The History of Innovation in The United States; Warren and Carmine Interview Robert Shenk as he Takes us Back to The Beginning of Innovation in America

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Podcast Notes

1YouTube generated podcast notes, please excuse any typos.
hi everyone and welcome to the ILP
0:03
Network
0:04
I am carmine danesco your co-host for
0:07
today's show of total innovation we have
0:09
a great show today Warren and I have
0:11
been talking about this we've been
0:12
waiting for this show because we're both
0:14
history buffs we love this kind of stuff
0:16
and I can't believe that we are going to
0:19
be able to introduce something that I
0:21
didn't even know about that existed I'll
0:23
bring Warren on we'll talk a little bit
0:25
and then we'll bring our guest on hey
0:27
Warren you over there I am I'm up here
0:28
in Connecticut I'm doing good man I know
0:31
you're always traveling around it's
0:33
great to get you back into your home
0:35
base there what did you what we working
0:37
on this weekend anything fun well I did
0:39
have a side excursion to Harvard
0:41
University earlier in the week where I
0:43
went to the was to an event with the
0:46
chairman of the astrophysics department
0:48
a good friend of mine wrote a book
0:49
called missile man about his dad who was
0:51
wearing a nuclear ballistic missile
0:53
program the United States so that's
0:54
going to be the topic of a future show
0:56
just to give a little shameless plug
0:58
there but it was quite a day up there so
1:01
it's all good you know when when
1:04
somebody comes up to usually and this is
1:06
the funny part about it says hey how was
1:08
your week huh you know war is like one
1:09
of the only guys that could say oh yeah
1:11
I was talking to a guy that ran the
1:13
missile program for United States I was
1:15
at Harvard I mean the stuff that you act
1:17
like it's nothing it's just crap I'm
1:20
easily distracted come on by my bright
1:23
object so you call me and tell me that
1:26
something run out of Harvard or like
1:28
this weekend I'm going up to the to
1:30
Woodstock to the original grounds to see
1:32
a concert up there and just just call me
1:34
with something about burning whatever it
1:36
is I'll be there just give me 24 hours
1:39
you're one of those guys that always has
1:41
a bag packed by the door you ready like
1:43
run ass that's what's so great about the
1:48
show and when you when we were talking
1:50
about doing this you know sometimes you
1:53
run out of topics or you repeat topics
1:55
or you talk about things but with the
1:57
show we're gonna be bringing on so many
1:59
different things it's gonna be a lot of
2:00
fun like today's topic and you know I've
2:02
been kind of waiting for this show why
2:03
don't you um bring on our guest and that
2:06
will kind of get going yes so I want to
2:07
introduce Rob Schenck but I'll be before
2:09
we get started with him I
2:11
want to just say I met Rob recently had
2:16
an event in Virginia right outside of
2:18
Washington DC and Mount Vernon when the
2:21
US Patent Office had an honorary event
2:24
for the sign of the 10 million patent
2:26
the United States was a significant
2:28
event so I was really excited to go
2:30
there and I really enjoyed meeting Rob
2:32
he gave me extra time and bring him in
2:35
the second to bring up to speed but I
2:37
was so impressed with his knowledge and
2:39
his background and and so forth and so
2:41
let me just say Rob welcome welcome to
2:44
the show Thank You Warren and Thank You
2:46
Karmen pleasure to meet you both
2:48
well I had this the show in mind for
2:52
quite a while since we met and really
2:54
sharing the experience that I had with
2:56
as many inventors as we can across the
2:58
country who are reaching out to but just
3:01
to get started Rob maybe you could just
3:03
before we get into the Mount Vernon and
3:05
George Washington and all the historical
3:06
stuff about innovation tell us a little
3:08
bit about yourself where you got started
3:10
and how you you moved into the position
3:12
that you're at now thanks Lauren I'm
3:13
currently the senior vice president for
3:16
visitor engagement here at Mount Vernon
3:18
and so my response mode is range
3:20
everything from kind of our history
3:22
interpreters in our front office all the
3:25
way to our marketing and our digital new
3:26
media team my backgrounds really in
3:29
digital internet product development and
3:32
worked for a long time at both America
3:34
Online and etrade but always had a
3:36
lifelong interest in history and finally
3:40
tried to merge those two things and was
3:42
able to do that at a group called the
3:43
Civil War trust and I later came to
3:45
