Patent Law; Intellectual Property Attorney Jim Patterson Speaks About The Work He’s Done in Patent Law

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Jim Patterson is a founding partner of Patterson Thuente IP. In his 30-plus years of experience, Jim’s practice has encompassed all aspects of intellectual property law, including patent prosecution, licensing, dispute mediation, and litigation. A recognized leader in the legal community, Jim works with mid-size and large, regional technology companies, as well as Fortune Global 500 corporations, providing them with senior-level strategic counsel and ensuring that their patent dollars are spent wisely. His work for clients, both domestic and international includes:

IP portfolio management
Competitive analysis
Offensive and defensive strategy development
Freedom-to-operate (FTO) opinions
Clearance searches
Enforcement strategy and analysis
Global market-protection strategies
Inventor issue resolution
As a leader and mentor within the firm, Jim imposes a client-first philosophy, emphasizing quality work, responsiveness and teamwork.
Watch the podcast here!
 

Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
0:00
hi everyone and welcome to the inventors
0:03
launchpad Network
0:04
I am carmine danesco I welcome all of
0:07
you listeners out there I appreciate you
0:09
listening in if you could possibly go
0:11
out to iTunes or Google Play
0:13
leave us a nice review leave us an
0:14
honest review let us know how we're
0:16
doing and if there's some sub nation you
0:18
want us to hear about or you would like
0:20
to hear about it would be great for you
0:22
to let us know today my co-host mr.
0:25
Warren Tuttle for the tunnel innovation
0:27
show we had a great show planned I
0:29
haven't really spoken with Warren this
0:31
week and want to catch up with him to
0:32
see what's going on hey Warren you over
0:34
there I am oh man I caught you up there
0:38
that's awesome very good how's it going
0:39
man you know you're you're always busy
0:41
you're always looking for products I'm
0:43
talking to inventors you probably get
0:44
about a thousand emails a day what's
0:47
going on anything cool happening yeah a
0:49
lot of great stuff I've been traveling a
0:51
lot I've been busy been to a bunch of
0:53
shows the TV show recently an invention
0:56
cottage you know you see we've been
1:00
actually with United inventors
1:01
Association we have a new executive
1:03
director Brian free I don't know if you
1:05
know Brian Brian Sloan island-based and
1:07
well maybe get him on for a future show
1:09
and we've been putting together our
1:12
whole us for the inventors who are
1:14
listening our whole spring schedule of
1:16
inventor pavilions at trade shows and
1:19
since we have Danna on the day it's
1:21
probably appropriate to say we just
1:23
finished talks with the housewares folks
1:26
at D iha to do a uia event a several
1:29
hour uia event special event on Saturday
1:31
the first day of the housewares show
1:33
next March so so never don't know we got
1:37
a lot going on yeah yeah that's awesome
1:39
yeah I do know Brian he's got a great
1:40
reputation in the vendor communities
1:42
that big following too right yeah yeah
1:45
and he brings a lot of energy and
1:48
enthusiasm so it's going to be great
1:50
well cool man I'm glad to hear I know
1:52
you guys always got a lot of stuff going
1:54
on in the house we're sure thing is very
1:55
interesting I want to hear a little bit
1:57
more about that as we for Brett progress
1:59
I'm not working good today I don't know
2:01
what it is got a drink some more water
2:03
but let's bring on our guest man I've
2:05
been waiting for this interview for a
2:06
while and let's bring them on let's talk
2:09
great so it's my pleasure to bring on
2:12
Dan Siegel
2:13
but if I can boast about them a bit dan
2:16
is the president of lifetime brands
2:18
lifetime brands the largest non-electric
2:21
so you know housewares company in the
2:23
country doing business on your almost
2:26
forty different brand names and a
2:28
billion dollars in revenues among other
2:31
brand names they own the brand name
2:32
farmer where but there's many many
2:33
others and I'm sure that the minute I've
2:37
known Dan he's been a good friend and
2:39
we've been working together for I think
2:40
almost 13 years now where I am actually
2:44
involved in the innovation program the
2:45
open innovation program we have there
2:47
and we'll let Dan go into that a bit but
2:49
it's my pleasure to bring on Dan Siegel
2:50
hi Dan hey thanks for having me of
2:53
course of course
2:54
you're now we're in Garden City I'm on
2:57
now in Garden City that's right well
3:00
that's that's the corporate headquarters
3:01
for lifetime grants and I thought we'd
3:04
start the show with some of you may
3:07
recognize the N by the way who was the
3:08
star of a TV show called invention
3:10
hunters for for several years so for
3:13
those of you who he looks familiar to he
3:15
is it he is a TV celebrity and somebody
3:19
used to turn very loosely but Dan I
3:23
thought maybe would start with just you
3:25
know talking about a little bit about
3:27
the history of lifetime brands I know I
3:28
know a lot of people have heard of all
3:30
our brand names but some some folks are
3:33
not not necessarily from over the
3:34
lifetime and company has been around for
3:36
a long time and it's grown dramatically
3:38
over the years and the number one
3:39
housewares company America just maybe
3:41
take us back to where it started and
3:43
where we are today
3:44
yes sure so lifetime started in the mid
3:47
40s and it's a you know we considered a
3:51
true American success story it was
3:53
started by my grandfather and two
3:55
partners and literally it started as you
3:58
know driving around in a station wagon
4:00
and selling knives and that's where the
4:02
