Intellectual Property for Inventors; What’s The Next Step For Your Idea?

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Celebrity Investor and Entrepreneur David Meltzer Discusses His No Fear Business Philosophy
September 4, 2018
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How to Launch My Toy Idea; Women in Toys Discusses How They Are Helping Inventors Conquer The Toy Industry While Empowering Women
September 13, 2018


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Podcast Notes

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hi everyone and welcome to the
0:03
inventor's launchpad network this is
0:05
common to disco and today we had one of
0:07
my favorite shows the goal big kobold
0:10
IP show and with me is my co-host mr. JD
0:13
Huebner what's happening JD what's up
0:15
out there hey carmine hey I'm doing good
0:18
don't really get this beautiful weather
0:19
up here in Seattle I'm looking at a
0:21
gorgeous week ahead sunshine
0:23
70s just what we're hoping for what we
0:25
work so hard for during the winter yeah
0:27
yeah not too many of those days up there
0:29
I'm I'm glad when you get some good well
0:31
I'm surprised that you even get to look
0:34
outside I mean you have so many things
0:36
going on I mean you got your show you
0:37
got the podcast here you got your
0:39
business I know you guys got a lot of
0:40
things happening I mean it's great that
0:42
you get to stick your head out and see
0:44
what's going on I have to my wife helps
0:48
me with that she works with me as you
0:49
guys may know we did we booked a long
0:52
weekend down in Oakland took three day
0:55
we can take the girls down there and I
0:57
had a great trip we have a fly down real
0:59
quick and stated with my brother East
1:02
Oakland was simple kind of like Oh
1:03
Oakland but now I mean it's actually
1:05
pretty cool very very you know holistic
1:09
very sustainable it's wonderful Lake
1:13
Merritt they had this huge farmers
1:15
market I mean really like the top top
1:17
end farmers market with really good food
1:19
music really nice scene down there I'm
1:22
it's not at all dangerous and scary so
1:25
there's a lot of really cool things
1:26
happening east of the bay I went to this
1:29
place called fairyland and our little
1:31
girls loved it it's kind of an
1:33
interesting place has been around since
1:35
the 50s
1:36
and so they've got really interesting
1:38
things you know Disney ish type rides
1:41
and slide things like that no that's
1:44
great yeah that's awesome no I'm I I
1:46
grew J I love the Oakland area it's it's
1:49
pretty cool then I also they got some
1:50
great coffee shops on mm-hmm yeah I
1:53
didn't know about the the market and you
1:55
know if that's new now I haven't been
1:56
there for several years but that out
1:59
next time I'm in the area but cool man
2:00
I'm glad you got to do that yeah I was
2:02
just got back from the hardware show out
2:05
in Vegas not sure when we're gonna be
2:07
airing this episode but I was over at
2:09
the hardware store out in Vegas it was
2:11
crazy was a great inventors showcase
2:13
they're sponsored by Home Depot United
2:15
inventors Association it was with
2:18
inventors man it was so cool I love this
2:21
show because a lot of the inventors
2:23
there have have gone over that hump you
2:25
know they they manufactured a small
2:27
amount or they're selling their product
2:28
and and they really just now trying to
2:30
get to that next level so it's nice
2:32
seeing those those end results as you
2:35
say you know you know you're doing the
2:37
the paperwork form you're doing the
2:39
patents and you know you always love to
2:40
see that they're going and moving
2:42
forward to those next levels so it's
2:45
really nice to visit those shows
2:46
absolutely yeah good deal we just got
2:49
caught up we're so busy at the spring I
2:51
had to get a chance to make it down that
2:52
we had one one of our employees down
2:55
there he said was just same thing you
2:58
just said this packed a lot of people
3:00
excited getting their products rolling
3:02
kind of putting things together beyond
3:04
the technology putting together actually
3:06
business plans and getting it out there
3:08
to people it's awesome and that's what
3:11
invention is all about is competition
3:13