Mount Vernon from here to do the same
3:47
and then they gave me these additional
3:48
responsibilities but I've always enjoyed
3:50
innovation and I think here at Mount
3:52
Vernon has been fun to kind of delve
3:54
into that subject even for my historical
3:56
point of view so before we get too far
3:59
into this just just very quickly for our
4:02
listeners if they want to plan a trip to
4:05
Mount Vernon or learn more about it
4:07
what's the website and how do they get
4:09
in touch how do they know absolutely
4:12
where we're located about 13 miles south
4:16
of Washington DC it's the original home
4:18
of George and Martha Washington it's
4:20
really one of the great treasures here
4:22
in the United States and for
4:25
having visited or want to learn more you
4:26
can certainly go to Mount Vernon org
4:28
gets all spelled out you'll learn a lot
4:31
and see a lot we've got a lot of great
4:32
educational resources on the site as
4:34
well well what really hit me Rob was the
4:40
proximity to Washington DC so if anybody
4:43
is coming in for a visit to the town or
4:47
maybe you know the traditional visits to
4:49
the Capitol and White House and stuff
4:51
it's really worthwhile to to add this to
4:54
your itinerary and there's no excuse
4:56
even if you don't run a car grab an uber
4:58
we over at home you can it's easy to get
5:02
to we're open 365 days a year and we've
5:04
been open for a hundred and sixty plus
5:06
years so yes we look forward to
5:09
welcoming all well talked about talked
5:11
about job security there you know what's
5:20
funny what's up what's funny about that
5:21
is when we talk about George Washington
5:24
and his house and then we put in the
5:27
word innovation you know it just doesn't
5:29
seem to go you don't think about
5:30
innovation being back then and really
5:33
what what Warren told me about this this
5:37
estate and the things that are there it
5:39
really was innovative right Lorne
5:41
absolutely and you know we may be robbed
5:46
you can take us in that direction you
5:47
know I first a little bit about George
5:50
Washington's an innovator and then we'll
5:52
get into the moment but talk to us about
5:56
George Washington innovator and what
5:59
innovation meant back then it's up to 17
6:02
late seventeen hundreds
6:03
well you're absolutely right I think
6:05
most Americans when we think about
6:07
innovation and the history of innovation
6:08
in America will think of maybe the
6:10
industrial revolution of the late 1800s
6:12
or even more modern times and venture
6:15
the first computer and work on the
6:17
internet developments of late but really
6:19
it's it's remarkable to look back and
6:21
see how even at the earliest chapters of
6:24
America there's a really great interest
6:26
in focus on innovation Washington is
6:29
fascinated by technology you see it all
6:32
those letters you see it of all of his
6:34
activities child's life you know yes he
6:36
was a general yes it was a press
6:38
a politician but he loved being a firmer
6:40
now farmer doesn't always been a signify
6:42
innovator but to Washington it was a
6:45
very innovative science driven pursuit
6:48
and he really looked at as such he not
6:50
only kind of employed scientific methods
6:53
to kind of develop better crop rotations
6:55
better crop usage but he also was a
6:59
great user of the most modern
7:00
agricultural tools and machines I own
7:04
systems called the hippopotamus which
7:07
somehow dragged mud out of the river as
7:09
fertilizer he used other rolling
7:11
mechanisms to help prepare fields he
7:14
developed new plows and technologies he
7:17
built this treading barn which actually
7:20
was a more innovative way to tread wheat
7:22
so he's a guy who's really after
7:24
technology and sees it not only as a way
7:27
forward for America to be more
7:29
self-sufficient and a stronger nation in
7:31
terms of its own domestic manufacturing
7:33
agriculture but just also a labor
7:35
savings means I think did he develop
7:37
those tools and equipment on his own
7:40
that he worked with other innovators and
7:43
inventors and more the latter he was
7:48
very plugged into he's got more of a
7:50
modern term he was a correspondent with
7:52
mannalie leading mines here in America
7:56
but also in Europe
7:57
he was constantly after innovation and
8:00
what you could kind of see it and find
8:01
and acquire he was quick to do so as
8:04
president United States he was also a
8:06
very vocal proponent for innovation it's
8:09
interesting to note that in the very
8:11
first State of the Union address
8:13
Washington is speaking directly to
8:15
Congress and recommending that they
8:17
follow through on the constitutional
8:19
