Pillar Product Design CEO Bob Carrasca Discusses How to Move Forward With Your Great Idea

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Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
hi everyone and welcome to the
0:03
inventor's launchpad Network
0:05
I am carmine danesco your host for one
0:08
of my favorite shows the IP Bo bold IP
0:12
show with my buddy
0:14
JD Huebner hey JD you over there what's
0:16
happening hey carmine good morning no my
0:19
friend is getting the week started
0:20
excited to be on the show today yeah
0:22
very easy yeah I know you're traveling
0:25
around man you're gonna do what you're
0:26
doing a lot of stuff out there I see you
0:27
all over the place yeah we have the
0:30
first quarter was it was pretty well we
0:32
were just we're trying to get local more
0:34
than ever I talked to this a lot of work
0:36
trying to get into the community into
0:38
the industries that are here so that's
0:40
been a lot of fun we've got a two big
0:43
meetings that are kind of on the boring
0:45
side for a lot of inventors that they
0:46
lose they're lost you know legal meaning
0:48
big worldwide intellectual property I
0:52
inta int a and frigging the acronym it's
0:56
actually here in Seattle this year so as
0:59
middle of the month May and then the
1:01
American electoral property Law
1:02
Association is also here doing a big
1:04
continuing legal education meeting so
1:06
kind of a legally learning month we got
1:08
a couple attorneys going down there
1:09
networking with other attorneys just
1:12
trying to just sharpen our skills I mean
1:14
that we can't forget you know
1:15
continually learn to go to deliver the
1:18
highest quality value to our client no
1:20
it's awesome and I see you guy you're
1:22
still doing your your YouTube your a
1:24
Daily Show yeah no we are bold today's
1:28
show we're having fun that we just broke
1:30
a hundred subscribers so we're just
1:31
getting started but it's funny though it
1:33
quickly I write we've got yeah still
1:37
three to five minutes high-impact fun
1:40
patent legal tidbit with a with a bold
1:43
challenge so the idea is to get anybody
1:46
that kind of needs that nudge every
1:48
morning there's something creative we're
1:50
still working hard to try to get more
1:52
people commenting but that's always one
1:54
of those Tuffy's and I'm thinking later
1:57
in the next month we may be doing some
1:58
offers so try to incentivize some more
2:00
listeners just get people more
2:02
interested the answer the question right
2:04
you know you got some sort of a perk but
2:07
anyway we're again let it get feedback
2:09
on the content which is fun yeah it's
2:10
cool man I mean I had up my cellular
2:12
data because
2:13
every morning I'm listening and watching
2:15
the YouTube things myself but it's worth
2:19
it man it's worth it i watch every
2:20
morning so I think it's gonna build up
2:23
it takes time I mean and as far as the
2:25
comments it's very tough especially if
2:27
people are watching while they're
2:28
driving or do that Nathan with podcasts
2:32
you know it's very tough to get people
2:35
to send in questions or messages it's
2:37
just people are usually watching it on
2:39
the go so it's cool that you got a
2:41
hundred subscribers I think that's that
2:42
just shows that you know it's gonna take
2:44
some time but it will build up man you
2:46
got good content I watch it every
2:48
morning good deal yeah thank you
2:50
everyone the money week so it's always
2:52
hopefully a popular one I'll learn all
2:53
the how to make money with that it's
2:56
always good I like them all but yeah
2:58
everybody's always asking about that I'm
2:59
sure that's the first thing you want to
3:00
know I got this patent put on a wall and
3:03
then they said now what do I do it yeah
3:06
well I don't got a guest today you have
3:09
a gentleman Bob Carrasco I think I
3:12
pronounced les that's correct yep from
3:15
pillar product designs man we were
3:16
talking before the show started and he's
3:18
got some great stuff going on over there
3:20
I don't know if you wanna do a quick
3:21
intro or you want him to just jump in go
3:23
but go right ahead yeah so we've been
3:26
around since 2008 and we've been helping
3:29
a lot of everything from single inventor
3:32
entrepreneurs all the way to corporate
3:34
clients to sort of bring their dreams
3:37
alive and we we work in on everything
3:40
our core DNA we started in the action
3:45
sports industry I've got about 15 plus
3:48
years working in that industry so really
3:50
involved with building highly durable
3:52
goods that need to a stand a variety of
3:55
harsh environments and over the last
3:58
five to six years that has evolved into
4:01
wearable tech with electronics
4:03
integration prosthetics safety here and
4:07
so those are some of the markets we have
4:08