and and new things always on the horizon
3:16
keeping people on their toes it's
3:18
awesome if we were just had these huge
3:20
conglomerates it would be really boring
3:22
we get we'd be just getting fed stuff
3:24
and so we need those companies out there
3:26
that are that are willing to push the
3:28
envelope and continually change and
3:30
challenge the status quo so it's really
3:33
cool to hear yeah I I spoke with as many
3:35
of the inventors as possible you know a
3:37
lot of them have mentioned the podcast
3:39
and they listened in and it was really
3:41
cool to hear that and and that they're
3:42
getting some information and you know
3:44
what's weird is acting like 80% of the
3:47
questions or the miscommunications that
3:50
were revolved around intellectual
3:52
property and things that they thought or
3:54
or things that were happening to them
3:56
and I was um I was happy that we have
3:59
this show out and that you know it is it
4:01
is helping because even at their level
4:04
at you know they're selling that they
4:06
still have those intellectual property
4:08
questions and and I was surprised at
4:09
that yeah it seems to be and I draw a
4:12
lot of parallels to tax with what we do
4:15
in people as they do business there they
4:18
know taxes out there the but they almost
4:20
I think my opinions they almost kind of
4:22
feel like it's oh you know ok I gotta do
4:24
this something I have to do but I'm
4:26
sorry wanted
4:27
but it's you know until you actually sit
4:30
down and talk with a CPA it can actually
4:32
be pretty exciting to learn about the
4:35
different ways you can save or avoid
4:36
liability similarly right you think oh
4:40
gosh lawyers attorneys I don't wanna get
4:41
involved IP it sounds so expensive and
4:43
sticky now you can actually use it to
4:46
leverage your business and make money
4:49
it's just one other things people are
4:50
afraid of they just had this notion that
4:53
no lawyers attorneys expensive in
4:55
trouble I don't want to deal with it I'm
4:57
just out here making money well you got
4:59
to slow down you got to stop and do that
5:01
you know take that next step
5:03
yeah I totally agree there's no doubt
5:06
you know a couple of things we talked
5:08
about with some of the inventors some of
5:11
them they were they were getting
5:14
knockoffs and they didn't know what to
5:15
do
5:16
you know they had talked to people and
5:17
different things and and they weren't
5:19
sure what to do with the knockoff some
5:21
of them had trade secret issues they
5:24
they weren't sure if they should go with
5:26
a full patent or not or and and you know
5:29
those are some things that that you know
5:31
even I'm not sure you know with me I was
5:33
just like you know that's something that
5:34
I'm gonna talk to JD about you know I
5:36
didn't want to give them the wrong
5:38
information cuz it's pretty tricky right
5:39
yeah there's some layers then we
5:42
wouldn't rolling that into our
5:43
presentation you know as you talked
5:45
about earlier we get out we do
5:46
presentations least three or four times
5:47
a month and I've been talking about
5:49
patents for quite a bit but this year I
5:51
started rolling in some trade secret law
5:53
into those presentations because it's
5:55
more more critical now people especially
5:58
in the software realm are looking to to
6:00
make sure that if they're going to
6:02
publicize something that is it's going
6:06
to be bad protectable but if you if
6:08
you've made that decision up front about
6:10
your technology you want to patent it
6:13
you got to make sure that yeah someone's
6:16
not going to be able to reverse-engineer
6:17
it so that's the big test okay so if
6:21
you're if you've got any tick and you
6:23
want to see whether you keep it in-house
6:24
or the you seek patent protection for it
6:26
you got to see whether it's reverse
6:28
engineer able and if it's not reverse
6:31
engineer well right think of Coca Cola's
6:34
recipe you know think of you know
6:37
Boeing's method for putting together
6:40
there
6:41
and fibre fuselage the actual method of
6:43
putting it together the sort of the end
6:45
product those are things that are that
6:48
are actually tougher to tell you know
6:50
how that thing was actually made and
6:51
they couldn't you can't quite make that
6:53