mandate to build a patent system or some
8:22
system that would encourage domestic
8:24
manufacturing innovations well
8:26
Washington in his very first political
8:28
address is there in 1790 is saying those
8:32
things so we were just talking to the
8:34
director Janka of the Patent Office who
8:36
was your star gust yes ago and he was
8:39
saying the same thing and so we learned
8:41
that the the Patent Office was the
8:43
second building built in Washington DC
8:45
after the White House and even Thomas
8:48
Jefferson was one of the early
8:49
commissioners but but tell us a little
8:51
bit about
8:52
I mentioned to him that the there was my
8:55
understanding that the the grist mill in
8:56
Mount Vernon was the second patent that
8:58
signed but he corrected me and said it
9:00
was actually the third about that early
9:03
patent system and how George Washington
9:06
first came across the path and how that
9:08
led to the Jews getting involved
9:10
well Congress listened to Washington
9:12
they did pass the patent law which he
9:14
quickly signed into law and he was as
9:17
mandated by that law signing patents
9:19
very early in his presidency so he
9:21
signed I believe around a hundred and
9:23
fifty patents during his presidency so
9:26
patent one was on the creation of potash
9:28
real exciting subject patent it was kind
9:31
of some innovative method of producing
9:33
candles you know that I'm sure that was
9:36
interesting too in its own right but
9:38
patent number three which is one I hope
9:40
we can talk about here yeah the Oliver
9:42
Evans automated mill system a real
9:45
interesting advancement and how to
9:48
automate mill the milling of grain
9:51
Washington had owned his own grist mill
9:54
here at Mount Vernon and was very soon
9:57
as I said an innovation so this patent
10:00
comes to his desk for signature number
10:02
three and Washington quickly signs it
10:06
and in then he writes a letter to his
10:09
some folks here at Mount Vernon and they
10:10
do eventually visit an installation of
10:12
the Occoquan River just south of us
10:14
they've had this system he saw it loved
10:16
it and ordered it installed
10:18
Evans brothers not Oliver himself but
10:21
his brothers came actually installed it
10:23
here in 1791 and it became a part of his
10:26
grist mill and it greatly improved not
10:29
only the manufacture of superfine flour
10:31
which received a price premium but also
10:35
reduced the amount of labor necessary to
10:37
operate the mill so how did how did it
10:40
actually work when he ordered the mill
10:43
did they come over and build it for more
10:48
and it's very kind of it's not just one
10:51
system it's a whole series of
10:53
transportation and subsystems used in
10:56
the preparation and milling and
10:59
packaging of grain so there's all these
11:01
interesting elevators and pulleys and
11:03
systems moving grain
11:05
it's up and down through the floors into
11:07
different subsystems both cleaning
11:09
preparing and then grinding and then
11:12
spreading drying and moving into
11:15
packaging so it's a complete system and
11:18
it allowed Washington to employ fewer
11:21
folks at the mill and he was always very
11:23
interested in kind of automation that
11:26
did that and he was it's interesting
11:27
throughout Washington laters like he's
11:29
always looking for labor saving
11:31
techniques and systems yeah and when you
11:37
see it in person and Rob gave us a
11:40
private you know tour in place it was
11:41
wearing by the way Carmen we're gonna
11:43
we're gonna bring in some b-roll we need
11:45
to get that from Rob or we'll pull it
11:47
off the internet to show people as we're
11:48
talking here you know what this
11:51
contraption three stories right we do
11:55
have a virtual tour on our website I
11:58
think it's at Mount Vernon org slash
12:00
virtual tour and in there you can access
12:03
all the floors of the grist mill and so
12:05
you'll be able to see videos a lot of
12:07
these systems that were talking about
12:09
that's amazing so now now now so he used
12:13
the mill primarily for producing whiskey
12:16
is that is that accurate first it was
12:18
really straight up for the production of
12:20
one so one of Washington's great crack
12:23
cash crops and really one of the
12:25
important things that Washington does he
12:27
moves away from tobacco and moves
12:29
towards grain he sees grain is less
12:31
under the control of the British
12:33
government prior to the establishment
12:34
United States and one that would be
12:37
domestically consumed and also better
12:40
suited to the soil here in Virginia so
12:42
you know when you grow it the next step
12:44
is you have to mill it and kind of you
12:47
