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Why did Ashley create Mad Moves? "I started dance at a young age and it continued to be a big part of my life growing up. Mad Moves combines three of my passions -- dance, toy/game design and making people smile. I can't wait to see the world getting up, getting down and laughing out loud with Mad Moves!"

How does Ashley Move & Shake? Ashley is the founder and president of Brandberry (a brand creation and licensing agency). She's constantly on the road pitching, networking and bringing her big ideas to life. Ashley also serves as the president of the global non-profit, Women In Toys, Licensing & Entertainment.

How did Mad Moves come to be? It started as a simple idea to create a game that would get people up & moving. Our team, families, friends and every play tester has pushed Mad Moves to a whole new level and we can't wait for you to play!

Click here and back her Kickstarter Campaign!

Watch the podcast here!

 

Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
Oh
0:01
hi everyone and welcome to the
0:03
inventory's launchpad Network I am
0:06
carmine danesco your host for today's
0:08
show and today on the launchpad we have
0:12
the founder and president of brand Barry
0:16
she's also the president of women in
0:18
toys she's an inventor a brand creator
0:20
she's an entrepreneur a true visionary
0:22
toy lover and it's my pleasure to have
0:25
her on the show her name is Ashley Mady
0:28
lastly how are you doing today I'm doing
0:30
great thank you for having me
0:32
excellent thanks for being on the show
0:33
today I know you're really busy you have
0:35
a lot of stuff going on you even have a
0:36
Kickstarter program that I'm sure you're
0:38
running and we'll get into that a little
0:40
later but I did want to just get into
0:43
your love of toys when did that start
0:46
well I think it started when I was a kid
0:49
I've always been a toy collector and
0:51
really when I was a kid a huge stuffed
0:54
animal lover ah okay did you have like
0:58
that you know the kids need the stuffed
1:00
animals all over your room yes and I was
1:03
really particular about how I would
1:05
organize them all so my mom thinks that
1:09
there were signs signs very early on in
1:14
in what I would become I think she just
1:18
thought it was very odd well no I mean
1:22
you know a lot of people obviously they
1:24
love toys they play with toys as a kid
1:25
but you carried it over into a business
1:28
which is just awesome I mean being able
1:30
to have fun in a kid and then taking
1:32
that into the business world what's the
1:35
differences I mean I know you have fun
1:36
at work you know and we talked before
1:39
the show but obviously mixing business
1:41
and fun you know there's probably those
1:43
fine lines that you have to draw some
1:47
days I forget that there's actually a
1:49
difference I work pretty much always so
1:52
there's not really a clear separation
1:54
between when I'm working and playing and
1:58
as I'm you know eight and a half years
2:01
into my company the lines are completely
2:05
blurred lines there's no line used to
2:09
try to draw them and yeah forget about
2:11
that well you know when you say work all
2:13
the time if your
2:14
having fun you know the deal you're not
2:16
really working so that's why you know
2:18
you don't mind working all the time
2:19
probably exactly sometimes I'm supposed
2:21
to be doing something that seems like it
2:23
would be fun and actually I'm wishing
2:25
that I could be working on that project
2:27
or new ideas so it's really no I I could
2:32
see that happening I mean I try to get
2:34
out of work and go play and do things
2:36
myself but being able to work in the
2:38
industry is awesome but you know it the
2:42
industry itself to me it seems pretty
2:44
competitive though very very very
2:47
competitive every industry that I play
2:50
in is highly competitive toys
2:53
Entertainment Cosmetics they're serious
2:56
yeah yeah yeah I saw that you know I was
2:58
doing a little bit of research and you
3:00
work in the cosmetic industry candy type
3:03
industry and obviously the toys now this
3:08
is something that you've taken I know
3:09
you have your own inventions but is it
3:12
also something that I know brand Berry
3:14
you you rep other products is that
3:17
correct yeah from time to time I'll see
3:20
something that I fall in love with or I
3:22
feel I can improve it significantly or
3:25
have the right relationships to broker a
3:28
deal and I'll take that on yeah well you
3:32
know it's good that you say it because I
3:33
mean everyone needs help I mean you
3:35
probably run into inventors and develop
3:36
