
1:04
thought that 40 degrees and 50 degrees
1:06
was warm I'd be driving around say to
1:08
top down to my car I'd be bicycling now
1:10
when it's 40 or 50 degrees I think it's
1:12
freezing cold out so again thanks we
1:18
were talking a little bit before we
1:19
started the show and it's amazing to me
1:22
that you've been around the grocery the
1:24
actual industry itself you know products
1:28
and and putting products and stores any
1:30
accounting for so long how did you get
1:34
started in and how do you get started
1:35
that young well start out by saying it
1:39
definitely wasn't by choice no I love
1:43
the stories of these young kids that
1:45
develop you know a lollipop product and
1:48
they are so driven by age Chenin that
1:50
really wasn't me I was brought into it
1:53
by a family business so my dad had
1:57
worked in distribution magazine and book
1:59
distribution for about 30 years before
2:02
starting his own distribution company
2:04
and I really grew up in the business
2:06
with him because he grew up a farmer
2:09
with farmers mentality that your
2:11
children work with you
2:12
and so I was able to I mean I really
2:16
start at like age 10 which is probably
2:20
not legal for me to say but you know I
2:22
was I started in the back room just
2:24
stick cream product that needed to have
2:26
stickers on it and it was a licensed
2:31
sports product business so I worked with
2:34
non-food buyers and we had anything from
2:38
like NFL product to NBA NASCAR FIFA you
2:42
know if you walked into a grocery store
2:43
and you saw that product on there there
2:46
was someone from possibly interstate
2:48
promotions that was delivering it so I
2:51
started out you know just stickering
2:54
product and then I worked my way up to
2:57
doing it in paperwork and working with
3:00
vendors middle school I spend my summers
3:04
working in the back room packing boxes
3:07
so I was able to understand how that
3:12
sided distribution model works where
3:14
it's really pick and pack based on some
3:18
of the stores we were working with we
3:19
did two-week replenish wins with
3:21
companies like Kroger and Meijer and
3:24
then from there about 15 years old my
3:28
dad started taking me the trade shows
3:30
and I was attending trade show so I was
3:33
working with a lot of the vendors and
3:35
then I started working with some of our
3:38
buyers and then started really attending
3:41
meetings with buyers when I was about 16
3:43
17 and then when I started college at 17
3:47
I took over as the main account manager
3:50
for Publix supermarkets in the south
3:54
southeast we loved Publix and also I
3:59
worked with Walgreens and CVS at the
4:01
time when they had decentralized buying
4:02
so yeah that's what I was doing
4:06
throughout college and it's it was a
4:09
great launch pad for my career Wow I
4:12
mean you say it I mean I know that you
4:16
know it was it was over a span amount of
4:18
time but the amount of information that
4:20
you just gave I mean from when you
4:21
started when you were
4:22
that young up until now or up until when
4:25
you were in college I mean you were
4:27
working with some pretty big grocery
4:31
chains I mean you know these are these
4:33
are chains that are huge in the area are
4:35
in the u.s. now and it must have been
4:38
amazing now that you look back at having
4:41
that much responsibility it's it's
4:44
pretty it is it's amazing that you were
4:46
doing that thank you
4:48
yeah I mean it's you know when you're
4:50
doing something especially when it's
4:52
kind of the second nature to you and
4:54
your I was young and I didn't really
4:56
understand the importance of it or I
5:00
didn't really understand the fact that I
5:01
was you know 18 years old walking into
5:05
meetings where everyone was three or
5:08
four times my age maybe not four times
5:10
my age but you know I was just doing
5:15
what felt natural and I was you know
5:18
building relationships with my clients
5:21
so yeah that's cool does it seem like
5:26
even now and we'll talk kind of talk
5:28
about what you're doing now earlier in
5:31
your career when you were doing that go
5:34
go through high school and then go into
5:36
college you know a lot of a lot of kids
5:38
don't have that much responsibilities in
5:41
what they're doing and like you said it
5:43
was kind of natural
5:44
was it fun what you were doing or did
5:46
you say man I want to be out with my
5:48
friends and you know or was a kind of a
5:49
balance of both you liked having the
5:51
responsibility and working environment
5:53
but also you know you also wanted to be
5:56
out you know cuz in high school and
5:57
things I mean you were working all
5:58
through that right yeah I was but I
6:02