know Washington invests in the finest
12:50
grindstones these French bur stones that
12:53
are like the you know the BMW's a burst
12:59
that's probably in this case that's
13:01
right all right no but anyway he's
13:05
grinding the super fine quality flour
13:07
and so that's the flour that's getting
13:10
the premium markup in the market he's
13:13
also grinding on the lesser grindstones
13:15
corn and other
13:16
what you're gonna be used for animal
13:18
feed or other kind of domestic purposes
13:20
and we're is he selling all this where
13:22
is he distributing and selling it how
13:23
does it have the marketplace where
13:25
affected domestically but also in some
13:27
cases overseas so Washington is selling
13:30
into the local market places that are
13:33
that are growing and so he sees this as
13:35
supporting the growth of the United
13:38
States but he's also shipping grains
13:40
into the Caribbean he's also an occasion
13:42
even to Europe so he's looking at the
13:46
larger market places of the 18th century
13:48
well it's so fascinating and I'm just
13:51
thinking you know George Washington LLC
13:56
have to think about let me just point
13:58
out and maybe this is interesting to
14:00
your audience that this whole
14:03
installation of the oliver evans system
14:06
and the production efficiencies were
14:08
talking about happening during his
14:09
presidency that's what I was wondering
14:16
not so so what was it under a different
14:19
company that people know that he owned
14:21
the company this is his business this is
14:24
what Washington does he is a farmer he
14:26
is a self-sufficient farmer and I think
14:28
again we have to put herself again back
14:30
in the 18th century you know they didn't
14:35
really have let's say professional
14:36
politicians of the 18th century people
14:38
really didn't know that's not what you
14:40
really needed your own self-sufficiency
14:42
and Men and I'll use that term here
14:45
because it was in that case in the 18th
14:47
century men sought to be self-sufficient
14:49
through their own economic activities so
14:53
so now we're these Mills being just in
14:56
terms of the context outside of
14:57
Washington around around what was the 13
15:00
colonies and where these Mills built
15:02
elsewhere as well and and and and in
15:04
fact in terms of manufacturing or other
15:07
major developments going on not just
15:09
with say grain but maybe fabrics and and
15:13
you know those type of Mills is that was
15:16
that all flourishing at the same same
15:18
time would you say well you know Mills
15:20
flour mills Grist Mills are they go back
15:24
to medieval times in terms of their
15:25
construct and were obviously very
15:28
prevalent they were essential
15:30
parts of any sort of nation or country
15:33
because they were vital towards the
15:35
making of bread if you will so you know
15:39
there hadn't been a whole lot of
15:40
tremendous innovation in terms of mills
15:42
for a long time so all of our evans
15:44
system is kind of noteworthy in that
15:46
regard you know I think that yes was
15:51
there innovation in other categories
15:52
absolutely so Washington although this
15:55
doesn't really happen in during
15:57
Washington's days per se but you have
15:59
the first kind of automated loom
16:01
technology so again looms are starting
16:04
to get more sophisticated and more
16:06
pattern driven which you know if you
16:08
know that history kind of leads to some
16:09
digital innovations much later it's
16:13
backing up on that vector so there's
16:15
some really interesting things happen in
16:16
that regard too but I can point out you
16:18
know going back to the thesis that the
16:20
late 18th century was a far more
16:22
innovative time than people give it
16:24
credit for Washington was also very
16:26
active in promoting balloons and balloon
16:28
flying in aerial flights interesting
16:30
note the Washington issues the very
16:32
first you know patent or actually a
16:38
passport I should say for aerial
16:40
transport in the United States he learns
16:43
of you know the growth of balloons and
16:46
France and he writes a letter to his
16:48
friends over there saying expects his
16:49
friends to arrive by balloon not by ship
16:52
and so he so he's kind of you know
16:54
looking forward to a day of aerial
16:56
transportation which nesstar 100 years
16:59
later so let's just just shift now just
17:02
because it's always fascinating to me so
17:03
so did he get into the the whiskey
17:08
business as an outgrowth of all this was
17:11
it it was a natural progression or was
17:13
that something cool in the day had ended
17:16
up happening because you know and you
17:19
weren't you would ask that question