product developers and things they want
3:38
to do kind of everything themselves but
3:40
the the contacts and the relationships
3:43
are truly almost the most important to
3:45
me yes those are the most valuable even
3:47
if you have a great idea to get your
3:50
product in front of the right people
3:51
like to do deals with their friends and
3:53
it's really difficult if you have it
3:55
fostered those relationships yeah I mean
3:59
there's no doubt I mean you know a buyer
4:01
or someone who's gonna take on a product
4:03
they take a real chance on a product and
4:05
their vendors our listener base realize
4:08
that any time you even yourself you take
4:10
on a product it's a lot of work that
4:11
goes into turning it around and
4:14
switching it over and making sure that
4:15
product is fusible enough to get out
4:17
into the market exactly
4:24
I mean how how often I mean you probably
4:26
see so many products and I mean you know
4:28
you know when we talked to inventors
4:30
even here at the launch pad they're so
4:33
enthusiastic they they fall in love
4:35
they're mostly attached to their product
4:37
and we get mostly attached to them too
4:40
we hear their stories we hear how much
4:42
love I may put into them and you know we
4:46
want to help as much as possible and and
4:48
I feel just how you know from talking
4:49
with you you know you probably get
4:51
mostly attached to these ideas also yes
4:53
I've also learned that you can't get too
4:56
attached to them because you never know
4:59
the fate of a brand that I think that's
5:01
why I I have so many because I've
5:04
learned to love them and nurture them
5:06
but also realize that you know you
5:09
celebrate when you do a licensing deal
5:11
you celebrate again when the product
5:13
hits shelf but you needed to stay on
5:15
shelf for a couple years and really a
5:19
lifetime and that's not easy there's a
5:22
million things that could go wrong in
5:24
that in that process and you're if
5:28
you're if you're lucky you have an
5:30
evergreen brand but it's prayer yeah no
5:32
oh definitely I mean even even like you
5:35
said there's products that even the big
5:37
guys the big companies you know they
5:38
develop themselves and you know it just
5:41
doesn't work and so so I totally agree
5:44
with you huh I mean there there are
5:47
steps to take obviously to get a product
5:50
on on the shelf or or a licensing deal
5:53
what's some of the that you have seen
5:55
some of the I don't want to say
5:57
worst-case scenarios but something an
5:59
inventor should not do you know right
6:02
off the bat or when they're meeting with
6:04
with the buyer or potential licensee I
6:07
would say I mean protect yourself but
6:12
then also be open to sharing I would say
6:15
a lot of inventors are more scared than
6:17
the next and if you're too scared to
6:19
show your idea to someone then you'll
6:21
never have the shot of actually doing a
6:24
deal so you know protect what you can
6:27
but also know that you you need other
6:30
people to to participate in bringing
6:34
your idea to life and if you make it too
6:36
hard for them sometimes
6:37
it just closes a lot of doors yeah it
6:41
seems like you know you are you're right
6:43
I mean the first thing you know an
6:44
inventor will call us or a contact and
6:46
it probably happens to you will you sign
6:47
an NDA and you're going wait a minute
6:49
wait are you asking to be on a podcast
6:51
and share with the world you know even
6:57
somebody like yourself who sees so many
6:59
products it's kind of hard for you right
7:00
off the bat to sign a nondisclosure
7:01
agreement or you know go into an
7:04
agreement type you know document where
7:06
you haven't even heard about the product
7:08
yet and it kind of problem I don't know
7:09
the person either so if you just
7:12
contacted me out of the blue and then
7:14
you want me to do all these formalities
7:16
and I don't even know you
7:19
yeah that's a lot to be giving my time
7:24
yeah it's true begin and that's what
7:27
kind of what our you know our listeners
7:29
and our ventas we always work on is they
7:32
they can't let fear Drive them like you
7:36
had said earlier not show your idea let
7:39
the fear drive the person you're trying
7:40
to show it to her way right it's that
7:43
fine line right there teens love enough
7:46
to be interested and that's it
7:48
to see more yeah no idea and the the toy
7:52
industry you probably see a lot of
7:55
different products they're like a season
7:56
four different types of toys that you
7:58
see I would say there's a bunch of
8:03
cycles in the industry in all different
8:05
categories so whether it's action
8:07