didn't really think it was not normal
6:05
that I was working I mean I grew up in
6:07
Wisconsin so pretty much everyone I knew
6:10
had a job or you know their parents got
6:13
them a job during the summers and in
6:15
college you know I was making money and
6:18
that was awesome I could go and work
6:20
during the entire summer and make money
6:23
but also I could see the impact I was
6:26
having because I could walk into my
6:28
local Publix and be like whoa this 30
6:30
foot planogram is something like I built
6:31
out and I created and I helped put into
6:34
this store and it was
6:35
really rewarding so I was going to
6:37
business classes while I was doing this
6:39
and learning so much more working than I
6:43
ever would have and just sitting in
6:44
class wow that is really cool I mean
6:48
being able to see what you're working on
6:50
and and you know there's people now when
6:52
you mentioned planning Graham or putting
6:54
parts into stores
6:55
they just they're you know they're they
6:57
don't know what you're talking about and
6:58
you were doing that when you were
6:59
younger and in your beginning your
7:01
career which is really cool
7:03
now the the groceries and C stores that
7:07
you were working with where were you you
7:10
were working with certain types of
7:12
products or were you able to get other
7:15
products or is it kind of just what your
7:16
what your family said hey visit aprox
7:19
that we're putting in or where people
7:20
send you things to look at so it was
7:25
licensed sports products which really
7:27
was I know I said earlier it was NFL and
7:30
CFL a NASCAR FIFA NBA MLB and there are
7:36
tons of new products developed by really
7:39
kind of like Mon pawn shops I mean
7:41
there's most of the products maybe like
7:44
80% of the products in that industry are
7:47
made by five companies and then the rest
7:50
of them are really cool innovative
7:52
products not to say that these larger
7:54
companies don't make innovative products
7:56
but you have I mean I remember when in
7:59
college there was this really small
8:02
company this one guy and he had his
8:05
license soaps made and so we put that in
8:08
stores and then you know there was like
8:11
glitter tattoos that came out I mean it
8:13
there's there was a little smaller
8:16
companies that were able to kind of get
8:18
into the mix and they would come to us
8:20
as a distributor that already had those
8:23
built in relationships with retailers to
8:26
get their products into stores that's I
8:30
think it's kind of an easy route because
8:32
when you're working with whether it's a
8:34
distributor or a brokerage firm they've
8:38
got the relationships and so it's way
8:41
faster for them to get you set up you're
8:44
not you don't have to set up a whole new
8:46
account as a new vendor
8:48
you can go through them and then they
8:50
just set you up with a new item code and
8:53
you can get right into a retailer it's a
8:56
little bit faster but of course you're
8:59
losing a little bit more of your margins
9:01
doing so but yeah we we sourced product
9:05
a lot of product was sent to us and then
9:07
of course every few months my buyers
9:10
were looking for okay what is some of
9:12
the new products that you have
9:14
we probably presented about a hundred
9:17
new products each year wow that's a lot
9:22
of products I mean free for you to do
9:24
that and the thing that I think is
9:26
really cool is that you know you have
9:29
the ability to look at those products
9:31
and and and take those on and then show
9:33
them to the buyers but it's a lot of
9:36
responsibility right I mean you're
9:38
you're taking somebody's idea and then
9:40
you're now did you also do the
9:41
manufacturing or you know you kind of
9:43
outsource that nope all the
9:46
manufacturing was done by our vendors so
9:49
our vendors were manufacturers and then
9:51
we were really just kind of the third
9:53
party I mean it was I'm not sure if
9:56
you're familiar with the term category
9:58
management but because the buyers I was
10:02
working with were non-food buyers they
10:04
had you know all different categories
10:06
under just non-food products and really
10:10
the sports side of it needs its own
10:13
category manager so essentially that's
10:15
what we did so we built out displays and
10:18
we built out planogram sets for the
10:21
retailers so it wasn't something they
10:24
had to add on to their plate Wow Wow
10:28
it's awesome I mean it's a it sounds
10:30
like I mean it's a lot of work to get
10:32
all that set up and say this is gonna
10:34
work I mean to me there's a there's a
10:36
lot of preparation involved in something
10:38
like that lots of details and lots of
10:42
data yeah okay yeah Wow unbelievable you