company kind of was founded and we look
4:05
at us today and we are a global company
4:07
we are in a hundred and nine different
4:09
countries we are in basically three
4:13
major segments being food preparation
4:15
tabletop and home decor and we sell
4:18
basically every major retailer around
4:21
the globe I think we're in I want to say
4:25
about 11,000 different
4:27
tellers today so quite a big broad
4:30
distribution network we've grown
4:32
tremendously through the years
4:33
combination of organic growth and also
4:36
through acquisitions and we're
4:38
continuing to grow
4:39
we recently merged with another company
4:41
called filament brands we've picked up
4:43
three additional major segments in our
4:46
own business and and we're growing I
4:49
mean it's an exciting time out there
4:50
right now I'm trouble dive into what's
4:52
happening at retail and wholesale and
4:55
you know EECOM and everything else but
4:58
that's a little history of lifetime and
5:00
I've been with the company now for 26
5:02
years when I started with the company we
5:05
were probably around 50 million dollar
5:07
company today were close to you about an
5:10
800 million dollar company publicly
5:12
traded on NASDAQ and so look us up see
5:16
we're about and yeah excited to answer
5:19
any questions you guys may have so the
5:21
symbol under Nasdaq is L cut right L see
5:24
you - yep that's correct
5:26
cool and so before we get into just into
5:29
your specific history Dan what is what
5:33
you know some of the just thinking from
5:37
the from a growth standpoint what are
5:39
what are what are some of the
5:40
significant brand names that we do
5:43
business under you know including Pharma
5:45
we're with some of the others sure so at
5:48
last time we look at its portfolio of
5:49
brands and we we have a combination of
5:52
friends that we own we have brands that
5:55
a license to us and we do private label
5:57
as well so it's basically three segments
6:00
we try to balance out the portfolio to
6:02
make sure that we're weighted the way
6:03
that our strategy dictates we should be
6:05
weighted so most of our business does
6:08
come from our own brands and when it
6:11
comes to our own brands what are the
6:12
ones that are significant that you know
6:14
people really recognize Fargo where
6:16
being one certainly large brand Mikasa
6:19
and tabletop false graph we also have
6:23
the brand built chef in Taylor there's
6:28
Fred and friends those are some of our
6:30
larger brands that we own and then we
6:33
have our major license brand is
6:35
basically KitchenAid at this point which
6:38
is a very large brand for us very
6:40
important brand
6:40
very impactful brand in the marketplace
6:42
and then it comes to private label we do
6:44
a lot of private label you're going to
6:47
William Sonoma we probably do about 80%
6:49
of their tools and gadgets today we do a
6:52
lot for coalesce with food network
6:54
program we do Martha Stewart for Macy's
6:57
amongst many others in the marketplace
6:59
Wow Wow pretty much everyone in America
7:04
is probably come in contact with a
7:06
lifetime brands product yeah I
7:09
definitely walk into anybody's home and
7:11
I can point out that they would have our
7:13
products in their homes I would almost
7:14
guarantee it in some way they do things
7:20
behind the scenes but Dean let's let's
7:25
talk about your background a little bit
7:27
because like you said and you just
7:30
didn't walk into the presidency I know I
7:33
think you started but maybe we could
7:35
just take everybody quickly through and
7:36
if you would tell the story of the
7:40
product
7:41
sure yeah so I started in sales
7:44
basically so I literally you know 26
7:47
years ago would have a cardboard box
7:51
full of knife samples and I'd walked the
7:54
streets in Brooklyn and going to
7:56
independent stores and knock on doors
7:58
and just talk to people I'm sorry and
8:01
hold people up in Brooklyn doesn't not a
8:04
good mix well I'm back in the day the
8:07
parts the parts of Brooklyn that I was
8:08
walking in as a kid from Long Island
8:10
we're probably not the safest parts of
8:12
Brooklyn that are probably much nicer
8:13
today literally I see a store manager
8:16
with box low samples and and try to sell
8:19
you know try to get people to you know
8:22
recognize our products and it was very
8:25
it was very challenging time I'll tell
8:26
you that much
8:27
you know a very shy kid trying to go out
8:29
there and and sell products was not
8:31
really what I envisioned growing up
8:33
that's kind of how I started and I you
8:36
know I just grew from there I started
8:37
taking on some major customers and and
8:39
then started managing other salespeople
8:42
and I just kept growing and really a
8:44
sales were all at about five six years
8:46
ago I will do it to a strategic role
8:48
role of kind of you know mapping out the
8:51
company's strategic plans and
8:52
we see the company over the course of a
8:55
five year change and so I did that for a
8:58
few years and then it's about three
9:00
years ago came two years ago key person
9:02
of the company so it's it's I got to
9:06
really kind of see all sides of the
9:08
business and clearly one of the hardest
9:10
things is the selling side you know
9:12
really kind of getting and selling an
9:15
independent customer in some ways is
9:17
harder than a major retailer because
9:20
when you're talking to an independent
9:21
customer you talking about their own
9:22
money they're literally parting with
9:24
something from their own wallet to you
9:26
to sell a product so they're much more
9:28
passionate about it but then you know
9:30
corporate corporate buyers are very
9:31
sophisticated and they have different
9:33
metrics that they're going to measure
9:34
their themselves by so you start
9:37
learning that but the most important
9:39
thing that I guess I learned from sales