figures or small dolls it cycles in and
8:10
there's no not a true predictability of
8:12
when trends are gonna go in and out but
8:16
voids present themselves and suddenly
8:19
all the the adventure community knows
8:21
and everyone's scrambling to you know
8:23
fill that gap and it's just a race to
8:25
who cracks it first it is and you know
8:28
new inventors don't realize of that how
8:31
long it takes to not only develop a toy
8:33
test it make the toy and then get it to
8:36
market I mean there's it there's a long
8:38
cycle there so being able to hit the the
8:40
timing is so important also yeah I think
8:43
that's a big thing to understand however
8:45
long you think it's gonna take to get
8:46
your product on shelf maybe add three
8:48
years to that I've had
8:51
I've had brands where I've done
8:52
licensing deals or options with
8:54
companies they'll sit on it for a year I
8:56
get it back at to go find another
8:58
company signed a deal they'll sit on it
9:00
for a year and then you know another
9:01
company brings it to life a year later
9:04
and suddenly it's three years and that
9:07
actually happens more frequently and I
9:11
think most people know wow that's
9:14
amazing so that they the brand that you
9:17
bring it likes it yes what this product
9:20
and then I guess the internal craziness
9:23
of a company gets involved and it just
9:25
sits on the Shelf yeah that happens
9:26
really frequently I would say it happens
9:29
a lot in the toy community because these
9:32
companies have an appetite or they
9:34
always like what they see and I think
9:36
they do have the interest in believing
9:38
that they can do it but then you know
9:41
another brand in their portfolio blows
9:42
up or they have corporate structure
9:44
changes or the the person that fell in
9:47
love with your idea in the first place
9:49
is no longer with the company so there's
9:51
a million things that are completely out
9:55
of your hand that that could change the
9:57
fate of your brand when your licensing I
9:59
guess if you do it yourself
10:00
you have a lot of things that you can
10:02
control but at the same time there are
10:05
other uphill battles that you have to
10:07
fight I agree it seems and again you
10:10
know better than I do and this is in the
10:12
toy industry it's so vast it's so big
10:14
yes Ison seemed to me would be the way
10:16
to go cuz for me to make a toy and try
10:19
to get into the market I think it would
10:20
be pretty tough it's definitely very
10:23
hard with all the testing requirements
10:24
and and just it's hard to pitch to a
10:27
retailer when you're a one-off item and
10:29
or even if you have one line but if you
10:32
have a hundred lines and you're pitching
10:34
to retailers and you're setting up the
10:35
supply chain accordingly it makes sense
10:37
so for us as a company I love the
10:40
creative most so we'll manufacture if we
10:43
need to and we believe in something and
10:45
we you know want to we just know that
10:48
it's gonna work and it's a timing thing
10:50
but most of the time licensing is but
10:54
the strongest way to market yeah yeah
10:56
and and they like you said having a
10:58
company that that's what they do and it
11:00
really frees you up to start the
11:02
creation process again exactly I love
11:04
I love the creative side of the business
11:06
of the operations when when the company
11:09
has a sound infrastructure I look gladly
11:11
give them creative ideas to put to good
11:13
use
11:13
that's great and it and I know we talked
11:16
earlier you work with some obviously
11:18
creative people the toy industry to me
11:19
it has to be one of the most creative
11:21
industries because it's it's so
11:23
competitive but it's it's a lot of fun
11:24
it opens creativeness I would think yeah
11:27
I think it attracts a lot of creatives
11:30
and it's so trend based that's something
11:33
that you do one season is no longer
11:34
relevant the next so it has a really
11:36
deep thirst for constant innovation
11:39
which is why I love it and I keep
11:45
creating yeah well again you know I
11:47
commend you're doing a great job I mean
11:50
you got some great products out there
11:51
and you're helping other people which is
11:54
is awesome being able to take that
11:56
knowledge and experience that you got
11:57
you still keeping your creativeness and
11:59
having other people bring their products
12:01
to you I mean it must be a great feeling
12:03
to be able to help other inventors or
12:05
other product developers yeah it's fun
12:07
and there were a lot of people that
12:09
helped me along the way as well and
12:10
showed me the path so I do everything I
12:13