formula you know the right syrup and
6:55
sugar additives at the right temperature
6:57
to get the coke flavor you can't quite
6:59
tell how long that carbon fiber was
7:01
cured or how much adhesive was applied
7:03
to that to get the fibers to lay out
7:05
those are things that you can actually
7:07
keep this trade secrets within your own
7:09
company without seeking path protection
7:11
big beauty of that is that you can
7:14
protect it for as long as it remains
7:15
secret well beyond potentially the 20
7:19
years that you're allowed under patent
7:21
law and so there's a couple things that
7:23
goes with that right state state law
7:26
does govern trade secrets and the
7:28
ability to enforce them through
7:30
misappropriation now there was just
7:32
recently a new federal act the defend
7:34
trade secret Act that you can now go
7:36
interstate to seek Miss appropriators
7:39
but there's still laws on the books and
7:41
every state about trade secret what it
7:43
means about all the states of Mo's I
7:45
think it's 48 states out of 50 have
7:47
signed up to this uniform trade secrets
7:49
Act that governs the three elements well
7:52
what does it mean to actually have a
7:53
trade secret and it is you have to the
7:57
information cannot be readily
7:58
ascertainable it can't be generally
8:01
known
8:01
okay that's sort of an easy one the
8:04
second one is that you have to be able
8:05
to show and demonstrate your maintaining
8:07
secrecy either expending money you're
8:09
putting efforts into quit badge security
8:12
systems on the doors or you're investing
8:14
money to encryption software you're
8:16
putting in limitations and security and
8:19
passwords for certain access to
8:22
electronic documents you know those are
8:25
those would be good examples of ways
8:27
you're protecting it you know there's
8:28
something physical if there's actually a
8:30
you know handwritten recipe you know
8:32
that it's actually in a safe you know a
8:34
physical safe you've got you've
8:36
safeguarded it the third element is that
8:39
it must be economically valuable to your
8:41
company sort of interesting right but
8:44
the best test for this is that if it got
8:46
in the hands of a competitor that
8:48
competitor we would put it to use and
8:51
make money
8:51
virtually right away
8:54
so that's how you kind of tell whether
8:55
you've got a trade secret worth
8:56
protecting and within that is that title
8:59
of a question of hey once you sell if
9:01
you were to sell this
9:02
could someone figure it out how to do it
9:04
on their own if the answer is yes you
9:06
should seek patent protection for it but
9:09
if it's no and you're fairly certain
9:10
that's a no go ahead and keep it as a
9:13
trade secret that's really no reason for
9:15
you to seek patent protection for it so
9:19
so to me I know all of our vendors are
9:22
going well I I want my invention to be a
9:25
secret I mean obviously there are
9:28
certain things that you know as you said
9:31
you know if you're baking a new ashtray
9:34
there's you know you don't have to go
9:36
for that is there an extra cost or
9:38
they're extra levels you know to get
9:40
that trade secret verification well see
9:43
that's the thing that there's no
9:44
certificate there's no form there's no
9:46
document here is your trade secret right
9:49
and that's sort of an interesting
9:50
question no that doesn't exist it's if
9:53
you follow those three rules you have
9:55
the ability to enforce your trade secret
9:59
against a person that misappropriates
10:02
that's the term instead of infringement
10:03
someone that takes in the the trade
10:06
secret information and uses it for
10:08
purposes other than what you would agree
10:10
to so most cases it's a it's a you know
10:13
angry employee right someone that's
10:15
vindictive wants to start up their own
10:16
competitive business downloads about you
10:19
know a bunch of documents quits the next
10:21
day starts up their own competing
10:23
industry this actually happened right
10:26
very recently with the way Moe versus
10:27
uber case and self-driving vehicles she
10:31
settled for two hundred plus million
10:33
dollars Hooper had to pay that
10:36
complicated set of facts with the high
10:38
level is that high level engineer at way
10:41
mo which is alphabet right at Google's
10:43