9:40
there are a couple of important things
9:41
is you gotta learn to listen that's more
9:44
important than just speaking you know
9:46
you always have in your head the sales
9:48
person that just blabbers away and
9:50
that's a good sales person to me that's
9:51
the worst sales person sales people that
9:54
learn to listen or the best sales people
9:55
out there you don't have to be the most
9:57
talkative that's one thing the other
10:00
thing that really kind of Steve's with
10:03
me today is about transparency so gotta
10:07
be very transparent and honest you know
10:08
be yourself and that's a cliche about
10:10
being yourself oh yeah you have what
10:12
again a salesperson should be of what
10:14
you think people want you to be but
10:16
that's not who you are
10:17
got to be yourself and that comes across
10:19
people you know appreciate it recognize
10:22
it and you know beginning of my career I
10:24
followed somebody that was very a very
10:28
spoke well very cool helmet could be a
10:31
politician and so I tried to emulate him
10:33
and early in my career and I go to a
10:35
sales cloud I try to be so perfect and
10:36
what I said and everything I did and
10:39
just one day it just you know light bulb
10:41
went on said screw it just be me you
10:43
know I'm talking to people that's all it
10:45
is
10:45
I'm gonna be myself you know it was
10:47
career changing and you know so I
10:50
conduct myself today and and again be
10:52
very transparent particularly when I
10:54
work with Lauren and with the inventors
10:56
that we come in contact with we now past
10:58
that these people are about their ideas
11:01
and their inventions and and you know
11:03
we'll be transparent we'll be honest and
11:05
hope
11:06
we can work out a deal together and if
11:09
we can't that's fine too but it's more
11:12
important to just kind of be in front
11:14
and know where both of us want to
11:17
accomplish from our negotiation or our
11:19
conversation as long as we do that
11:21
everybody's happy in the end and if we
11:23
can't work it out you know with we part
11:24
as friends and that's fine too
11:26
so you know are you asked me about
11:29
that's a good point that you made about
11:31
the independent store owners and getting
11:34
your training there as I used to be one
11:37
years ago and I always say it was you're
11:39
playing with real bullets you know when
11:41
it's your own money you can you can get
11:42
hurt you know yeah absolutely
11:45
did you ever call an ans Abraham yes sir
11:47
no I didn't you know I I never really
11:51
had that that customer I mean I really
11:53
started my major customer that I started
11:57
kind of growing with would be Bed Bath &
12:01
Beyond linens and things you know I was
12:02
in the Northeast so those are some of
12:04
the major customers that I took on
12:05
personally and grew who and they were
12:07
doing very well luckily early in my
12:09
career they were growing through able to
12:10
grow together that's really where I kind
12:12
of got my you know my expertise let's
12:16
say in selling well before we get get
12:19
into talking a little bit more about
12:20
what we're inventors can go and what we
12:22
do there you know I went I always think
12:24
of you and I think of two things that
12:25
are in the company as well I think I
12:26
always think of the company one of the
12:30
things that the catapulted the company
12:31
was the origination of the knife block
12:33
and the importance to that to the
12:37
company's growth and really you know the
12:40
the legacy that that left behind that
12:43
you that you have and so forth for
12:44
innovation and and then of course the
12:47
Samora product which I really really
12:48
want to get in here because I think it's
12:49
the story inventors will enjoy but could
12:52
you could you talk about that that
12:53
launched back whenever the knife block
12:55
was and then a little bit about you some
12:56
more and then we'll get into the
12:57
inventor stuff so yes sure so you know
13:00
lifetime lifetime brands is a company
13:02
about really you know we're a company
13:06
about people but from the other side of
13:09
it is they're a company of innovation
13:10
and we're a company of brands and that's
13:13
something that goes across every single
13:14
person in this organization is that
13:16
that's what we're about
13:18
so when you talk about never
13:20
nation we were the first ones to do a
13:22
slant the knife block and then the first
13:25
ones to do a knife block with steak
13:26
knives in it and that kind of is a you
13:29
know in our world that's a major
13:30
innovation that that's a that's a
13:32
game-changer so we did that and we today
13:35
we have by far the largest share of
13:37
cutlery business in the United States
13:40
it's not even close I mean I'm market
13:42
share is close to 25 percent that's
13:45
incredible
13:46
major brand there is fog aware so you
13:50
know Lauren yes PA but the s'mores maker
13:52
so yeah back some years ago now but I
13:56
was in a Chinese restaurant watching
13:58
them make cocoa platter and so they had
14:01
they familiar with that a flame and
14:03
people are cooking you know that Chinese
14:04
food on that and the thought came about
14:07
doing a s'mores kit instead you know
14:10
roasting a marshmallow like you do
14:11
around campfire so taking the same
14:14
poopoo platter kind of changing it
14:16
making it maybe a little bit more
14:17
appealing and marketing in it that to
14:21
retailers and invention to the consumer
14:24
we launched a s'mores maker which we own
14:26
patent on today to this to this day I
14:28
should say it was the biggest hit in the
14:31
company's history and first year out you
14:34
know over 35 million dollars that retail
14:36
were sold on the s'mores maker and again
14:39
a simple innovation at the end of the
14:41