a small team here we're based out of
4:11
Seattle Washington you can see some of
4:14
our portfolio on our website at
4:23
www.kerryshook.org or
4:26
of individuals that come in on contract
4:28
to work for us and we also have a very
4:30
large network of prototype and
4:32
production facilities both domestic and
4:35
overseas so that's kind of a I guess the
4:39
elevator pitch I know you are closely
4:43
with with JD and bold IP be calm by the
4:49
way if any of you listeners are out
4:50
there now is this for your doing
4:53
contract work for your clients Bob oh
4:56
and then push it and then send him over
4:58
to JD or you're kind of working on your
4:59
own things maybe maybe JD or you you can
5:02
give us a little bit of a rundown how
5:03
you guys are working together yeah so
5:05
it's a it's a great relationship to
5:08
start off you know we we get a lot of
5:10
clients in that need help with
5:11
intellectual property and defining that
5:14
and doing the proper searches before
5:15
they start dumping money into you know
5:18
the development of a product and so on
5:21
I believe on JD site and you can
5:23
probably speak for this piece of it but
5:24
he gets a lot of clients at once they
5:26
kind of go through the IEP stage and
5:28
through the patent kind of initial
5:30
patent process that they they they want
5:33
to take it to that next level yeah so
5:37
yeah and I know JD's gonna jump in what
5:39
I like about what you said is that a lot
5:42
of people also want to bypass that and
5:45
they really can't they shouldn't right
5:47
talk to JD and you at the same time
5:50
because a lot of people and you might
5:51
the experience is Bob is that I'll let
5:54
JD jump in is that they do this full
5:56
development they get that thing done and
5:58
they haven't consulted or done though
6:00
right all important searches right JD
6:02
great you got it yeah and this is myself
6:04
I think you talk for an hour on this and
6:09
the idea of doing those upfront if you
6:11
think that your invention is
6:13
one-of-a-kind if you think you're the
6:15
first to do it you know to have
6:17
functionality that's different
6:18
you've got to invest the time so please
6:22
do work yourself go look on Google
6:24
patent up on USPTO gob dig in a detail
6:29
how to go look on those in our book
6:31
we're giving it away for free that bold
6:33
IP comm going to navigate to the
6:35
publication section it's basic you know
6:39
your pensions
6:40
turns crunch in no put your main novel
6:44
functions and you can get a good
6:46
feedback and once you've done your own
6:47
diligence and confirmed that and you
6:49
need something novel hire professionals
6:52
do it to take a look worldwide
6:54
look at publications not only from
6:56
patent offices around the world but from
6:58
your academic journals publications from
7:01
university looking at different things
7:04
on anything on Google and he has ever
7:06
been published before can act as prior
7:08
art to prevent you from getting a patent
7:10
that's really the key now I mean you
7:12
don't want to spend you know don't go
7:14
broke on hiring professionals to do this
7:16
work for you so it is a balance and so
7:18
that's kind of I wanted to get that
7:19
today to hear from Bob and he hears
7:21
works with businesses of all sizes and
7:25
so I wanted to focus particularly on the
7:27
small size inventor maybe from the solo
7:29
inventor and Bob can kind of walk us
7:31
through someone that is interested in
7:34
getting your help with they've kind of
7:35
made they got a prototype or they've got
7:38
a really good written description but
7:39
what their invention is and they want to
7:40
bring it to life what are things that
7:42
you help them consider right out of the
7:44
gate sure yeah so you know one of the
7:47
things that's super important is that we
7:49
keep feeding information to their patent
7:52
attorney as we're going through the
7:53
development process because there's a
7:55
lot of you know the genesis of the idea
7:58
can can adapt and modify over time as
8:01
you're going through the development
8:02
process so keeping making sure that the
8:05
IP is up-to-date is super important as
8:08
you you know continue closer and closer
8:10
to getting your patent place we do work
8:13
with a lot of single inventor
8:14
entrepreneur types and in that process
8:16
people come in with everything from a
8:20
napkin sketch
8:21
- hey picture this or you know look at
8:25
this great drawing that I've you know
8:26
supplied you how do we take this to the
8:28
next level and but then we have one
8:31
people that bring in working prototypes
8:33
we have people that have actually
8:35
product lines that are already in place
8:37
that they want to either make better or
8:40
they're purchasing it from a another
8:42
source supplier that they want to
8:43