company owned and so they had engineer
10:46
he worked for you know five ten years he
10:49
was a high-level executive engineer type
10:51
knows quite a bit he downloaded 15,000
10:54
documents and then quit two days later
10:57
to open up his competing company which
11:01
was then purchased by uber magically
11:02
within a month and so that looked really
11:05
bad right to over
11:07
for them just to buy out this engineer
11:08
kind of buying the brain of their
11:11
competitor for the self-driving car
11:13
space and they got stopped with the
11:15
lawsuit no way and what came after uber
11:17
and we all thought it was gonna go to
11:19
trial with all the attorneys were
11:20
watching it we're hoping to get some you
11:22
know judicial opinion on it but it's
11:24
settled
11:25
it's not a court for this and it was
11:26
disclosed at 259 so it's a great you
11:30
know the great feather in the cap - hey
11:31
if you do quality you do meet those
11:33
requirements you can certainly enforce a
11:37
trade secret and so within those
11:38
documents way mo had done their job to
11:41
at least limit limit the access they had
11:44
demonstrated they were not part of the
11:46
public knowledge and that they were
11:48
immediately valuable whatever that
11:49
information was surprising to a lot of
11:52
people when I do this discussion that
11:54
you know what can what's considered
11:56
trade secret and even something as
11:58
simple as a customer list yeah it's
12:01
trade secret
12:02
just business processes you know how you
12:04
do one thing how you deliver your
12:07
product or service is trade secret and
12:11
so it's important you know when you're
12:12
starting you know this how it kind of
12:14
bleeds over to employment law there's a
12:15
lot more I could talk about with that
12:18
you know it's and we'll get back to it
12:21
it's amazing to me that a high-level
12:23
executive would not know that you can
12:27
track everything that he downloaded I
12:29
mean how crazy it would he be I mean
12:33
it's insane to me that he mean he was
12:35
with the company for so long he should
12:36
know that a network and the IT guys or
12:39
IT department can track everything you
12:41
did yeah yeah they're like so there's a
12:43
lot more facts you know we could we can
12:45
actually probably do a whole series on
12:46
this and I could lay out the timeline
12:49
III think at least one layer facts is
12:51
that the individual the person that left
12:55
did not think they were trade secret of
12:58
course when we had a different yeah
13:01
opinion of that so yeah he's you've got
13:04
to be really careful err on the side of
13:07
this is trade secret right if you're
13:09
within a company and it's knowledge that
13:11
no one else has you've got to put two
13:14
and two together and you're right I
13:15
think there was just what are you
13:17
thinking kind of a thing you this is
13:18
this is pretty blatant you
13:21
you know yeah I agree should have known
13:24
paid the price
13:26
and actually the there is a parallel
13:29
criminal investigation
13:30
uber may be liable for a corporate
13:33
espionage you know type of thing so on
13:35
top of the you know the the civil
13:38
damages for the tort misappropriation
13:40
they may have some criminal issues as
13:42
well sure I mean they can lead áown load
13:46
fifteen thousand oh it's okay there well
13:52
yeah and you know part of what comes up
13:54
and not in my roadshows is as well
13:57
and I look around the room would you
13:58
know if one of your employees downloaded
14:01
a thousand documents yeah would you know
14:04
at all so are those systems in place are
14:06
you doing enough to safeguard it ensure
14:08
this sort of expense there but maybe
14:10
it's not too bad maybe it's worth
14:11
looking into there's a lot of it comes
14:13
down to not necessarily what you know
14:15
what you have in your tech it's how well
14:18
you've contracted with and know your
14:21
employees yeah is really what the trade
14:23
secret law comes down to yeah
14:25
and just let listeners know there's
14:27
there's a lot of soft words a lot of
14:29
platforms that you can you can put onto
14:31
your networks or your systems that would
14:34
alert you to employees downloading to
14:38
external drives or not that you want to
14:41