can to pay forward to the industry that
12:16
I love yeah well a lot of a lot of our
12:19
guests come on they say they there's no
12:22
way that they could have done it by
12:23
themselves you know and you don't know
12:29
everything I mean it's just it just it's
12:31
it would it would probably never come to
12:34
market if you tried to do everything
12:35
yourself it just wouldn't work right I
12:37
agree
12:37
or you would just be moving so much
12:39
slower you know it's appends you can do
12:41
it yourself I'm gonna take you 10 years
12:42
or you could do it as a team and you
12:46
might be out in a year yeah no there's
12:48
no doubt about where you guys located
12:49
out of we're located in Delray Beach
12:51
Florida although I feel like I'm on an
12:53
airplane most of us most of the time
12:57
yeah you do a lot of traveling do you go
12:59
to the the toy shows and yes I do the
13:02
full circuit pretty much pretty much
13:04
every every show domestically and then
13:06
internationally I switch it up and I
13:09
know did you speak at a lot of events
13:11
also yes I I do a lot through women in
13:15
toys licensing and entertainment and the
13:18
of the organization and we have events
13:20
at almost every major trade show and
13:23
beyond
13:24
that's great tell us a little bit about
13:25
the woman toys which I'm fascinated
13:26
about I think it's all organization to
13:29
start so we call ourselves wit and it's
13:33
a professional networking group for
13:34
women working in the toy licensing and
13:37
entertainment industry is where we can
13:39
connect come together and really
13:41
accomplish great things so we have tools
13:42
resources panels events some of the
13:46
biggest companies in the industry are
13:47
involved from Mattel to Hasbro Disney
13:52
Nickelodeon it's it's really tremendous
13:54
we have inventors entrepreneurs students
13:57
we really run the gamut from all aspects
14:00
of the industry that's cool now you
14:02
any-any
14:03
you know obviously and can anyone join
14:07
that's an inventor or house yes everyone
14:09
can join that has an invention or a
14:12
product I would say you know we're
14:14
pretty toy specific but there are a lot
14:17
of tools and resources that I think any
14:19
inventor could really benefit from in
14:22
disjoining that's cool how do I would
14:25
and we could talk about it later but how
14:26
would someone get involved or find out
14:29
you can become a member it's a hundred
14:32
and fifty dollars you get a woman in
14:34
toys calm and that unlocks all the
14:37
opportunities and and then the key is
14:39
getting involved it's like a gym
14:41
membership if you don't use it you're
14:42
not going to benefit from it but if you
14:44
start you know using the resources or
14:47
getting involved in committees there are
14:49
incredible things that it can unlock it
14:52
seems like you have to have fun if you
14:53
join this organ
14:55
yes that would be the number one rule
14:56
haha and help each other and celebrate
14:59
accomplishments again you know I'm not
15:03
trying to sell these or they put four
15:05
for that fee it's kind of a drop in the
15:08
bucket
15:08
yeah it's you're crazy don't spend that
15:13
money we just had an empowerment day at
15:15
fault oh preview where it was free to
15:18
our members and you got the opportunity
15:21
to pitch to the Walmart buyers we had
15:25
all the heads of adventure relations in
15:27
from has Burroughs
15:30
master play monster Jazwares and this is
15:34
a once a lifetime opportunities info
15:36
sessions panel and to think that's
15:40
available is yeah
15:43
it's crazy and there should be more
15:45
people in the room at that event for
15:47
sure oh just you're just talking about
15:50
that I was saying well not even that I
15:56
mean like you said I mean people need to
15:58
get involved they got to see that that
15:59
kind of ability it doesn't come along I
16:03
mean if you had the ability to pitch to
16:04
anyone in the first place but having all
16:07
those people in the room I mean just
16:09
even be in the room don't even pitch
16:10
stand in the room and have a chance
16:12
meeting with one person that's there and
16:15
then all everyone who is working the
16:18
room are our volunteers most of them are
16:21
executives of the industry so it's it's
16:23
just this existed when I first got
16:26
started in the industry it would have
16:27
changed everything yeah isn't it
16:30
unbelievable when you look back you say
16:32
you know you have to take advantage of
16:34
opportunity when they present themselves
16:35
but when you start out you don't even
16:37
know how to take advantage right you
16:40
know and and that's where an