improve upon and they see advantages in
8:46
doing that so through that development
8:48
process
8:51
again it's it's one of those things
8:53
where it's great to have more eyes on it
8:56
than less and and it really will
8:59
I mean company even large corporations
9:01
come to us because they get to get
9:03
filters and blinders on of what they can
9:05
do and and we're you know pillar at
9:08
pillar design we do so many different
9:10
types of products in so many different
9:11
industries you know really are our core
9:15
objective is to problem-solve
9:17
and really break that problem into
9:19
smaller pieces that we can then sort of
9:21
analyze and and come up with Bible
9:23
solutions for so going through that sort
9:27
of product mapping process and really
9:29
taking a lot of ideas and really getting
9:31
down to a minimalistic design is super
9:34
important awesome
9:36
yeah I think there's important for the
9:38
listeners we just hit a bunch of points
9:39
we could talk on those so just to coming
9:41
back what you mentioned the first thing
9:43
is kind of as Genesis and as the idea
9:44
evolves as they bring it to you when
9:47
concern I hear a lot from inventor
9:49
clients that I have is you know this is
9:51
my invention oh my gosh I don't want to
9:52
share it with anybody else I know what
9:55
happens if someone else gives me some
9:56
insight or changes to this and it it's
9:59
wonderful you know when your group is
10:01
done and helping to clarify that yes you
10:05
know your team actually helps Co invent
10:08
some improve and should be named as an
10:10
inventor and that's not scary it
10:12
shouldn't be scared because you assign
10:15
the right back to the person that hires
10:18
so it's not like they lose anything
10:19
around third they just gain right
10:22
they're hiring you all the documents are
10:24
in a row and what's important about this
10:26
Genesis is why you want to communicate
10:27
with the attorney is you can actually
10:30
have what's called continuation filings
10:32
those improvements could actually be so
10:34
substantial they could actually be
10:36
independent inventions that can become
10:39
part of a portfolio once you say you
10:41
file the initial app and you come to Bob
10:44
and color product design you know they
10:46
realized oh my gosh this thing could
10:47
actually have a totally different
10:48
application you're underwater or you
10:50
know you know in an airplane and you
10:52
didn't claim that and with these other
10:55
aspects you could actually show and have
10:56
a different pen set ever-reliable yeah
10:59
we've had some interesting situations
11:01
where the client will come in and there
11:04
this is our target demographic this is
11:06
who we want to get this product to and
11:08
as we go through this product
11:09
development process and and really start
11:11
breaking the product down we've actually
11:13
had that we've actually been able to
11:15
guide clients to even an even more
11:17
profitable market that they didn't even
11:19
realize existed or or multiple markets
11:22
that they didn't even consider through
11:24
the product when they from their initial
11:25
idea so yeah it's really an interesting
11:28
let Co develop you know process and me
11:30
you know our team is very much engaged
11:33
with our clients we always have a
11:35
open-door policy we meet with our
11:38
clients all the time and you know we
11:41
believe communication transparency is
11:43
super important through the process so
11:50
yeah people wouldn't mind giving an
11:51
example would you know someone that has
11:52
brought in let's say just drawing I mean
11:55
trying to get that first version what
11:57
kind of time frame are people looking at
11:58
you know to get something in their hands
12:00
they could take to a trade show so most
12:03
the time so we break the project's up
12:05
loosely into three phases to get you to
12:07
a working prototype so phase one is what
12:10
we consider the research information
12:12
gathering ID development and and what
12:15
its involved with that is really want to
12:17
understand Co know what's the must-haves
12:19
likes and wants of this product and
12:21
those change a lot of times clients will
12:24
think that these are must-have ideas and
12:26
then when they really start looking on
12:27
it's like well we can consolidate you
12:29
know these three ideas into kind of one
12:30
component we give up a little here but
12:32
we gain a lot more here you know I can
12:35
hit my price point for this product so
12:37
kind of the initial to kind of get the
12:40
ball rolling really what we're looking
12:41
for is what do you want to pay for this
12:43
item what can you sell it for so what
12:46
are your margins of this product and
12:47
then kind of the third pieces that you
12:50
know have you started the intellectual