be the eagle eye but if you have that it
14:44
worry there are some software's out
14:46
there that are low cost I mean there's
14:47
some cool stuff out there but anyway
14:49
back to back to the trade secrets
14:51
probably one of the most famous things
14:53
that and you mentioned is coca-cola
14:54
secret formula I mean it has ever been
14:57
any kind of case that that an employee
15:01
tried to mimic it or stole it or I mean
15:03
this that's gotta be going what for over
15:05
a hundred years that yeah I don't mean
15:08
I'm sure there are had to happen I
15:09
should have one at least so I can ramble
15:11
it off but knowing well actually I think
15:14
there's rumored to have been a
15:17
ex-employee that went over write the
15:21
recipe went over to Pepsi and was like
15:24
hey mister or missus CEO I've got the
15:27
secret recipe and the interesting
15:31
response is the Pepsi president said get
15:34
away from me
15:34
go out and get out of here I don't want
15:37
that anywhere close to me because it's
15:40
obvious yeah and we're gonna get busted
15:42
right this is so that's sort of the the
15:45
tribal that sort of sort of the legend
15:48
around that is it no they don't you know
15:52
you have to be very careful so this goes
15:54
for companies that are receiving you
15:58
know competing companies high level
16:01
executives there are contracts in place
16:04
for those transfers and so it's
16:06
interesting to think cuz there is a
16:08
certain amount of what's called you know
16:09
knowledge or know-how that person can't
16:12
you know do the men in black you know of
16:14
mind eraser thing they've learned a lot
16:16
in their career and so you can they
16:18
can't leave everything at the old
16:20
company but you can actually itemize
16:23
certain things that will remain with you
16:26
know the company that they're leaving so
16:28
that everyone's you know on the same
16:30
page you can imagine this might have
16:33
happened with you know big CEOs moving
16:35
from like four Digium or even from
16:37
Boeing to Ford you know big high-level
16:40
companies there's maybe not direct
16:42
competitors but they have knowledge and
16:43
then do some industry research that
16:47
that's been done that would be
16:49
considered trade secret yeah that's a
16:52
good point I mean that's where you know
16:54
at some point where do you draw the line
16:55
I mean obviously you know you have
16:57
knowledge you have experience you say
16:59
you've worked with a company for twenty
17:00
years and and you bother that company
17:02
shuts down or you move on to another
17:04
company I mean there's II just can't
17:06
erase your mind but there is that gray
17:08
area where you know you have to really
17:11
decide who you are in the world or what
17:14
you can supply yeah absolutely yeah I
17:17
mean then it's a tougher that's part of
17:19
the decision you made you're you're
17:21
making even if you don't know it at the
17:23
time you're making a decision when you
17:25
come on as an employee that you're
17:28
you're agreeing to keep everything that
17:31
is confidential within that campaign
17:33
people don't usually think of that and
17:36
so that's why a lot of you know
17:37
consultants won't sign non-disclosure
17:41
agreements you know that's a lot of
17:43
folks that have kind of been around and
17:44
understand if they're exposed to a lot
17:46
of individuals and companies
17:49
they're gonna be out of business if
17:52
they've signed all these ndas because
17:54
now they can't they can't share what
17:56
they've learned right that's how you
17:58
become a better consultant for example
18:00
of course you wouldn't cite specifics
18:03
but you'd be able to that's how you stay
18:06
sharp it's how you build to know what's
18:07
best is to learn on the job but as
18:12
employee for sure no wise employer is
18:14
gonna make you sign that and you're
18:17
giving up quite a bit people don't
18:18
realize sometimes how much you're giving
18:20
up yeah well that's why it's important
18:22
obviously to speak with somebody like
18:24
yourself just to get a good idea good
18:26
grasp on it because it could maybe not
18:29
affect you you know in the near future
18:31
but in the long run if your company
18:33
starts doing well or you get bought out
18:35
like with uber bought that come I mean