17:20
earlier and yes he does use ground you
17:26
know grain from the grist mill in his
17:29
distilling operations obviously that's
17:30
one of the key inputs towards a
17:32
distilling operation so Washington was
17:35
late to the distilling business it's
17:39
interesting when you look at
17:40
Washington's life and being the general
17:42
of the con
17:43
mental army he had seen both the benefit
17:46
and the ills of alcohol alcohol
17:48
consumption was far more prevalent in
17:50
the 18th century by the way his Miller
17:53
his prized Miller had a drinking problem
17:56
some speculate that automation was a way
17:58
to kind of get around human foibles if
18:01
you will so Washington was always wary
18:05
of supplying the spirits that might
18:09
cause social ills but he also saw the
18:12
benefits of it
18:13
he had a Scottish farm manager who
18:18
convinced him that he had all the right
18:20
necessary inputs to enter this business
18:22
he is first trepidatious about it but he
18:26
actually builds his first two stills in
18:28
his cooperage and gives it a try so
18:30
think about you know failing fast or
18:32
trying you know innovative techniques
18:34
he's not all-in he's gonna try it and so
18:36
he I guess these stills up and running
18:39
produces the whiskey puts it in barrels
18:41
and sends it off the market and the
18:43
money comes right back
18:44
now again also in 18th century most of
18:46
Washington's products it takes a long
18:48
time to get the cash back you gotta send
18:51
it to the Caribbean that's you know
18:53
weeks and weeks of transport time but
18:56
whiskey went from the spill into the
18:59
barrel onto the wagon up to Alexandria
19:02
and the cash came right back and that
19:03
impressed Washington to a great degree
19:05
so in true Washingtonian fashion he
19:08
doubles down and builds a really
19:11
fantastic much more capacious distillery
19:14
which had five copper pot stills in it a
19:18
full you know floor designed to kind of
19:20
support whiskey production and by 1799
19:23
the last year of his life he's producing
19:25
11,000 gallons of whiskey and other
19:28
spirits which at the time make him one
19:30
of the largest whiskey distillers in the
19:33
United States and again for your
19:35
audience let me point out he enters the
19:37
whiskey business as an entrepreneur
19:38
after he is president he's not playing
19:42
golf he's not you know fox hunting he's
19:45
not on the speaker's turf sir was
19:47
inventing a brand new business that
19:50
actually becomes one of his most
19:51
profitable businesses - yeah that's what
19:54
you had said and so he's amazing
19:56
because you know when you think of
19:58
George Washington he's really the father
20:01
of the country you know there we had
20:03
such amazing founding fathers and I just
20:04
finished a biography on Hamilton and
20:06
obviously Adams and they're all bright
20:08
but there's something about George
20:09
Washington and was he was sort of the
20:11
Babe Ruth you know is the baseball you
20:14
know he lives in the country so I'm sure
20:16
when he took the lead on something like
20:18
this it you know probably I mean
20:21
probably from a marketing perspective he
20:23
was pretty well known right it was
20:24
pretty easy for him to make connections
20:26
and get in business right absolutely
20:28
although it is interesting to note that
20:29
by this stage whiskeys not bottled it's
20:33
not labeled in the way that we see it
20:35
from up from a modern branding point me
20:37
to see wouldn't find George Washington's
20:39
whisky as a brand it simply was a
20:41
commodity product put into barrels and
20:44
sold into the marketplace and sold an
20:46
unbranded way it wasn't even aged
20:49
because there was no market place for
20:51
aged spirits which is you know something
20:54
that's very prevalent today maybe
20:56
speaking to what the these spirits
20:58
drinking habits were in the 18th century
21:00
they just wanted it and water in great
21:02
quantities let's just attack a little
21:06
bit here because that all is is
21:07
amazingly fascinating and thanks Rob for
21:09
all your knowledge and sharing this with
21:11
us but so we you hosted an event a
21:14
couple weeks ago signing of the 10
21:17
million patent so we're going to jump
21:19
from the founding of the country which
21:20
was founded you know right in technology
21:23
and from day one and then patents and so
21:25
forth to the modern day first of all
21:29
tell us a little bit about what you had
21:30
to do to pull that whole event together
21:31
because it was it was pretty massive and
21:33
some of the people they were very
21:34
impressive well we do a lot of great
21:37