12:51
property search piece of it
12:53
what sort of patent coverage is on this
12:55
thing is you know is there is it a is it
12:57
a patent minefield do we do we have to
12:59
work around someone else's IP or is this
13:02
thing so new and revolutionary that
13:04
there's been no claim to it and so as we
13:08
kind of go through this we figure out
13:10
the form fit and functional requirements
13:12
and we submit multiple designs multiple
13:15
ideas some of them are more
13:17
sort of the low-risk and then some of
13:21
them are more high-risk designs and we
13:23
we walked the plant through sort of the
13:25
advantages and disadvantages of each of
13:26
these kind of concepts and things that
13:28
we're presenting to them and it's very
13:30
much sitting down at the table going
13:32
through sketch concepts going through
13:34
hey there's this similar product out on
13:36
the market do you think it could be
13:38
something like this or you know here's
13:40
this whole revolutionary new idea and
13:42
we've reinvented the wheel so it's that
13:44
whole spectrum and you know and really
13:47
trying to again for us it's super
13:50
important done to drive towards the cost
13:51
of goods that that that person needs to
13:54
hit or that company needs to hit to be
13:57
able to make it viable once we get
14:00
through phase 1 phase 1 it's really
14:01
taking a bunch of ideas and paring it
14:03
down into a single sort of design
14:05
direction and once we're at the end of
14:09
that we go into phase 2 which is more
14:12
developing kind of a collateral for
14:14
production and prototype development so
14:17
what that means is we start building CAD
14:19
models we start doing engineering
14:21
drawings you start doing design for
14:23
manufacturability and assembly we look
14:25
at finalizing the materials we look at
14:28
finalizing the construction so all the
14:31
collateral we need basically to be able
14:32
to kind of bring this thing into the
14:34
real world and then phase 3
14:36
our focus is mainly on prototype
14:39
development and it's not like you build
14:42
one prototype and you're off to the
14:43
races
14:44
it's normally it's a series apart
14:46
normally we get you know depending on
14:48
the complexity of the product we get you
14:50
about 70% of the way there on the first
14:51
one and then you know might take two or
14:54
three more to do that final 30 percent
14:56
and then once you have that sort of
14:58
working prototype then we go back to the
15:00
factories and make sure that we're on
15:03
our target cost goals cool one one thing
15:07
that just comes right to mind is why I
15:09
advise clients you know what to do the
15:11
search we confirm the novelty and patent
15:13
ability will help them follow is called
15:15
a provisional patent application and
15:17
what that does is does locks in the
15:19
filing date super important you know at
15:22
the passing of the American Invents Act
15:23
in 2013 that is what's important not
15:26
necessarily first-to-invent anymore to
15:28
actually get to the filing writers and
15:31
so after that date what I told it was
15:32
this exciting time you have an entire
15:34
year well that can go fast they look now
15:38
is the time to go test the market now is
15:40
the time to go build your products share
15:42
with the world talk to investors that
15:45
kind of I'm putting myself on the spot
15:46
about here and I tell them that there's
15:47
plenty of time is there you know can you
15:50
actually get something built you know
15:51
maybe a couple months and build and
15:53
bring something
15:54
it's just yeah just depends some sort of
15:56
the complexity of the product I mean we
15:59
have products to go everything from you
16:01
know two or three hundred unique pieces
16:03
that go into an assembly of highly
16:05
complicated you know you're looking at
16:08
you know six months to a year easily to
16:11
bring something like that to market you
16:14
have other products obviously
16:15
electronics adds a little bit of lead
16:17
time as well in the development
16:19
debugging the firmware the software
16:20
that's involved with it there's an app
16:22
that works with that device as well that
16:24
you know we got to put that on into the
16:26
lead time of the product development
16:27
process to get through sort of phase 1
16:31
to phase 3 depending on it's just sort
16:34
of a simple kind of middle-of-the-road
16:36
type of product you're probably looking
16:38
at somewhere around six months all right
16:41
well yeah because one of the cool things
16:43
about this you know peripheral then
16:44
non-original
16:45
is that you can roll up those
16:48
improvements and changes that you have
16:49
in that year to their non provisional
16:51
filing and when I tell people you can
16:54
get customer feedback right variable