10:47
know just we get a lot invented here we
10:50
get a lot of product sent to us and for
10:52
some reason and and sports and seem like
10:55
a big topic but I don't think they
10:57
realize a lot of the inventors even
10:59
before they start the invention
11:01
that it's so much easier and I agree
11:04
with you a hundred percent is to find
11:06
someone who's already doing it because
11:08
having those one-hit wonders is nice and
11:10
to say but it's very hard for a single
11:12
product to break into the market or is
11:15
it almost impossible to get a licensing
11:17
deal with sports oh yeah licensing is I
11:21
mean to be honest it can be an absolute
11:24
nightmare especially when you're dealing
11:26
with collegiate but yeah you're right if
11:30
you've got a single product unless that
11:31
single product is really strong like
11:34
redbull for example I mean and you're
11:37
gonna hit the market strong with
11:39
marketing and that one product and you
11:41
know it's gonna go out to the masses but
11:42
if you've got like one t-shirt design or
11:47
like one hat design it's probably best
11:49
to start with someone that already has a
11:52
connection but there's no harm and
11:56
trying to hit the pavement and go into
11:58
mediums on your own in fact we've had
12:01
with some of the buyers that I've worked
12:03
with they have actually sent us they've
12:07
sent us some products and they've
12:09
introduced us to companies that they
12:11
said okay we might want to be interested
12:13
in carrying this product in our store
12:14
but we'd like to have you work with them
12:17
because you know that way we don't have
12:19
to set them up for just one or two items
12:22
yeah I mean to me and again I love
12:25
making money and I'm sure your inventors
12:27
or product developers did but sometimes
12:29
it would be easier for somebody like
12:30
yourself you know the in and out you
12:32
know and without saying that you know
12:34
the tips the tricks how to get things
12:35
moving a lot faster I might not make all
12:38
the money but to me it's so much easier
12:40
to have somebody like you handle it all
12:42
yeah absolutely
12:44
especially when it comes to logistics
12:47
and when it comes to the actual sales
12:50
part of it
12:52
I mean sales is such an important part
12:56
when you're building a company you
12:58
really I always say like marketing is
12:59
really important but like more important
13:01
that is like you have to have a good
13:02
sales team or you have to be a good
13:04
salesperson yourself and you know it's
13:07
about believing in your product but it's
13:09
if you're not out there showing everyone
13:13
your products showing what you have
13:16
you you got to work with these kind of
13:19
third-party companies that can do so and
13:22
brokerage firms are fantastic at you
13:26
know helping you get into the door and
13:29
there's also times and there's the
13:31
ability once you get into the door
13:33
through brokerage firm doesn't mean that
13:34
you always have to stay with them you
13:36
can develop your own relationship with a
13:37
retailer later on and then sell direct
13:40
depending on if you're building out your
13:42
company in your products or depending on
13:45
if your sales are just off out the roof
13:48
with your one product then maybe the
13:50
retailer will want to go direct with you
13:52
so yeah there's always possibilities for
13:56
change but there's there's a whole
13:59
there's so many different ways to get
14:00
into a retailer and that's just one of
14:03
the avenues well and again it's it's one
14:06
of those things where everyone is so
14:09
starved for time everyone's busy
14:10
especially in in the retailers and in
14:12
and the grocer is that you know having
14:15
somebody like yourself looking at
14:17
products and and really deciding you
14:19
know this is something I need because a
14:21
buyer the buyer is when their take a
14:23
product on you know they want to make
14:25
sure obviously it's gonna it's gonna
14:27
sell something I mean there's got to be
14:29
some kind of quota when it when a buyer
14:30
brings a product on right yeah I mean
14:34
they're gonna look I they want to really
14:36
know what they're mean they look at what
14:39
your retail is they look at I mean you
14:44
should definitely know your own numbers
14:45
they they want to know that they you
14:48
understand if you're gonna be making a
14:50
profit on this at least good buyers that
14:53
I have worked with and with newer
14:55
companies they tend to ask these
14:57
questions like do you know your numbers
14:59
but they want to know their margins
15:01
they're gonna take a look at your your
15:03
suggested retail price they might want