day it's really just kind of
14:42
retrofitting poopoo platter to make it
14:44
for a mocking a campfire I guess so
14:48
people loved it instead of going outside
14:50
and cooking your marshmallows you do it
14:52
right your house and it became kind of a
14:54
thing families and people to do gather
14:57
around and make s'mores now who doesn't
14:59
like sports a person I'm sick of oh
15:01
because I know my mom said I was out
15:03
demoing them and if I smell a s'more
15:05
today I actually get a little bit of a
15:07
gag reflex but that's neither here nor
15:10
there still a great item and yeah it was
15:12
a exciting thing but again it really
15:14
teaches us and she's the brain this
15:16
company we're about innovation and
15:18
innovation she can be small and
15:20
innovation could be large but
15:21
innovations would excites us and excites
15:24
the customer nice the consumer you know
15:26
we got all these trade shows and we have
15:28
in the company 50,000 active items we
15:32
introduced 5,000 UI
15:34
every year 5000 do you think about that
15:37
so we go to a trade show no retail walks
15:40
in and says to us hey I want to see what
15:42
we've been selling for the last five
15:44
years that's the same question what's
15:47
new it's all anybody ever wants to talk
15:49
about is what's new so we need to have a
15:52
pipeline of new ideas and new products
15:55
consistently and constantly that can
15:58
excite our excuse me excite our retails
16:02
and the other day can sight the consumer
16:04
and that's what we're about we love that
16:05
we get excited about these innovations
16:07
we're not a tech company you know we get
16:10
excited that appeal or just something
16:12
new or a can open it there's something
16:13
new or you know pizza wheel has a new
16:16
feature or function my gosh we like
16:18
little get giddy over it so that's what
16:20
we look for that's what we want we want
16:22
those incremental innovations in the
16:24
kitchen and I think that that's so so
16:27
critical and you know innovation is all
16:31
part of the lifetime prints DNA and and
16:33
that's really where I met Dan you know
16:36
10 or 12 years ago when he started this
16:39
open innovation program at lifetime
16:41
branches it's quite a unique program
16:43
very few companies have something that
16:46
this special immune eeeek most people
16:48
when they're looking for products sort
16:50
of you know put it under you know some
16:53
existing you know area and it's not paid
16:56
a lot of attention to but Dan let's
16:58
let's talk a little bit about about both
17:00
the innovation program that we kind of
17:01
started together and then and then a
17:03
little bit about about lifetime's
17:05
internal development capabilities and
17:07
how that segues in so so I'll let you
17:09
two take the open innovation part first
17:10
yeah sure so you know when we started
17:13
working together
17:13
and one of the things that we looked at
17:15
was we wanted to change the culture that
17:19
if it wasn't invented here wasn't good
17:20
we really wanted to have to get remodel
17:22
more of a PNG type of model that you
17:24
know this great idea is from anybody can
17:27
have a great idea out there and if you
17:29
look at the population United States
17:31
about 320 million people we feel that
17:34
everybody let's say people eat most
17:38
people cook there should be ideas that
17:41
people will have based around just
17:44
playing with products i people are
17:46
passionate about cooking
17:47
we're going to come up there's going to
17:48
be that spark that people have and we
17:51
consistently see that across the board
17:53
particularly in our category we're not
17:55
inventing new drugs here preventing
17:57
things from the kitchen so we have about
17:59
a hundred and fifty full-time people
18:01
that are dedicated to innovation in this
18:04
company between industrial designers and
18:06
graphic designers but how do we now
18:08
catapult that to 320 million people and
18:11
that was a thought process not to war
18:14
I've done together it's just open that
18:16
up open the company up because people
18:18
could have a great idea they have no
18:20
idea how to develop it further and bring
18:23
it to market is very challenging so our
18:25
designers they are very open to that we
18:28
don't take the approach that we did not
18:30
invent it we've changed that culture
18:32
that's that's that's in the past now
18:33
they get excited about taking ideas for
18:36
even from a napkin for that matter and
18:38
then bring it to reality and we work in
18:40
tandem with the inventor community to do
18:41
that we can be very we can take the idea
18:45
and be very collaborative with them or
18:47
we did the idea and we can run with it
18:49
we kind of leave it up to each
18:50
individual inventor how they want to see
18:52
that see that go but again the other day
18:57
it has to be a win win has to be a win
18:59
that we get an innovation that we can
19:00
sell and from the inventor they have to
19:02
have they can see their product to
19:05
market and get a royalty payment to pay
19:07
for that product and really win in it
19:10
and we have multiple multiple hundreds
19:14
now of success stories out in our with
19:18
this program and it's been very exciting
19:19
we love it and Warren's done a great job
19:21
of shepherding these ideas because we
19:25
would get just too many submissions and
19:27
they were gonna get lost in black holes
19:28
so Warren's function with us has been
19:31
terrific we've had a great collaboration
19:32
doing that and it's it's it's really you
19:35
know based in large part on on the
19:38
culture that you've created at the
19:40
company and the belief and that's why I
19:41
try to tie it into the nice block its
19:43
land a nice block and the history the
19:45
company goes back to innovation and I
19:47