16:56
which is twenty yeah a little bit more
16:58
about how you implement customer
17:00
feedback into the consumers product well
17:03
so so part of this so once you hit let's
17:05
say you have you build a pilot
17:07
production run of product right can
17:10
happen a couple different ways we have
17:11
clients that we are involved with focus
17:13
groups where we'll get it into let's say
17:17
we're building a safety device basically
17:19
and we will go to on you know
17:21
construction sites and contractor people
17:23
to actually test the product give us
17:25
feedback give us input and then make
17:27
refinements from there oh you're good
17:29
okay yeah yeah we're involved with focus
17:32
groups you know we do a lot of focus
17:34
group work with our clients so that's
17:38
one way of doing it another way our
17:40
clients have done it they've used
17:41
Kickstarter crowd funding company you
17:44
know if
17:45
crowd funding outfits to to get feedback
17:47
in input that's also super valuable
17:51
they're the early adopters of your
17:53
product and they're gonna have a
17:55
provisional first morning yeah yeah sure
18:01
guys want to put that in there right
18:03
yeah
18:05
it's becoming more of a landscape for
18:07
people picking ideas you know factory
18:10
owners looking at you know on starter
18:12
for good ideas that have momentum and
18:14
you know taking them to market before
18:16
you can get them to market which is a
18:18
scary thing actually but that much time
18:20
getting there but Kickstarter is a
18:22
really great place for you know getting
18:24
input and feedback and really as an
18:28
early adopter they're gonna have the
18:30
strongest voice right because they
18:31
they're they're putting ownership in the
18:33
development of your business and and you
18:35
you should give them that right to have
18:37
a voice and and communicate how they
18:39
want the product to move forward and
18:43
then a lot of our corporate clients you
18:44
know they already sort of have their
18:46
they understand their target demographic
18:48
and so they have their a whole process
18:50
of basically getting client feedback and
18:52
input you know before they bring
18:54
something to production right okay great
18:56
Carmen I've got tons of questions don't
18:58
see if you have any no no no go ahead go
19:00
ahead I have and just write a couple
19:01
down and we'll cover but you're actually
19:03
covering the questions some of the
19:04
questions that I had good yeah right on
19:07
well okay so this latter question where
19:10
you got people that have already got a
19:11
production line they're coming in later
19:13
making small refinements I guess it is
19:16
you know if you ever come across someone
19:19
that's looking to you know license
19:23
actually they're they know that there's
19:25
a patented product and they're there now
19:27
kind of laying on top of a licensed
19:30
product and they want you know I mean
19:32
out of them yeah so so not every clan of
19:35
ours goes to production it's a matter of
19:37
fact you have to have a strong stomach
19:39
for production it is not an easy process
19:42
it is you know if you get through phases
19:45
1 through 3 phase 4 which would be the
19:48
production development is literally the
19:49
Everest well whatever's Mount Rainier
19:52
climb basically okay so so you have to
19:57
have the right
19:58
financial means you need to have the
20:00
right backing you need to have there's a
20:03
lot to it you can plan right to
20:05
distribution sales marketing the whole
20:08
nine yeah it's it's it's super important
20:11
that all that stuff is in line before
20:12
you move forward but JD repeat your
20:17
question again sorry yeah yeah so
20:19
somebody comes in there and they leave
20:21
it through their attorney or otherwise
20:22
they find out that they're they want to
20:25
get into this market where there's
20:27
actually products that already had it
20:29
yeah they were never brought something
20:31
like that is actually a CLIA and then
20:33
they either have a license or need to
20:35
negotiate a license but they want to
20:37
make a derivative work you know an
20:38
improvement on that right okay kind of
20:40
network yeah so so there's sort of a
20:42
split in the road so the licensing piece
20:45
of it we do have clients that want to
20:47
just develop IEP and they want to be
20:50
able to understand it sort of the cost
20:52
of goods the the product development
20:54
cost tooling manufacturing cost they
20:58
want to be able to also gather all the
21:01
marketing distribution so when they sit
21:03
down with this group that they're
21:05
licensing to they have all this
21:07
information in front of them and and
21:08
someone can basically make a decision if
21:11
they what what the risk versus reward is
21:14