15:06
to change your suggested retail price
15:08
they're gonna give you notes whenever
15:11
you present a new product or you either
15:13
gonna say no or this packaging needs to
15:16
be changed or you need to get this this
15:20
and this certifications on your product
15:23
but what's awesome about what's happened
15:27
and retail over the past few years is
15:29
that localization is is kind of taken
15:32
over and it's not just for like the
15:34
montage shops anymore you've got major
15:38
supermarket chains all trying to build
15:41
out at their local sections and trying
15:43
to have something more local and unique
15:47
to you know the area of what some of
15:50
their stores and so even if they're not
15:52
taking you in every single store they
15:54
can test out and maybe 10 20 100 stores
15:58
depending on the retailer yeah it seems
16:01
and me we can get into law it seems like
16:03
grocery stores and see stores are going
16:05
through a transition where they're
16:07
trying to be more localized to to the to
16:09
the markets that they're in in the
16:11
pounds it's what it seems like to me
16:14
anyway yep absolutely Wow so so I know
16:18
you've been working in this industry for
16:21
a while
16:21
what you know what it woody what did you
16:23
have you transitioned into are you still
16:25
working in that I know you you're doing
16:27
some other stuff what so what's going on
16:28
with you now so my dad is somewhere on a
16:33
boat right now he retired and I'm so
16:36
happy for him I wanted to pursue some of
16:40
my other passions I wanted to learn a
16:42
lot more about the industry outside of
16:45
just distribution so I spent two years
16:47
working at a data analytics start-up so
16:50
working with basket level data and
16:53
understanding more about how to use that
16:55
basket data for category management and
16:59
so I got the opportunity to work with
17:03
some large C store retailers as well as
17:06
grocery retailers and in partnership
17:10
with companies like anheuser-busch and
17:12
coca-cola and Kraft Heinz and Hershey's
17:16
so I got to be on the food side the food
17:20
and beverage side which was I mean a
17:23
whole different scale of things it was
17:27
fantastic to be able to work with the
17:30
amount of data that they had and I mean
17:34
it's really limitless the amount of
17:37
solutions that been can be created now
17:39
with technology
17:40
available to us I was building
17:43
planograms off Excel spreadsheets and
17:45
now there's ten different technologies
17:49
that can really automate that process
17:51
and to someone who knows how to you know
17:54
build out a planogram or create category
17:57
management you know it's it's like all
17:59
the things you need is right in front of
18:01
you with technology to be able to create
18:04
something best-in-class for consumers
18:07
coming into the store yeah it's it's
18:11
funny because as you started talking
18:13
about the data it sounded like you like
18:15
you lit up more like you love talking
18:17
about data I'm such a nerd for data it's
18:21
like you know especially in sales and
18:25
you know you want to anything you want
18:27
to know about how to make your product
18:29
better it's all in the data and you want
18:35
to personalize how you mark it you want
18:37
to personalize your own products and and
18:40
what you're doing in stores and it's all
18:43
there it's just sometimes it's not
18:46
easily accessible but things are
18:49
changing so it's been really cool in the
18:53
past few years to go from like working
18:55
with Excel spreadsheets and basic sales
18:57
year-over-year data to working with
19:00
knowing what products are selling with
19:04
what other products today like lat the
19:07
last few hours so it's been a cool
19:11
change and an experience with my career
19:14
and so I spent two years doing that and
19:17
now I'm on the trade publishing side so
19:21
I work at a publication called
19:22
progressive grocer and I now get this I
19:28
want to say like a 30,000 foot view of
19:31
the industry which is just incredible I
19:34
can see what trends are happening new
19:37
products everything before it starts
19:39
hitting the retail stores and our
19:41
audience are these buyers and category
19:44
managers and CEOs of major grocery
19:46
chains and down to kind of small mom pop
19:49
stores so I trans
19:53
into this position so I could learn more
19:56
about the trade side of it and I've been
19:59
loving it so far
20:00
wow you know it just a little touch on
20:03
the data that I I think that the data is
20:06
cool but I think a lot of people would
20:08
be so in awe you know to realize they
20:12
don't I guess they just don't realize
20:13