think that you know I'm pretty familiar
19:49
with the inventor landscape in the
19:51
company leaves day I don't think there's
19:52
any company in America
19:54
that's as fair as lifetime brands is any
19:57
even one other ones that I work with to
20:00
the
20:00
inventor and to that end maybe did we
20:02
could talk about that a little bit I
20:03
mean every single licensing deal we've
20:06
done and I think we've done over 100 now
20:07
is different in terms of what the
20:10
inventor where they are in the process
20:12
what they want like you were describing
20:14
before you know whether they want us to
20:16
take over the whole project one of it
20:17
whether they want to co-brand it and
20:19
that type of thing we don't steal ideas
20:22
lifetime you know looks at things if we
20:24
say no we don't pursue them in that type
20:26
of thing maybe you could just talk about
20:27
about your philosophy on how we treat
20:29
inventors and the fairness issue there
20:31
yeah so you know we understand that when
20:35
inventor is at a point where they want
20:38
to show something that they are you know
20:40
scared they think someone's going to get
20:43
stolen from them there's a lot of people
20:44
that certainly prey on the infected
20:46
community as we've seen so we really
20:49
taken a very different approach though
20:51
we are a large company or a flexible
20:53
company and at the end of the day want
20:55
people be comfortable they want to
20:57
become to have a comfort level with us
20:58
as a company comfort level so if you are
21:00
and and know that we're not out to harm
21:03
them or to steal anything
21:05
and we really it listen we get one
21:08
person that had a bad experience with
21:09
lifetime that's one person to many and
21:12
for the amount of people that we've
21:13
dealt with over the years I don't think
21:15
you can find one and I guess I would
21:17
look at it like just like we everybody
21:19
looks at rays and reviews today you know
21:21
whether it be on Amazon or
21:23
Wayfarer or Walmart comm or Batman
21:25
whatever that that really drives
21:27
behavior those ratings and reviews well
21:30
same thing here so we want to make sure
21:32
that our ratings and reviews are
21:34
positive five stars with the inventive
21:37
community the same way so we're going to
21:39
treat people fairly and and you know
21:41
Maura knows me if president company if
21:43
there's ever situation that inventor was
21:45
not feet treated fairly by any one of
21:47
our associates that would not be a good
21:50
thing because I'm certainly behind this
21:51
I want to keep getting these ideas I
21:54
believe in the program strongly and I
21:57
believe that it has to be as said
21:58
earlier a win-win for everybody if it's
22:00
not then then we're doing something
22:02
wrong that's so true their support you
22:05
know all it from the top to bottom which
22:06
is a piece on and you know this is an
22:08
ongoing thing you know we do get
22:10
thousands of submissions every year so
22:12
some
22:14
folks aren't quite ready but we get back
22:16
to every single person even if it's with
22:18
an O or you're not ready or it's not for
22:20
us and you know even even next week next
22:23
Tuesday I'm coming down with a local
22:25
inventor who has a very cool reusable
22:27
straw that we set up meetings and that
22:30
and the president division will be there
22:31
you know so that philosophy goes right
22:33
down and they'll get a whole tour of the
22:35
showroom and I would just say to any of
22:37
our listeners if anybody has a cool
22:39
product than they submitted to us they
22:40
can either go through the lifetime
22:41
brands website which is lifetime grants
22:44
calm and follow the instructions on the
22:46
home page do you have a new idea where
22:48
they can go through monastry marketing
22:50
but easier ways to probably go through
22:52
the lifetime site there's its
22:53
questionnaire there and we'll always get
22:55
back to everybody but if you're in the
22:56
New York area and you have something
22:57
call we'd love to see you as well
22:59
so Dan let me just say way that also
23:01
into you know a very very very strong
23:04
product development internal program at
23:08
lifetime like you said 5,000 new
23:10
products a year one of the things that I
23:12
always appreciated from the beginning
23:14
there's never been any friction between
23:16
me and what I do and you know I was a
23:19
little nervous when I first came in the
23:20
building 12 years ago you know how would
23:22
I be received
23:23
I'm very well received because what
23:25
happens in essence is when we license
23:27
these outside products they then become
23:29
part of the internal portfolio maybe you
23:31
just talk about that for a minute yeah
23:33
so I mean yeah they don't they took bad
23:36
behind your back or not to your face I
23:38
want it be clear online no I'm kidding
23:41
so yeah no they you know we do have
23:44
again a large industrial design
23:48
department larger engineering department
23:50
state-of-the-art equipment and truly
23:54
like we are we get excited about these
23:57
inventions so we want them to be part of
23:59
this we want we want them to see kind of
24:02:00
a particular if they if they ever get to
24:03:00
New York we would give a tour of the
24:04:00
showroom tours of the design area but it
24:09:00
does go through a rather robust process
24:11:00
because it's to take an item from
24:14:00
literally a sketch on a napkin or you
24:17:00
know some kind of very you know
24:21:00
rudimentary as we would consider it
24:23:00
design to something that will function
24:26:00
properly
24:27:00
we're experts in our categories so you
24:30:00
know we you know it's kind of funny I
24:34:00
guess I throw this out there so you
24:35:00
watch a video on Kickstarter and a video
24:38:00
is that some design or showing a knife
24:40:00