and what's the return on investment so
21:17
that that piece of it we do build
21:20
collateral for them on that and we do
21:22
that kind of work
21:23
for them you know through our network
21:26
and our supply chain but it is become
21:30
more of a viable direction for people
21:33
that don't you know want to take
21:35
something to production and and and the
21:37
risk that's involved with production so
21:39
they'll take their idea to core people
21:42
that are already in that network and
21:44
already have the distribution channels
21:46
and already have the the shelf space for
21:48
their product that's similar and that's
21:51
a very viable way to go it's a it's
21:53
definitely a little bit of money up
21:55
front to get to that point to have good
21:58
valid information and data even the
22:00
market research alone is going to be a
22:02
fairly considerable spend but it can pay
22:05
off if you if you have the right
22:08
connections within some of those
22:10
networks okay yeah
22:12
I just want to make sure that people
22:14
kind of heard that you know there's you
22:15
know that's really have to go to
22:16
production you can do the hard work and
22:19
be the inventor be the technologist not
22:22
necessarily have to be the businessman a
22:24
woman right works and a lot of times
22:26
people will also maybe not even license
22:29
it but they'll try to bring on angel
22:30
investors that will then you know take
22:32
that plan forward as well so there's
22:34
kind of a third road they can go to good
22:36
point good point something else you
22:38
mentioned I want to make sure we
22:39
highlight is the you know you think you
22:42
don't have to see patent protection
22:44
right you're moving forward you
22:45
mentioned that if you don't it's okay
22:48
you plan to be first to market whatever
22:49
it is you're doing but you ask me why is
22:52
that there could be others in the market
22:53
that have right right and so what we do
22:56
you know I think what you were getting
22:57
at isn't doing it was called an
22:59
infringement opinion figure out whether
23:01
what you're gonna try to put the market
23:03
whether there are other patent holders
23:05
or you know trolls or whoever else may
23:07
be out there before you go sell to the
23:10
public so it's just another highlight
23:12
one mentioned just to make sure you get
23:13
a professionals opinion if you feel like
23:15
you've seen products like yours out
23:17
there or you're just worried that you
23:19
think no I hate to get Submarine by a
23:22
non-practicing entity keep spending a
23:25
lot of money and effort into designing a
23:27
new product even if you're not planning
23:28
on getting patent protection you should
23:30
have an infringement to finland up right
23:34
yeah it's a risky proposition to move
23:37
too far forward in the product
23:38
development process without having your
23:40
intellectual property figured out there
23:42
and and it gets really complicated
23:45
because so many patents out there that
23:48
are written in a very general sort of
23:52
coverage and those are the most
23:54
dangerous because they can be
23:55
interpreted by attorneys differently and
23:58
and we've ran into situations like that
24:00:00
where it's like no we clearly think that
24:03:00
this patent reads like this and then
24:05:00
attorney B says no this is actually how
24:07:00
the company meant to interpret it and
24:09:00
it's like it leaves gray area and then
24:11:00
you find yourself in a sort of a you
24:13:00
know like a legal battle trying to
24:16:00
figure out does the intellectual
24:18:00
property really claiming here yes
24:21:00
totally
24:22:00
you got it and yeah so having someone
24:23:00
else look at it you know early on before
24:25:00
you get into
24:26:00
you know adversarial situation if we can
24:29:00
look at the set of claims and do what's
24:31:00
called a validity opinion and as it is
24:34:00
the case that patents get issued you
24:36:00
know and two-three years ago with the
24:38:00
laws change and in the patents we're
24:40:00
looking to enforce them today have to
24:43:00
stand up to today's law since the work
24:46:00
was an attorney I can help you of course
24:47:00
identify whether your patent claims
24:50:00
would be valid even before asserting any
24:52:00
kind of infringement or you know in the
24:54:00
defense I how's that yeah and you bring
24:58:00
up an interesting point there's another
24:59:00
kind of beauty that's happening with in
25:01:00
the patent world and and I'm I don't
25:03:00
know too much about it but I'll bring it
25:05:00
up that I believe that when you do file
25:08:00
under a US patent that we're starting to
25:10:00
get coverage in Japan as well as Canada
25:13:00
is that is that I know there was some
25:15:00
movement in that direction where you're
25:17:00