how much data is actually collected on
20:16
shoppers and their and their habits and
20:18
what they do and to me I'm a big tech
20:21
guy too so I think that people would be
20:23
so surprised if they really knew how
20:25
much data was collected yeah exactly
20:28
check your cell phones if you've got
20:30
your location data on you got your
20:32
microphone on there collecting that data
20:34
so unbelievable I mean I love it I think
20:37
it's being used for good it can really
20:40
like you said target each customer's
20:42
specific you know wants and needs and I
20:44
just can't wait for the future on how
20:47
it's going to be but but going back to
20:49
what you were just talking about you
20:51
know you know transitioning into what
20:53
you're doing now while you're walking in
20:57
the old in the industry I know you go to
20:59
shows and you you're probably talking to
21:01
so many people within the industry are
21:03
they surprised by how much knowledge and
21:06
experience you really have uh I don't
21:11
mean it in a bad way doing this for so
21:14
long and you're so and you're young and
21:17
you've been doing this for so long that
21:18
it's just to me you had the information
21:21
you have so much background I would
21:24
think that they're just surprised like
21:25
wow you know you have so much knowledge
21:27
in this you know I feel like everyone's
21:30
their own mini expert everyone is very
21:32
much an expert in their own field so I
21:38
don't like to think of myself as an
21:40
expert cuz there's so much to learn and
21:42
so much to know and I I don't know if
21:45
anyone's like truly surprised with my
21:49
knowledge I think people are probably
21:50
more surprised that I was like managing
21:54
when I was like 15 years old but yeah I
22:00
don't I don't really know I think people
22:03
are surprised more about how crazy
22:05
passionate
22:06
about it well again it probably just
22:10
goes back to as you said you've been you
22:11
know your background and you've been
22:13
working and you know it so well and
22:14
obviously you like the industry or you
22:17
wouldn't have stayed in it for this long
22:19
because you so young and which is really
22:22
cool
22:23
now progressive grocer they've been
22:25
around a long time too right what what
22:27
do you what you can't what do you like
22:30
about working there and is it's just
22:31
something that tests your test your
22:33
abilities or you get to talk to everyone
22:35
in the industry is it is it something
22:37
specific or kind of the overall yeah so
22:41
right now for progressive grocer and a
22:43
couple of other publications that are
22:45
sister publications I manage the Midwest
22:49
territory for sales so I am working with
22:52
you know all these CPG distribution
22:56
companies food manufacturers beverage
22:59
manufacturers non food manufacturers and
23:01
this takes anyone who really sells or it
23:04
wants to sell into grocery chains who
23:08
all work with them and I want to hear
23:10
you know what
23:11
what are they focused on for the year do
23:13
they have new products you know what
23:16
what are their priorities and I gotta
23:18
see the trends and I gotta see what
23:21
they're really looking forward to in
23:24
2018 2019 2020 and it's I mean that's my
23:29
favorite part is that I get to work with
23:31
people who are really excited about
23:33
their products especially some of these
23:34
brand new food companies out there on
23:37
the market I mean there's I live in
23:40
Chicago and Chicago is such a base for
23:44
food technology and as well as just like
23:48
food innovation and so you've got big
23:51
companies like our X bar that have just
23:55
been sold to Kellogg's for six hundred
23:58
million dollars and you see it companies
24:00:00
like that they after five years that's
24:02:00
from going from like making their
24:05:00
product and I think it was like their
24:07:00
basement our garage to selling into that
24:09:00
amount and a lot of smaller companies
24:13:00
like t-squares and simple Mills which is
24:16:00
growing to be a massive company as well
24:19:00
and then you've got you know Konig or
24:21:00
Kraft Heinz there there's there's a lot
24:26:00
of really cool unique shifts that are
24:29:00
happening and in the food industry so
24:32:00
that's been my most rewarding thing
24:34:00
about being a progressive grocer is
24:36:00
being able to see that and also help
24:39:00
help some of these small guys you know
24:41:00
they they deserve to be on the Shelf as
24:45:00
well and they just need help getting the
24:47:00
product out there so that's very
24:48:00
rewarding for me yeah yeah well I mean I
24:52:00
think it's a it's a perfect transition
24:53:00