and he's talking in a maybe an English
24:42:00
accent about how he ripped apart every
24:46:00
knife and did all these shows all these
24:48:00
great sketches and now this is gonna be
24:50:00
the best knife ever but I have a guy
24:52:00
sitting back there his name's Adam Craig
24:54:00
he's been designing knives for 25 years
24:57:00
he's forgotten more on his way to work
25:00:00
then that guy knows completely so we
25:04:00
have people in this he doesn't peak with
25:05:00
a British accent that's the problem he
25:07:00
speaks with a Brooklyn accent but we
25:08:00
should put him on Kickstarter yeah
25:10:00
listen I joked about it I mean nobody
25:12:00
knows more about knife designed in this
25:14:00
guy and you know what with 25 percent
25:17:00
market share in the category he knows
25:19:00
what he's doing you know some guy that
25:21:00
just you know skip some things doesn't
25:23:00
have the the expertise he you know again
25:25:00
this guy's bringing in so you know but
25:29:00
in every one of our businesses within
25:31:00
the kitchen we have these experts so
25:33:00
somebody can sit there and have a great
25:35:00
again we believe in these great ideas
25:37:00
but how it functions in said category
25:41:00
you requires tremendous expertise
25:44:00
particularly something as an
25:45:00
articulating aspect to it but even just
25:49:00
basic things we understand how things
25:51:00
work so again we know there's great
25:53:00
ideas and inventions that come from the
25:55:00
outside but bringing them to market so
25:56:00
they function properly and more
25:59:00
importantly are safe that's another
26:01:00
thing you know be sure well so we
26:03:00
understand all the product safeties
26:05:00
issues all the things that can trip
26:08:00
somebody up if they do it on their own
26:10:00
or when with a lesser company we obsess
26:13:00
about these things I mean we have about
26:16:00
close to about 250 people just in China
26:20:00
alone what we do most of our
26:21:00
manufacturing going around to these
26:24:00
factories with iPads that have quality
26:28:00
manufacturing technicalities on them
26:31:00
that they sit there the inspectors and
26:34:00
it's this is all baked into our system
26:36:00
based on experience and things that we
26:39:00
know could go wrong in any one cat
26:41:00
this is what we obsess over this is what
26:43:00
we do I mean again with the amount of
26:46:00
products we have in the amount of market
26:47:00
share that we we've achieved we know
26:50:00
better than anybody how to bring a power
26:52:00
to market that is safe it functions
26:55:00
properly and will be at the right retail
26:57:00
for the consumer so they'll actually buy
26:58:00
it you know the amount of equipment in
27:02:00
in in the lifetime headquarters
27:04:00
dedicated product development it's
27:06:00
amazing it's millions of dollars
27:07:00
equipment it's not just 3d printers you
27:09:00
know sophisticated things it's all types
27:11:00
of stuff back there you know we've had
27:13:00
three national open houses for inventors
27:16:00
karma and if you're ever up in the New
27:18:00
York area you got to come come and see
27:20:00
it we'll set up another one after the
27:22:00
housewares show maybe next exercise for
27:24:00
your summer but it's a great opportunity
27:26:00
and we've had 80 to 100 inventors come
27:29:00
in for each one of them where people can
27:30:00
really take the tour of the building so
27:31:00
if anybody is really serious you know
27:34:00
who's listening who's got a serious
27:35:00
product as well along the way reach out
27:38:00
to us reach out to me as well ww telecom
27:42:00
or lifetime grants calm and and make
27:45:00
sure that you know if you're in the New
27:48:00
York area if you've got something
27:49:00
serious we could certainly show you all
27:50:00
the stuff so so you said you know all of
27:53:00
the people dedicated you know internally
27:56:00
all the people in China and so forth
27:58:00
could you just touch on something real
28:00:00
quick down that you spoke about earlier
28:02:00
and that's now and I know that you've
28:04:00
had a lot to do with this and your
28:05:00
travel schedules ridiculous
28:06:00
the overseas development there's now
28:08:00
sort of a lifetime brands in Europe I
28:10:00
know in Brazil you know part ownership
28:13:00
over coming in Mexico and so forth and I
28:15:00
think that when people have ideas and
28:17:00
they bring to us they don't realize that
28:18:00
lifetime has this full worldwide reach
28:21:00
maybe you could talk about about Europe
28:22:00
and a little bit yeah sure so so we got
28:26:00
to come a few companies around around
28:28:00
the world so we have a two companies in
28:32:00
the UK which gives us distribution in
28:36:00
the UK in continental Europe with
28:38:00
actually the largest house for a company
28:40:00
in the UK believe it or not with a brand
28:42:00
with a company called kitchen craft and
28:44:00
also the brand that they use so yes we
28:46:00
have reach into as I mentioned earlier
28:49:00
109 countries so we certainly can cover
28:52:00
North America South America
28:54:00
Europe we do some in Asia remember that
28:57:00
cooking the way they cook it very
29:00:00
different than the way we cook and the
29:02:00
way they dine is different than where we
29:03:00
dine but Europe is very similar so
29:05:00
really a lot more cross over there and
29:07:00
also in South America
29:09:00
so yeah when somebody has an idea we
29:11:00
take it to our partners and other parts
29:13:00
of our company globally it's not just in
29:16:00
the United States and this cliff a it's
29:19:00
been funny there's been some items that
29:21:00
we've passed on in the US because the
29:24:00
markets too small but in in Europe the
29:26:00
market may be much larger I'll give you
29:28:00
an example was that you know a Mezzaluna