going to be able to get coverage in
25:19:00
multiple countries guys Bob your head of
25:22:00
me I think there's a pilot program that
25:25:00
they're rolling out soon on that I
25:26:00
haven't got the latest I don't want to
25:28:00
report on that now but that's awesome
25:29:00
for sure you can follow you know patent
25:32:00
cooperation treaty you know that's been
25:34:00
the case for several years now and
25:37:00
that's up to 90 different countries of
25:38:00
course including Canada and neighboring
25:41:00
North American countries so the other
25:44:00
course be a stick with the PCT is that
25:46:00
you get to save tons of money you have
25:48:00
this one examiner doing the search for
25:50:00
the whole world
25:51:00
I believe this pilot program is similar
25:53:00
but illega Matic investing in all three
25:56:00
of those participating countries this is
25:58:00
save on project you know so I just I got
26:01:00
I'm gonna write that down will make sure
26:03:00
you get less there's more information
26:04:00
about that yeah it's just to me this
26:09:00
this particular discussion is so
26:13:00
important because it pertains to so many
26:16:00
things all across the board and you know
26:19:00
what's great about Bob and JD is that
26:21:00
you know Bob you're I commend you on
26:25:00
really steering your clients into not
26:29:00
just you know developing a product but
26:31:00
to really think about okay what are you
26:33:00
gonna do when this products made do you
26:35:00
have patent protection I mean you're
26:38:00
three phases but there
26:39:00
so much in between and that I just love
26:42:00
that we're letting clients know this is
26:44:00
not something that's easily done and you
26:46:00
really should be done with caution and
26:48:00
get people like yourselves on the right
26:51:00
track it's so important to do it the
26:53:00
right way yeah I think that's you bring
26:55:00
up a good point that's the beauty with
26:56:00
working at the studio is that they'll
26:59:00
guide you in that right direction and
27:01:00
you know again like we were talking
27:04:00
earlier it's it's about you know we if
27:06:00
our clients don't succeed we don't
27:08:00
succeed so if you're developing a
27:10:00
product and it gets shelved which that
27:12:00
does happen a lot that if we can't bring
27:16:00
that to market with you and and that's
27:17:00
not a success then we can't show it in
27:19:00
our portfolio and and it doesn't grow my
27:23:00
business so it's super important that
27:25:00
that you know it is a collaborative we
27:28:00
do work as a team and we have almost as
27:30:00
much skin in the game well as much skin
27:32:00
in the game as our clients and you know
27:35:00
it really is we put work really hard we
27:38:00
choose you know who we want to work with
27:40:00
we want to make sure that you know that
27:42:00
that person has the ability and has the
27:44:00
connections to take that product and
27:47:00
make sure that the it has an
27:48:00
intellectual property it is a viable
27:50:00
product that you know it's going to have
27:53:00
some level of success yeah I mean I know
27:57:00
all three of us on here you know carmine
27:58:00
but we all worked really well on high
28:00:00
quality and it's just I know I
28:02:00
personally work hard on making sure if I
28:04:00
make a referral or you know connect
28:05:00
people with other professionals I take
28:09:00
that I think it's so seriously because
28:11:00
you're totally right is I want to keep
28:13:00
my client succeed and I don't just want
28:15:00
to deliver a document or a piece of
28:17:00
paper I want them to actually have if
28:19:00
they want commercial success that they
28:20:00
get it you know and then you can see all
28:23:00
the way through so getting in touch with
28:24:00
people like investors banker is even
28:27:00
right I mean CPAs people that do
28:31:00
distribution factoring so yeah we need a
28:35:00
lot we've made a lot of those type of
28:36:00
connections where you know our client
28:38:00
I'll be developing our product that
28:39:00
we've already been in an industry that
28:41:00
we work in and you know it's really just
28:43:00
an informal you know you should talk to
28:45:00
this person they've you know they're
28:47:00
they've got this product in the market
28:48:00
it's been very successful you know and
28:50:00
we just kind of let it play out you know
28:52:00
and
28:53:00
and it we've we've built some great
28:55:00
relationships that way and and really
28:58:00
help people along the way and they you
29:00:00
know keep moving forward and keep
29:01:00
developing new products and you know
29:03:00
have a lot of success it's all about
29:07:00
your network you know anything is a you
29:10:00
know and our clients know and you guys
29:13:00
know what we all do and even what our
29:15:00