for somebody like yourself your your
24:55:00
passion about the industry now having
24:57:00
your finger on all the happenings and
24:59:00
knowing what's going on it's probably
25:01:00
pretty exciting because you're you know
25:03:00
and you mentioned something that is that
25:04:00
I don't think a lot of product
25:07:00
developers or inventors realize is that
25:09:00
these things take time so even if you
25:12:00
have a product that grocer or somebody
25:15:00
wants to put it on their shelves I mean
25:16:00
there's a certain amount of time that it
25:18:00
takes right to happen overnight no it
25:23:00
doesn't and that having the patience for
25:27:00
that and having the stamina to just keep
25:30:00
going can be difficult I know just from
25:35:00
some of the companies I've I've worked
25:37:00
with and who have reached out to me in
25:39:00
the past year you know they they kind of
25:42:00
go through ups and downs where you know
25:45:00
do you get the high where they say okay
25:47:00
we're gonna carry your product and then
25:49:00
three months later they'll take your
25:51:00
product off the shelf and so really it's
25:55:00
about knocking on as many doors as you
25:58:00
can and taking feedback
26:00:00
I mean buyers if they say they're you're
26:03:00
gonna take it product ask them why I
26:04:00
mean take as much feedback as you can
26:07:00
and build continue to build out your
26:12:00
products using that feedback and there's
26:16:00
a timely shift as well so I mean 30
26:20:00
years ago like vegan mayonnaise not
26:23:00
really a big thing right it mean it was
26:25:00
like basically probably a mom paw
26:28:00
somewhere like making it and then like
26:29:00
selling it to their local corner store
26:33:00
now huge huge market for vegan
26:37:00
mayonnaise so I mean it's about being
26:39:00
timely and you've got companies like
26:41:00
follow your heart who have been working
26:43:00
on that for 30 years and you know the
26:46:00
past few years have really hit I mean
26:49:00
hit it big because they've waited in the
26:52:00
market kind of in the need for it caught
26:55:00
up with them so those are a couple of
26:58:00
things that I always tell any new
27:02:00
product companies to consider Wow
27:05:00
yeah I mean that's you know that's great
27:08:00
advice because I mean it's so true you
27:10:00
don't really think about timing is so
27:12:00
important and it seems like as you said
27:14:00
there's a lot of little brands popping
27:18:00
up that are specialty type brands and
27:20:00
you wonder how are they gonna make it
27:22:00
but they seem like they catch on
27:23:00
sometimes yeah I mean a lot of these
27:28:00
larger food manufacturers they're
27:31:00
watching their going to shows like Expo
27:35:00
East and Expo West which are natural
27:37:00
product shows that I hear have a three
27:41:00
year waiting list to just yet to have a
27:45:00
booth so they go to these shows and they
27:49:00
go to all the different trade shows and
27:50:00
they're they're keeping in touch with
27:52:00
trade marketing companies like
27:54:00
progressive grocer and they're tracking
27:59:00
to see you know what products are
28:01:00
starting to pick up even just small
28:03:00
local products and they're not afraid to
28:07:00
to buy out a company when it's a little
28:09:00
bit smaller so they're I mean there's
28:14:00
definitely opportunity there but I'm
28:19:00
just I'm just seeing a little bit more
28:23:00
that larger manufacturers are instead of
28:29:00
trying to innovate their own product or
28:33:00
just buying companies that have it
28:36:00
already built out Wow yeah probably
28:39:00
easier for them because it's catching on
28:41:00
and they're probably like you said
28:42:00
they're probably starting to see the
28:43:00
trend and they're wondering what's
28:44:00
happening to their market share so
28:46:00
they're like we
28:46:00
we better do something about this so
28:49:00
they're starting to realize that they
28:51:00
just can't sit back no and they want to
28:55:00
they want to buy companies that have a
28:57:00
brand loyalty with it and with how
29:02:00
consumer marketing has changed over the
29:04:00
past years the social it's it's you know
29:08:00
way easier to build that brand loyalty
29:11:00
and that brands following through social
29:13:00
media now and I don't know it's a lot of
29:17:00
food brands coming out the market are
29:22:00
developing that are focusing on not
29:24:00
enough because that's something that you
29:28:00
know investors are looking at yeah
29:31:00
sometimes they're just real you're just
29:33:00
so big they just sat back and they they
29:35:00
lived on what they were doing well and
29:37:00
they just haven't changed and then when