29:29:00
that we worked on wine a mess Aluna in
29:33:00
the United States is what we would
29:34:00
consider a D item it doesn't generate a
29:37:00
lot of sales that the market size is
29:39:00
rather small which are things that we
29:41:00
take into serious consideration for
29:42:00
taking on a project but in the UK a
29:45:00
Mezzaluna is an a item you know it's a
29:48:00
big selling item they use it very
29:50:00
differently and our so our partners in
29:54:00
Europe went after it so there could be
29:56:00
and sometimes the items will completely
29:58:00
global you mean you don't really find as
29:59:00
many of those as you would think but if
30:02:00
something doesn't work in this doesn't
30:04:00
mean it wouldn't work in another part of
30:05:00
our company
30:07:00
I'll give you an ironic example like
30:09:00
even a Canada so a potato masher in the
30:14:00
United States on a kitchen gadget wall
30:16:00
it's considered an a/d if not lower SKU
30:21:00
it's just not a big selling item
30:22:00
Americans do not really use potato
30:24:00
masher all that much it's a decent item
30:26:00
but it doesn't serve cell like a Turner
30:29:00
or spoon or something like that you go
30:32:00
into Canada the Canadians love mashed
30:34:00
potatoes obviously so that becomes like
30:37:00
an a item in Canada so it's even like
30:39:00
you know just across our North border
30:40:00
there are differences in the way people
30:42:00
cook all those golf fans that yell out
30:46:00
mashed potatoes Warren I don't play golf
30:49:00
like here I can work I got a company to
30:52:00
run here the latest goofy craze but no
30:55:00
but I'm getting yeah Matthew and his
30:57:00
team over and Engler doing a great job
30:59:00
and I'm getting more more leads dan from
31:02:00
England Scotland just got one from
31:04:00
Scotland the other day
31:05:00
so now how you expensed the trip was was
31:08:00
a lead generation for business and of
31:11:00
course is in Scotland I you really took
31:14:00
it to a new low there was a prison but I
31:23:00
will tell you you married a same picture
31:26:00
but I will tell you a really funny funny
31:28:00
story
31:29:00
a woman reached out from Scotland and
31:31:00
right before we were leaving and and she
31:34:00
had been sent to me from from Matthew
31:36:00
and in England and and so I communicated
31:38:00
back and forth and filled out ndas
31:39:00
non-disclosure agreements and all that
31:41:00
got everything prior and I said she said
31:43:00
well I'm from Scotland I said that's so
31:44:00
funny I'm gonna be there this weekend so
31:47:00
she said I I want to meet you she said
31:49:00
she said I'll Drive well I said I said
31:51:00
well how do you even know if I'll be in
31:53:00
the area of Scotland you're in she does
31:54:00
I'll drive to wherever you are and I
31:56:00
said I said really it's my wife's
31:57:00
birthday she was drink I said you can't
32:01:00
do it anyway that's sort of funny but
32:03:00
these are the types of conversations we
32:04:00
have but hey carmine maybe maybe you'd
32:06:00
like to jump in at the end here with a
32:08:00
couple questions you've been listening
32:09:00
oh man we all know the inventors are
32:12:00
great they're so passionate about what
32:14:00
they do as as dan had talked about dan
32:16:00
first of all I love everything you guys
32:19:00
are doing everything that you talked
32:20:00
about it is just so amazing to have a
32:23:00
company like yours how how much you've
32:26:00
grown you've never really lost sight of
32:28:00
the inventors and the guys that feed
32:30:00
those products to you and I really
32:32:00
commend everything that you're doing and
32:35:00
I'm not just saying that I mean it's
32:36:00
just awesome how you are interacting
32:38:00
with inventors yeah thank you you know
32:41:00
again as I mentioned we we take it
32:43:00
seriously we believe in it and you know
32:45:00
we don't just talk to talk we walk the
32:47:00
walk so absolutely appreciate that yeah
32:50:00
one thing that I do want our listeners
32:52:00
to know about it and you've done so
32:54:00
great it's you know I could see why
32:56:00
you're on TV man you just love this
32:58:00
stuff I mean it's not like you're just
32:59:00
sitting there talking about
33:00:00
automatically I mean you are seriously
33:02:00
love what you're doing and it it comes
33:04:00
out while you're talking about it
33:07:00
yeah thanks have a good actor I guess it
33:15:00
is good
33:19:00
it's so nice I could see the passion
33:21:00
your eye when you're traveling or you
33:23:00
walking to and your friends houses when
33:25:00
you get to see a product that you took
33:26:00
from like you said a napkin or a
33:28:00
rudimentary of prototype and you develop
33:31:00
that and you help them work with the
33:32:00
inventor and you see that product in
33:34:00
action and in someone's house or out on
33:36:00
the street or someone walking through it
33:38:00
is just so fun and so nice to be able to
33:40:00
know that you were a part of that
33:42:00
they're there literally is nothing
33:45:00
better so I mean I remember very early
33:48:00
on I had an idea for a package on a
33:50:00
product when I was in sales live my
33:52:00
first year and so we changed some copy
33:54:00
on a package and and added some things I
33:57:00
wanted and it ended up on a retail shelf
34:00:00
and I just married just was just we just
34:01:00
copy on a package I'm like man I did
34:03:00
that and it kind of stuck with me you
34:06:00
know to this day and there's no better
34:09:00
feeling I mean it's even crazier honest
34:11:00
I think we've talked about the s'mores
34:12:00
earlier it's worth saying and you know
34:15:00
we're a company that you know so on the
34:18:00
package we wanted to show it in use so
34:21:00
we grabbed five people from the company
34:23:00
to like make like a little kitchen scene