clients do it's not a low-cost thing it
29:18:00
is out but you know what the amount of
29:20:00
time that JD or bother you put into it
29:22:00
the energy exchange I don't think that
29:25:00
our clients realize in the background
29:27:00
how much is really going on and that's
29:29:00
why it's good to have that communication
29:31:00
with your client so they know really
29:32:00
what's happening there is so much work
29:34:00
to take a product to market or get a
29:36:00
patent through our documentation and
29:38:00
it's great I love the way that you guys
29:40:00
are communicating with your clients
29:42:00
because it's so important to know that
29:44:00
yeah it's definitely a fine line between
29:47:00
you know passion creativity you know
29:51:00
willingness to work together we've you
29:53:00
know we've had relationships that you
29:56:00
know you know instantly that it's not
29:58:00
you know the personality piece is not
30:00:00
going to work and it is a relationship
30:01:00
and transparency and communication is
30:04:00
super key some of our best clients have
30:08:00
it's been that sort of open-door policy
30:10:00
and we've been able to get things done
30:12:00
an amazing amount of speed and with
30:14:00
amazing amount of efficiency when we
30:16:00
have all parties on board and going in
30:19:00
the same direction I agree we got about
30:21:00
two minutes left Bobby just want to ask
30:24:00
you one thing about your theory on rapid
30:28:00
prototyping and how 3d printing is
30:30:00
taking over the industry a lot of people
30:32:00
think it's much easier for guys like you
30:34:00
but really it's still a lot of work
30:35:00
right I mean we got about two minutes
30:37:00
you just give me a little bit idea on it
30:38:00
yeah we have a number 3d printers here
30:41:00
we have one actually behind me that's a
30:43:00
FDM critter and then we have another
30:45:00
form labs in the back space it's
30:47:00
terrific it allows us to basically do a
30:50:00
lot of refinement in the matter of hours
30:53:00
so when we get a product in 3d space I
30:56:00
might look great on the screen but we
30:58:00
got to build it and you got to put it
30:59:00
together and get it in our hands and
31:01:00
rapid prototyping where you would spend
31:04:00
weeks between different iterations of
31:06:00
the design
31:07:00
now you spend hours and it the materials
31:10:00
are getting better and better we're able
31:12:00
to build stuff that people contest on
31:15:00
you know in hand like fully functional
31:17:00
prototypes before they commit to the
31:19:00
very expensive hard to lean for mass
31:23:00
production so looks like the way Nova
31:40:00
sadly all right very good
31:42:00
all right thanks guys you're all set you
31:46:00
uh you ready to wrap up all good man
31:50:00
yeah I know time flew I sure we all do
31:53:00
we got other stuff to get off to and
31:54:00
other adventures I'm excited to get into
31:56:00
more of this this is gonna open up my
31:58:00
eyes I took a bunch of notes here put
32:01:00
things we haven't even talked about on
32:02:00
the show yet we need to do a lot more of
32:05:00
I think Bob is a really neat perspective
32:08:00
when YouTube comments so we should work
32:10:00
up some to-do lists to get hit up this
32:12:00
kind of discussion later yeah and if you
32:14:00
guys ever want to do a follow-up I'm
32:16:00
happy to join in yeah I totally agree
32:18:00
this is what we want you know between
32:20:00
all of us we have so much information I
32:23:00
mean it kind of covers the full spectrum
32:24:00
of really the process that is so
32:27:00
important it really does yeah you know
32:31:00
and the thing is we're not just making
32:32:00
this stuff up and we do this every day
32:34:00
right we can play you know the receding
32:37:00
hairline here very good Bob thank you so
32:46:00
much for being on the show today JD is
32:49:00
always excellent co-host my friend I
32:51:00
really appreciate you jumping on I know
32:52:00
both you guys are super busy these kind
32:55:00
of discussions really help out our
32:57:00
listeners it helps out myself
32:59:00
I always learn something on the show so
33:01:00
super happy if you're listening in
33:05:00
please go on out to go bold IP com go
33:11:00
big go bold show leave a message for JD
33:14:00
let him know how's it going no tuned
33:16:00
into his youtube channel got some great
33:18:00
information on there and if you get a
33:20:00
chance please go on out to Google Play
33:22:00
or iTunes leave us a rating or a review
33:25:00
would be awesome if I could hear from
33:27:00
you guys and let us know what we're
33:29:00
covering what we need to cover some
33:30:00
content you would like to hear it'd be
33:32:00
great so for myself for Bob for JD
33:35:00
thanks for listening and we'll catch you
33:36:00
next time on the go big go bold IP show