29:39:00
they start seeing this trend going the
29:41:00
wrong way there's a little bit behind
29:43:00
probably right yeah and it's I mean you
29:48:00
think about it it's it's easier to buy a
29:52:00
company that already has something
29:54:00
already set up than to start a brand new
29:56:00
yourself so it kind of just makes sense
30:01:00
for them to do that and a lot of these
30:03:00
companies they think Kellogg's learned a
30:07:00
lesson with Kashi a couple years back
30:09:00
when they tried to buy out caution now
30:12:00
they're letting Kashi do its own thing
30:14:00
completely separate and has its own
30:17:00
brand power so that way it can kind of
30:21:00
live as its own identity but still under
30:23:00
the Kellogg's brand yeah yeah that's
30:26:00
great it's you know things like that you
30:28:00
don't realise you mean you be in
30:30:00
industry just giving that little bit of
30:32:00
inside information or just bringing it
30:34:00
to light you know it really helps put it
30:36:00
into perspective we're running a little
30:39:00
bit low on time and I think we spoke a
30:41:00
little bit about this for an inventor or
30:43:00
somebody who has a product that is
30:45:00
thinks that their product would be good
30:47:00
for you know maybe it's not a food
30:50:00
product but it still can go into a
30:51:00
grocer or a C store what do you think
30:55:00
that inventors first step should be if
30:57:00
they're trying to trying to get it into
30:59:00
the store
31:00:00
I would always the first thing to do is
31:03:00
always research what's already out there
31:06:00
you know pay attention to trade really
31:12:00
for grocery there I mean I'm always
31:16:00
gonna plug like my own publication but
31:18:00
progressive grocer is a great resource
31:21:00
you can check out the website and
31:24:00
there's the newsletters it'll always
31:25:00
tell you about what's happening in the
31:27:00
industry you have questions you know ask
31:30:00
you can always ask around
31:34:00
I mean LinkedIn is such a fantastic
31:36:00
source that you can see if someone's
31:38:00
doing consulting and you can you know
31:40:00
ask to bring on a consultant and/or
31:45:00
bring on it an advisor to help you out
31:48:00
but really it's research and then we get
31:52:00
a progressive grocer we all sorts of new
31:54:00
products and and sometimes they're
31:57:00
really not ready for the market but
31:58:00
people send us their products anyways
32:00:00
and most of time like our editorial team
32:03:00
will give feedback on that and you know
32:07:00
and sometimes they get published which
32:09:00
is great because I've seen a new new
32:13:00
proximate thing but there was like a
32:14:00
brownie brownie brittle a couple years
32:18:00
back and they were republished and and
32:21:00
in our publication and then picked up by
32:24:00
over a thousand locations after that so
32:26:00
it does work trade trade marketing
32:30:00
definitely does work and then I would go
32:36:00
to a local local buyer some local store
32:39:00
and ask ask them ask to meet with the
32:44:00
the buyer set up try to set up a meeting
32:46:00
with them and and pick their brain see
32:49:00
what they think have them sample your
32:51:00
product if it's a food or beverage or I
32:56:00
mean really it's about putting in the
32:59:00
hustle and knocking on as many doors as
33:01:00
possible yeah I think just as you said
33:05:00
they're looking they're always looking
33:06:00
for new products or new idea just
33:09:00
getting in front of them being ready I
33:10:00
like what you said they need to be ready
33:12:00
because you don't want to show it to
33:13:00
them and they
33:14:00
say they want it and you go wait a
33:16:00
minute I don't have really have it I
33:17:00
mean it would be kind of a waste but if
33:20:00
the people are doing that I can see that
33:21:00
happening but they should really be
33:22:00
ready so I'll I like that you gave that
33:24:00
bit of information you know you don't
33:27:00
want to waste anybody's time you want to
33:29:00
make sure you're ready yeah don't don't
33:31:00
walk in with a ziploc bag can you you
33:34:00
know your mom's oatmeal cookies he want
33:37:00
to make sure you've got packaging but
33:39:00
also you have the detail you know what
33:42:00
is the retail price that you want to
33:44:00
sell it for you know what are the
33:46:00
possible margins I mean even if you
33:48:00
don't have those details concrete you
33:50:00
need to make sure you understand like oh
33:52:00
this is gonna be a pack of 12 what is my
33:56:00
service if you need to have all of the
33:58:00
nutrition label in whatever
33:59:00
certifications you need to get that down
34:01:00