34:25:00
right
34:26:00
they weren't actors actually one of them
34:27:00
turned out to be my wife and we kind of
34:29:00
get married after that but anyway so we
34:32:00
had these five people from the cotton
34:33:00
company like two people in accounting
34:35:00
you know one you know here really just
34:37:00
aren't no associates and you know put
34:39:00
him on box and so the sports maker took
34:41:00
off and we started getting people
34:44:00
sending in they were recreating the
34:47:00
scene in their own homes so to show you
34:51:00
how crazy we are then we would take
34:53:00
those scenes and we mock-up a real
34:55:00
package and send it back to the people
34:57:00
we love what we're doing I mean this is
35:00:00
so cool like you know we have you over
35:02:00
Pennsylvania you know like with around
35:04:00
their family and people in like Virginia
35:06:00
and we was literally making mock-up oxes
35:08:00
and sending him back out to them came
35:10:00
this little cottage thing that was
35:11:00
really fun and cool so yeah so when you
35:15:00
develop something use something that
35:17:00
you've done and you see it on a retail
35:20:00
shuffle you see it in in somebody's home
35:22:00
I gotta tell you man it is it is gray it
35:26:00
is so fun you feel like really had an
35:28:00
impact
35:28:00
and I love it I think anybody that's
35:31:00
experienced dated too high that's what I
35:33:00
would say and you know if anybody if
35:35:00
anybody wants another opportunity to
35:37:00
meet Dan someday or or the lifetime team
35:40:00
come to the housewares show in Chicago
35:42:00
it's an early March every year it's a
35:44:00
three days show if you're developing and
35:46:00
working on a housewares product it's a
35:48:00
it's a great opportunity to see what's
35:50:00
going on in the industry you know come
35:52:00
by will give you a tour that boosts the
35:53:00
lifetime brands booth by square footage
35:55:00
is the biggest who's at the show and Dan
35:58:00
is always there on the floor 24/7
36:00:00
through the show you know making sure he
36:02:00
meets everybody I bring a lot of
36:03:00
inventors over just to say hi very very
36:05:00
accessible
36:06:00
you know nobody hides behind it's not
36:08:00
transparent and if you come at lunch
36:10:00
we'll give you a sandwich too so think
36:13:00
about coming to the show I brought many
36:14:00
people back to those sandwiches there
36:16:00
the other thing is to is to tour the the
36:19:00
invention area the inventor area that
36:21:00
the United manners Association which I'm
36:23:00
the president of has been very integral
36:26:00
in developing and we're gonna have a big
36:28:00
program there this year so so you know I
36:31:00
really appreciate your time I know a
36:33:00
half-an-hour goes quickly here but I
36:35:00
think it's been really informative and I
36:37:00
hope that our listeners will feel very
36:39:00
comfortable like you said in the
36:40:00
beginning a lot of folks are just very
36:42:00
nervous you know about going to a big
36:44:00
company and and like here you're really
36:46:00
explaining we're not really we're a big
36:48:00
coming but we're not really a big
36:49:00
company we're a bunch of individuals to
36:51:00
try to make everybody feel at home so
36:54:00
yeah and I would I would kind of second
36:56:00
that that a lot of inventors yes they
36:58:00
are nervous but as Dan said they're
37:01:00
approachable Google his brand Google his
37:03:00
website google his name and you'll see
37:05:00
that they're not out there stealing
37:07:00
ideas they're trying to help the
37:08:00
inventors and that's what's so great
37:10:00
about this is that people could come to
37:13:00
you Dan with all different phases they
37:14:00
could have been developing just a napkin
37:15:00
or they could have a prototype but your
37:17:00
your guys will help them which is
37:19:00
something that not too many companies
37:21:00
are doing so I think it's just awesome
37:22:00
good I appreciate they found me on guys
37:25:00
you know what and one last thing by the
37:27:00
way just so everybody knows this just
37:32:00
the inventor gets to keep their entire
37:34:00
royalty that we're this is there's no
37:36:00
middleman here I work you know in
37:39:00
conjunction with lifetime they reward me
37:41:00
and take care of me which is another
37:42:00
amazing thing about the companies I
37:44:00
don't have to be put in a situation
37:46:00
where I'm you know working you know
37:49:00
getting paid by inventors and all the
37:51:00
mess that goes along with that there's
37:53:00
so many folks in America that work on
37:54:00
that model that you know sort of cross
37:56:00
over the line and then there's a lot of
37:58:00
people that take advantage of inventors
37:59:00
you will you will get your full you know
38:02:00
funds here directly to you and all we
38:04:00
are here to do is to advocate and help
38:06:00
you so that's another very very unique
38:07:00
thing about our program so thanks Dan
38:11:00
really appreciate it I hope I'll see you
38:13:00
next week if you're around yep sounds
38:15:00
good thanks for having me once again and
38:17:00
have a good weekend guys all right thank
38:19:00
you thank you yeah for all you listeners
38:21:00
out there please go on out to lifetime
38:23:00
brands com check it out look at the
38:25:00
website it's awesome
38:27:00
if you have an idea you have a product
38:29:00
that you might want to present go ahead
38:30:00
and do that through the website or get
38:32:00
in touch with mr. Warren Tuttle you
38:33:00
everybody knows him everybody sees them
38:35:00
he's always out there looking for
38:36:00
products I thank you all for listening
38:37:00
and we'll catch you next time on the
38:39:00
inventors launchpad network you all take
38:41:00
care right awesome thanks thank you
38:47:00
thank you