18:37
it really it could take a quick turn on
18:39
you you bet you bet and it's probably
18:42
more applicable to those that are
18:44
switching mid-career you know maybe
18:47
you've been a solo or an inventor and
18:49
they're thinking about joining a company
18:51
you've got to make sure you consider
18:53
inventor ship and ownership and in those
18:56
employment contracts that almost always
18:58
is a clause about invention assignments
19:00
and when you're on the job working in
19:02
you know for what your boss has asked
19:03
you to do anything in that realm and
19:06
maybe even a little halo outside of that
19:07
would belong to the company you know
19:09
even if you're working off hours
19:11
quote-unquote if you're being paid
19:13
salary and your job is to create a new a
19:16
new internet that I watched this show
19:18
silicon I don't need to be a and and you
19:20
know the new internet and and you've
19:21
always had this passion II before
19:23
joining the company whoops
19:25
right anything that's improvement or
19:26
iterated from that would actually become
19:28
part of the company no one by the
19:30
company not you individually so you got
19:32
to make sure you're protecting yourself
19:34
you know when you're gonna go work for
19:36
somebody else do you ever you get that a
19:38
lot I know that in the pharmaceutical
19:40
industry I did some consulting and they
19:43
were really you know there were some of
19:45
these mad you know and that mad science
19:47
is these guys are super scientists they
19:49
had a little lab set up at their own
19:50
houses and we're doing things and and I
19:54
could see that being a conflict of
19:56
interest
19:57
sure gosh yeah you definitely compare
20:01
you know what
20:01
your job description yeah when you're on
20:03
the job you know what is your what is
20:06
your senior authority level asked you to
20:08
work on and if that's at all in
20:11
alignment with what you're trying to
20:13
invent off hours there's going to be a
20:15
conflict and then the company is gonna
20:16
go to claw that back and claim ownership
20:19
potentially see I'm used to you it's
20:22
sort of a bummer that as part of the
20:24
what you're giving up when you you know
20:26
take that nice safe salary or income you
20:29
know that's one of the big benefits for
20:32
the employers that they get you know the
20:34
intellectual capital of your employee so
20:37
yeah we definitely talk about that with
20:39
new new clients that are working
20:41
full-time it's a major consideration I
20:44
want to make sure we're talking to the
20:45
right person maybe we should be talking
20:47
to the general counsel yeah it's such a
20:50
fun conversation for the Inventure
20:51
anymore
20:52
yeah another question that came up at
20:56
the show and it's you know could be
20:57
something that went imited on time
20:59
anyway but something that came up was I
21:02
had a few gentlemen talk about how they
21:04
were getting selling their products but
21:08
then there was some knockoffs that were
21:09
on the market nude or the through Amazon
21:11
or other stores one gentleman had this
21:13
really cool LED light system and and
21:17
he's having a trouble with the actual
21:20
factory that produced his product and
21:23
they are selling it also they're making
21:26
it I forget it wasn't in China which you
21:28
know is automatic but it was outside the
21:30
US and that factory is making the
21:33
product and selling it externally and he
21:35
is just beside himself because I mean
21:38
it's just you know he feels like he has
21:40
no way just to stop that well I mean
21:43
yeah if you have are his rights granted
21:46
for a patent does he have a pet filing
21:49
at all do you know I believe he has
21:51
filed but it was mild yeah yeah so in
21:55
the state of pendency it is difficult
21:57
because you don't have any rights and
21:59
when you file a patent application
22:01
before the examiner's and the USPTO is
22:04
granted it or it allowed the invention
22:07
to issue you don't have any right you
22:10
your rights
22:10
so severe it's a challenge if certainly
22:13
as a challenge where you're waiting in
22:14
the pendency
22:15
period what we do for our clients as we
22:17
write extremely nasty letters that talk
22:22
about our prospective rights talk about