before you go into a bigger I want to
34:07:00
say a bigger supermarket chain but
34:09:00
really people are so nice in the
34:12:00
industry they truly are if you ask
34:14:00
around people will give you their advice
34:17:00
and most the time they'll probably give
34:19:00
it to you for free
34:21:00
and if anyone has any questions they can
34:24:00
reach out to me as well on LinkedIn or
34:26:00
on my Twitter and I'm happy to answer
34:28:00
any specific questions or sample your
34:32:00
food send it on over good I mean that
34:40:00
brings me into contact on LinkedIn
34:43:00
Twitter can you give out that info we're
34:44:00
gonna start wrapping up but it'd be
34:45:00
great if you could give that in for
34:47:00
awhile
34:47:00
yep if you just search for me on
34:49:00
LinkedIn its Angela flatlands and on
34:53:00
Twitter
34:55:00
I am grocer geek ah I love it I love it
35:00:00
and you're not kidding you love this
35:02:00
stuff
35:02:00
I am absolutely a geek for grocery money
35:07:00
well very good Angela thank you so much
35:11:00
for being on the show today I mean if
35:13:00
our viewers or our listeners are really
35:16:00
tuning you and they're gonna get some
35:17:00
good information being able to contact
35:18:00
you if they have some questions can
35:20:00
really help and I think that you gave
35:22:00
some great information out some real
35:24:00
deal you know industry-specific
35:27:00
with
35:28:00
very important for some of these
35:29:00
inventors because a lot of them come
35:30:00
into this thinking they know or they
35:32:00
don't know and being able to get that
35:34:00
little bit of information can can really
35:36:00
help a move their product along so I
35:38:00
really appreciate it yeah and as I said
35:41:00
I just wanna reiterate if anyone has any
35:43:00
questions about it I'm always happy to
35:46:00
be that resource if you have specific
35:49:00
package packaging questions questions
35:52:00
about retailers or any questions about
35:57:00
your product happy to answer anything
36:01:00
you have I live for this stuff it makes
36:04:00
makes my life being able to help out
36:06:00
anyone so happy happy to be here and you
36:10:00
know I'm glad you mentioned that and you
36:12:00
know I have 20 more questions you just
36:14:00
have so much more time maybe we can get
36:16:00
you back on the show but packaging
36:17:00
anyone packaging is so important and
36:20:00
you'll write I mean get in touch with
36:22:00
Angela or throw further design to or let
36:25:00
her see it right Angela in packaging is
36:26:00
so important yeah definitely there's a
36:29:00
lot of third-party companies that are
36:31:00
great that do a fantastic job with
36:33:00
packaging but I mean we all we all get
36:37:00
our suckers too walking past like a new
36:40:00
cookie on the shelf and you're like oh
36:43:00
look at that it's like a bright blue
36:44:00
beautiful package I gotta try this out
36:47:00
you know it's yeah it's it's it's
36:51:00
important but more important is probably
36:53:00
the flavor of your product or the
36:55:00
quality sender the samples is what you
36:59:00
say alright Angela thank you so much and
37:06:00
like I said maybe we can get you back on
37:08:00
the show we'll get some questions if I
37:09:00
get any questions here in Venice
37:10:00
launchpad I will certainly forward them
37:12:00
over to you I appreciate you being on
37:14:00
the show today and and lending a hand to
37:16:00
our inventors yes
37:17:00
I hope at least one thing I said helped
37:21:00
some of your food and beverage are non
37:23:00
foods anyone trying to get into grocery
37:25:00
or cease or I hope hope you took away
37:28:00
something nice gonna help there's no
37:31:00
doubt about it help me get a better idea
37:32:00
of of the best way to approach you know
37:36:00
a grocery store buyer it's very
37:37:00
important you only get one shot at this
37:39:00
so any bit of information
37:41:00
really really helps there's no doubt
37:43:00
about it okay alright everyone well
37:46:00
thank you for listening today I am
carmine Dennis co your host with Angela
37:51:00
flatland she helped us out today and if
37:53:00
you can please get a chance contact her
37:55:00
you could say banks just get a header on
37:57:00
on Twitter or get her on LinkedIn and
38:00:00
send her a message if you can and if
38:02:00
possible please go out to Google Play or
38:04:00
iTunes leave us a message
38:06:00
leave us a ranking let us know how we're
38:08:00
doing with our show and an honest
38:10:00
message or review will help us do a
38:13:00
better job and we appreciate you guys
38:14:00
listening in and we'll catch you next
38:16:00
time on inventors launchpad network
38:18:00
y'all take care