16:42
organization like what comes in because
16:44
it doesn't have to be just you you have
16:45
a whole group of people shaking you're
16:47
going get in there yeah motivating you
16:50
to do more that's great well that's
16:53
awesome I do I wanted to talk a little
16:55
bit about that because again I think
16:56
that all women inventors not in just in
16:59
a toy industry I think they do a great
17:01
job and we we work with many many women
17:03
here that come in they're super
17:04
organized they're ready to go they know
17:06
what they want and it makes it easier
17:09
for us to make their products tell us a
17:14
little bit about some of the products
17:15
that that you've created at when earlier
17:18
in your career you worked on some of the
17:20
some really big brand products also did
17:23
you were able to carry that into when
17:25
you started your own business right yes
17:27
so I I got my start working for a toy
17:29
company working on some really big
17:31
brands like Care Bears and Hannah
17:34
Montana Disney property and you know it
17:36
got my got my toes wet on that side of
17:38
the business that was really licensing
17:40
focused and then came up with a
17:42
proprietary brand while
17:44
working within that company so I guess
17:46
I'm a bit of an entrepreneur and that
17:49
led me to a marketing position within
17:52
the companies so I got to wear a lot of
17:53
hats observe a lot of different aspects
17:56
of the business and then when I went out
17:58
on my own
17:59
realized I wanted to create brands
18:01
franchises invent and really be that the
18:04
IP owner and creator I had a deep
18:08
passion for that side of the business
18:09
and started working with some big brands
18:12
on brand extension I thought you know
18:13
what I want to learn the process and I
18:15
want to learn from the best maybe I'm
18:18
not quite ready to create my own
18:19
original IP but let me learn the entire
18:22
industry I think that might be more
18:24
important to build relationships so I
18:26
spent the first couple years in business
18:28
as an agent really helping other brands
18:31
expand and and grow their business and
18:34
also doing a lot of service based work
18:37
where as an example we we did a lot of
18:41
creative work getting private label
18:42
development for a three-year period for
18:44
its sugar the largest specialty candy
18:47
retailer to be inside a retailer we had
18:49
office space there you need to be inside
18:51
a reseller for three years and observe
18:53
the process those things are are
18:56
life-changing in terms of now when I
18:59
create I can create with such a grounded
19:01
approach to my concepts and really
19:04
understand how the insides of a
19:06
manufacturer operates a retailer
19:08
operates and I think has led to much
19:11
stronger and better ideas that's amazing
19:14
I mean being able to like you said be
19:16
inside and see how what works and what
19:18
doesn't work is important too you know
19:22
when you say do you see hey you know
19:24
look at how much waste there is or we
19:26
look at you know was it so when you
19:28
broke out on your own you knew what you
19:29
didn't want to do but also you had all
19:31
that knowledge and experience that's
19:32
that is life-changing is pretty cool
19:34
yeah it's been a it's been a fun journey
19:37
and I you know I'm at a place where
19:38
doing things I love I'm working on
19:41
product that I enjoy with people that I
19:43
enjoy working with and it's awesome
19:46
yeah that is it's really cool now I see
19:48
behind you you have a product that
19:51
you're working on and I know that that
19:53
you're gonna be running or you are
19:54
running a Kickstarter campaign on
19:56
once you give us a little bit info on it
19:57
yeah so mad moves is a crazy Sundance
20:01
game we launched our Kickstarter
20:02
campaign exactly two weeks ago so we're
20:05
half way into our campaign we're doing a
20:07
30-day campaign it's all-or-nothing so
20:09
we need all the support that we can get
20:12
to bring bad boobs to life and it's a
20:14
party game and it's inspired by dance
20:17
throughout my childhood dance is a big
20:19
part of my life and getting up and
20:21
getting moving is one of my ways that I
20:25
I'm inspired and find my best creative
20:28
ideas so this is really a confluence of
20:30
my childhood passions and my adult
20:33
interests in toys and games and it's
20:37
awesome you you might end up limb bowing
20:39
like a flamingo or doing ballet like a
20:42
t-rex or tap-dancing like a robot so you
20:45
spend a spinor pick up a card dance out
20:47
a hilarious combination and the other
20:49