22:25
how how we've protected a certain scope
22:27
of rights under claims itemize it
22:29
identify VA you know it's sort of an
22:31
infringement analysis assuming that the
22:34
rights get granted putting those people
22:36
on notice that if they if they were to
22:39
continue out with this activity we bill
22:42
to get retroactive damages back to the
22:45
date of issuance and so and actually
22:47
before then right to the day they've
22:49
been using it because that they're
22:51
taking a big gamble that you're they're
22:54
kind of guessing well one either they're
22:55
gambling you're not going to get the
22:56
rights granted or that you're gonna give
23:00
up on your patent and they're not gonna
23:01
get caught so yeah that's one that
23:05
certainly is tough you know the way to
23:06
head that off up front no hindsight is
23:09
to make sure you're contracting with
23:10
people using enforceable contracts you
23:18
know sort of a given but if they're
23:20
overseas they get more complex
23:22
absolutely and you'd have to make sure
23:24
you you're working with counsel in those
23:27
other countries to do it right and so if
23:29
I was contracting with let's say India
23:32
you'd want to have it be binding in in a
23:37
court within India and the US attorney
23:39
is not qualified to do that
23:42
so that contract should be Co drafted
23:44
with an attorney in India you know
23:47
within the province and legs I don't
23:48
even know Indian law but it's given that
23:49
as an example and so if they breach that
23:52
contract which I'm sure this Act would
23:55
have been a breach right to to start
23:57
manufacturing another line of a
23:59
competing product and using the same
24:01:00
product sounds that could be a breach I
24:03:00
mean you'd want at least first craft the
24:05:00
contracts so that that scenario would be
24:06:00
a breach then once they bridged taking
24:09:00
the core right you've got to enforce it
24:11:00
and go right away so if they found out I
24:14:00
mean even if without you know patents
24:16:00
aside if they breached a contract that's
24:18:00
just contract law you got to go take
24:20:00
care of business so just be a little bit
24:22:00
smarter about engaging with parties and
24:25:00
makes things more difficult certainly if
24:27:00
you go overseas it's
24:28:00
the risks you take by having it be a
24:31:00
little cheaper right so perhaps
24:34:00
rethinking that having it be made here
24:36:00
in the States we keep things on
24:38:00
underneath one set of laws of course
24:41:00
states are different but they should be
24:42:00
a little easier to access and all that
24:46:00
so hope that helps
24:47:00
no definitely does and and I think you
24:50:00
have mentioned it in Prior shows and we
24:52:00
talked about it is uh you know to send
24:54:00
it and like you said get it get somebody
24:56:00
whether it's in India or here gets get
24:58:00
an attorney to draft uh not to go after
25:01:00
him right away draft the letter and and
25:03:00
let him know hey listen you're doing
25:05:00
this can't do it you know stop like you
25:07:00
said you know start businesslike be
25:09:00
businesslike but find out their
25:10:00
intention to totally yeah absolutely
25:13:00
yeah yeah I mean and if yeah a lot of
25:17:00
it's negotiable and you had a anyway I
25:21:00
could talk to do a whole show on how to
25:22:00
do you know that type of a contract you
25:26:00
know we don't how we used to do a lot
25:28:00
more of that where we're now focused on
25:30:00
you're just doing delivering the best
25:32:00
possible patent work and so we have we
25:34:00
have really focused our efforts at both
25:36:00
pads to work with inventors on
25:39:00
prosecuting and drafting their
25:41:00
applications we're really becoming
25:43:00
experts and I would say industry leaders
25:45:00
in that fee in that industry in
25:48:00
mechanical aerospace pharmaceutical
25:51:00
electrical certainly software so it's
25:54:00
really proud of that but we have
25:55:00
attorneys that we work with pretty
25:57:00
carefully outside of our firm I do
25:58:00
contracts like that and I have no
26:01:00
problem referring those out you know
26:03:00
because they do write all day every day
26:05:00
it's craft those agreements so yeah but
26:07:00
network of specialists is I think that's
26:09:00
the way law is going it's a really
26:11:00
powerful way to serve really high value
26:14:00
clients as long as the clients can
26:16:00
become more and more sophisticated over
26:17:00
asking better questions now and it's an
26:20:00
exciting time to be involved of course
26:22:00
in innovation and so we're building our
26:24:00
network of really strong people to refer
26:26:00
to you know whether it's manufacturing
26:28:00
and designing and shipping putting
26:31:00
contracts together getting investor
26:34:00
money is it's really fun to to work in a
26:37:00
really smart group like that you know
26:40:00
well it's have you said it's fast
26:42:00
you really need to be specific and
26:45:00
technical you only seems like you have
26:47:00
this window of time so you really need
26:49:00
to hand it off to somebody who does it
26:51:00
they know what they're doing there's no
26:52:00
delay those specific type of attorneys
26:55:00
that handle just this vertical or just
26:58:00
this specific topic you know that window
27:01:00
of opportunity before you need to just
27:04:00
get it done yeah totally absolutely I
27:07:00
walk just like you do we're just on the
27:09:00
weak here over on this end
27:10:00
but I say we to wrap this one up but I'm
27:13:00
gonna put a couple bullet points for for
27:15:00
next time we talk I want to I want to
27:17:00
bring out some examples of some trade
27:19:00
secret you asked about coke but have a
27:21:00
funder bring some case law it's gonna
27:23:00
bring some of these trade secret cases
27:25:00
to light and how people going to decide
27:27:00
whether it keep things in-house or not
27:29:00
and I want to bring in another example
27:31:00
of software then we could talk about
27:33:00
that as well but how did katas keep
27:35:00
instructure source code separately from
27:38:00
what you're seeking protection for under
27:40:00
patent law yeah that's awesome and it's
27:42:00
a it's kind of really exciting stuff I
27:44:00
mean everyone that we talked to all
27:46:00
every conversation goes back to some
27:49:00
type of IP question IP law because it's
27:53:00
so important and that's why I love this
27:54:00
show because it really is helping you
27:56:00
know so many people you know if they
27:57:00
don't need it right now they can go back
27:59:00
and you guys can go back and listen to
28:01:00
these shows also tune into J DS YouTube
28:04:00
page go on to bold IP comm go to a
28:07:00
YouTube page you have some great quick
28:09:00
shows some good information out there
28:11:00
that will really help hold today's show
28:15:00
yeah the bold Today Show said the you
28:17:00
our website and from the drop down under
28:21:00
publications you'll see the bull today
28:23:00
show over push that out via email now
28:25:00
yeah Thank You Carmen that we're looking
28:27:00
for any way that wants to know more
28:29:00
about patent specifically it's a daily
28:31:00
blast two or three minute lesson with a
28:34:00
nice challenge I've gotten really good
28:37:00
feedback on it so we're always looking
28:38:00
to improve it so please check that out
28:40:00
give us any feedback you have on it yeah
28:42:00
it's great show great show I listen to
28:44:00
it every morning driving to work as a
28:45:00
what a JD got to say today yeah
28:48:00
this week's off a licensing we're deep
28:50:00
diving on licensing and we did have
28:52:00
front payments today so
28:54:00
yeah that's cool yeah very good man so
28:58:00
and even listeners out there are we
29:00:00
thank you JD for JD for myself we thank
29:02:00
you for listening go on out to I said as
29:04:00
I said bold IP comm check out JD's
29:07:00
websites pretty awesome site that sign
29:09:00
up get his free book and go to his
29:12:00
YouTube page and he's got a lot of
29:14:00
information out there if you can please
29:15:00
go on out to Google Play or iTunes leave
29:18:00
us a review leave us in rating if
29:21:00
possible and a review let us know how
29:23:00
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29:24:00
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29:26:00
that's how kind of we gauge how we're
29:28:00
doing here at eventers launchpad and
29:31:00
both IP and we'll catch you next time on
29:33:00
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