players try to guess what you're doing
20:51
well it's it's pretty cool I mean my
20:54
daughter constantly dancing doing stuff
20:59
around the house and with technology now
21:00
with their phone or you know different
21:02
apps that are out there and things like
21:03
that when you were telling me about this
21:05
product I thought it was great timing
21:06
for this process really is what's the
21:09
kind of the age group that you think
21:10
would be good for or all ages I really
21:12
say this is a six and up game but the
21:15
really interesting aspect to mad moves
21:17
is it's different no matter who you play
21:19
with so you could be playing it as a
21:20
family game and it it's approach one way
21:23
when a group of friends get together
21:24
it's something different playing with
21:25
your college friends late at night and
21:27
it's a totally different game yes it is
21:31
well when you were talking about I
21:32
thought now be awesome at my daughter's
21:34
party yes it's a great party game a
21:37
great icebreaker to I've I've had people
21:40
play that they don't know each other and
21:42
then suddenly they're laughing and
21:44
having fun very very quickly well I'm
21:47
gonna have to donate and get one here at
21:49
the officer yeah no we're definitely
21:55
gonna donate when we were talking about
21:57
before the show I think it's great a
22:00
really cool game anything that gets kids
22:02
moving like you said gets them
22:04
interacting and laughing yeah it's so
22:07
important and it's great to see I love
22:09
I again that my kids play what to have
22:12
fun with and I can hear him laughing
22:13
it's just such a great feeling yes it's
22:15
a great feeling I think that's why I why
22:17
I do what I do I like that the end
22:19
product makes people laugh and smile and
22:22
and although if you look across our
22:24
portfolio everything seems very
22:27
different I think they all have a
22:29
similar Sensibility mm in that respect
22:31
yeah yeah I mean have you seen the way
22:35
kids interact with toys and games over
22:39
the years I mean you know from say the
22:41
80s 90s or 2000s as phones and
22:44
Technology and things like that I mean
22:46
it seems like there's still toys and
22:48
games out there but is there a
22:50
difference in the way they interact with
22:51
them I think so I think that their their
22:54
focus is so all over the place where you
22:58
know a kid I when I was a kid you could
23:01
get bored now there's always something
23:05
that you could do or watch to occupy
23:07
your time so so just the level of
23:10
holding your interest for a longer
23:12
period of time is harder you're always
23:14
multitasking and the TV's on you're also
23:17
on your phone and then you're also
23:18
playing a game and like these are things
23:20
that they they all didn't used to
23:24
coexist together now they do yeah yeah
23:27
they do you're exactly right there you
23:29
know interacting and what the toys and
23:31
games that we get for our kids we we try
23:34
to get them away from their technology
23:35
just for a little while and if a game or
23:39
a toy has that ability I think it's a
23:41
huge hit you know really important to be
23:45
able to do that and spend family time
23:46
and and that's why I loved I wanted a be
23:49
on the show because I think that the way
23:50
you're approaching the technologies and
23:53
games that you implement it really is
23:55
improving you know family life - I agree
23:58
as brings people together increase in
24:01:00
this instance it creates a lot of
24:03:00
memories - like you're gonna remember
24:04:00
you know grandma Lim bowing like a
24:07:00
zombie it's just you know one of those
24:10:00
things that every holiday event
24:16:00
how do you guys I would love to be at
24:18:00
your office when you're testing out
24:19:00
these
24:22:00
there have been some hilarious days of
24:25:00
you know figuring out there's there's
24:27:00
three piles in the game
24:28:00
people actions and animals and we had to
24:30:00
pick which ones would make the cut which
24:32:00
ones wouldn't so we of course have to
24:34:00
dance out all the combinations and try
24:36:00
to guess and so funny that is funny um
24:40:00
does it seem like board games and things
24:43:00
like that I know that like the dance
24:44:00
game and things like that does this seem
24:46:00
like board games are still you know top
24:48:00
of the charts for for some families yeah
24:51:00
and I think if you look at the industry
24:53:00
trends they are selling really well and
24:56:00
that category as a whole is is
24:58:00
performing and expanding so I think the
25:01:00
consumers have let the industry know
25:03:00
that they want it and and on Kickstarter
25:06:00
two games are doing incredible on that
25:10:00
platform I there's a few games that have
25:11:00
raised you know millions of dollars on
25:14:00
Kickstarter which is incredible is it
25:17:00
that it's kind of unfathomable I mean to
25:20:00
think that you know and and I believe
25:23:00
that your Kickstarter program that that
25:24:00
much money can be raised online in 30
25:28:00
days that's something that you work
25:31:00
really hard to solve a million-dollar
25:32:00
order of you know any product and
25:35:00
usually you don't Psalter that inventory
25:37:00
in 30 days usually you know they're
25:39:00
ordering it's a pentagon hassle right
25:42:00
they're planning an allocation teamwork
25:44:00
so they're not planning to to move those
25:46:00
units in 30 days looks at depending on
25:50:00
what it is but I agree with you and
25:53:00
that's why when I see these numbers on
25:55:00
some of these products I wonder how the
25:57:00
heck are they filling these orders and
25:59:00
you know and when it becomes to where
26:01:00
it's expected yes scary in a way agree
26:08:00
no so anyway it's it's it's great i I
26:11:00
wanted to get you on the show I was so
26:13:00
glad that we gave to get some time with
26:14:00
you I know that you're like I said I
26:16:00
know you're jet-setting around you're
26:17:00
busy you're talking to with speeches
26:19:00
where's the next next place that you're
26:21:00
going to be doing your talk I am flying
26:24:00
to New York at the end of this month we
26:26:00
have a woman in toys event at
26:28:00
Nickelodeon's offices we have a internal
26:31:00
chapter there so we're going to be
26:33:00
working with them on our plane
26:36:00
and for the remainder of the year doll
26:37:00
of 2018 wow that's some fun stuff
26:41:00
very bad that's great I'm originally
26:44:00
from New York so going into the city
26:46:00
it's it's crazy but it's a lot of fun
26:48:00
once you get there yeah I love it there
26:50:00
I like I usually end up there once a
26:52:00
month or so Wow no there you go that's
26:55:00
possible well listen Tom again
26:58:00
I'm glad glad glad that you were able to
27:00:00
make it on the show today super
27:02:00
impressed by everything that you've done
27:03:00
and all that you're going to be doing
27:05:00
we'll keep the Kickstarter in mind we'll
27:07:00
be pushing it out getting some people
27:09:00
for you hopefully to to purchase the
27:12:00
product and and help out that
27:13:00
Kickstarter routine and also is uh you
27:17:00
know again just what's the easiest way
27:19:00
for people to china seek you out just go
27:21:00
to your website yeah what website or
27:24:00
even LinkedIn I'm a I like to connect I
27:27:00
think that I'm pretty open to meeting
27:31:00
everyone and then also women in toys
27:33:00
become a member that's probably the best
27:35:00
way to interact with me in a more
27:38:00
hands-on fashion well very good I'm
27:40:00
hoping that we'll get some people I
27:43:00
think though women toy is an awesome
27:45:00
organization hopefully they'll get some
27:47:00
people who to join up and I think it's
27:51:00
been a great great show very informative
27:53:00
all the stuff that you have going on and
27:55:00
for today's show for our listeners out
27:57:00
there if we have some questions or if
27:58:00
you have some questions for Ashley go
28:00:00
ahead out there crabber on linkedin
28:02:00
brand berry calm check out the toys or
28:06:00
the things that you've been working off
28:07:00
you have an idea for a toy please reach
28:09:00
out to her or she'll let you know right
28:11:00
away you know if she can help or not I
28:14:00
think it'd be awesome you know for some
28:16:00
of our listeners to be able to send you
28:17:00
some questions or send you their ideas
28:19:00
it would be really cool happy to help
28:21:00
and check out mad moves you'll
28:23:00
definitely get on got mad moves
28:26:00
definitely get out there I think it's a
28:28:00
great game you know here at the launch
28:29:00
pad will definitely be donate and I want
28:31:00
to get that in the office here for our
28:33:00
next office party awesome can't wait to
28:35:00
see video of that it's a video only for
28:39:00
you alright nicely thank you so much for
28:43:00
being on the show today for our
28:45:00
listeners out there thank you check out
28:47:00
our rest
28:48:00
our podcast if you can go on out to
28:50:00
iTunes or Google Play leave us a review
28:52:00
or rating it will certainly help and
28:54:00
thank you again for listening and we'll
28:56:00
catch you next time on the inventors
28:58:00
Launchpad Network