events here at mount burns so we're not
21:39
unaccustomed to putting on events we did
21:42
get introduced to the US Patent and
21:45
Trade Office and we had had a
21:46
conversation with them they had said
21:49
that they were looking for a venue for
21:50
this event and I immediately thought of
21:53
the third patent that Oliver Evans
21:55
patent thinking of Washington is the
21:57
first sign of patents I thought you know
21:59
this would be the natural place I know
22:01
my point of view but the natural place
22:04
to celebrate the 10 millionth patent at
22:06
the home of the president who signed the
22:08
first patents and
22:10
to bring the US Patent and Trade Office
22:11
folks out and showed them the grist mill
22:13
and showed them the working Oliver Evans
22:16
system I mean like we all have they fell
22:18
in love with it and kind of immediately
22:19
saw that as the venue for the so you
22:22
know Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross
22:24
was there again all that all the Chiefs
22:26
of the US patent trade office members of
22:28
Congress and it was a really exciting
22:30
and wonderful event and war I appreciate
22:33
you being there as well and I think it
22:35
was a lot of fun just be able to share
22:36
that history with a bigger audience and
22:39
connect you know our first president
22:41
with our lased
22:42
and kind of all the efforts and
22:44
innovations since then well you had an
22:46
amazing array of guests like you said
22:48
Wilbur Ross the senator Chris Coons was
22:50
there was a who's been terrific for
22:53
inventors in the patent system Darryl
22:55
Issa congressman and so forth so as we
22:57
see was fun fun to go around and speak
23:00
to all them do you think what do you
23:01
think George Washington would say today
23:03
though he came back quickly a 10 million
23:06
patents would he be I mean he's got he
23:08
would be probably pretty shocked under
23:10
any circumstances but something tells me
23:13
also that he would adjust pretty quickly
23:15
and say hey that's where we always
23:16
intended it to go what do you think I
23:17
definitely think the letter I definitely
23:20
think he would be so impressed and so
23:23
pleased as to the innovative history of
23:26
the United States of America and I think
23:29
his words there in that in that first
23:31
State of the Union and to see the fruit
23:34
of that he would love that and I know as
23:37
a president he would continue to be a
23:39
supporter of innovation in American
23:41
manufacturing prowess hey hey Rob hey
23:45
Rob real quick question I have is you
23:47
know we always hear about George
23:48
watching him you know prior before he
23:51
came president and after what about in
23:54
his younger years did he show this
23:56
entrepreneurial things that he was going
23:59
to be this business guy or I mean did it
24:01:00
just happen or you know was he like this
24:04:00
you know earlier on in his ears or do we
24:06:00
know well you know I think you know when
24:10:00
I spoke of kind of his agricultural
24:11:00
focus and his scientific methods of
24:14:00
focusing on agricultural output that
24:16:00
happens at a very early age and you see
24:19:00
him being methodical doing tests he's
24:21:00
you know even creates boxes where he
24:24:00
trying different manures and different
24:25:00
grains to see which one will grow and so
24:28:00
he's really employing modern scientific
24:31:00
methods to figure out how to get the
24:33:00
maximum yield and so that's happening at
24:36:00
a pretty early age you know so I would
24:40:00
say likely yes Wow he used that did he
24:44:00
had that same approach in the military
24:46:00
you know we always know him as a leader
24:48:00
of men but was he always trying to get
24:50:00
his hands on the best equipment or
24:52:00
probably their resources were limited
24:54:00
but I'm wondering from from from that
24:56:00
perspective do you know anything about
24:57:00
that yeah I mean the resources certainly
24:59:00
were limited I think you know washing
25:01:00
was always grateful for any weaponry and
25:04:00
supplies that he could get his hands on
25:06:00
it was certainly touch-and-go so it was
25:08:00
a more difficult environment I would say
25:09:00
to innovate in from from a materials
25:12:00
point of view Washington learns many
25:16:00
hard lessons during the American
25:17:00
Revolution needs to feed it quite
25:18:00
significantly the Battle of Long Island
25:21:00
and all the way down before he crosses
25:23:00
the the Delaware famously and so
25:25:00
Washington's learning from his defeats
25:27:00
he's learning from the setbacks and
25:29:00
again he adopts a strategy which is to
25:33:00
to not put all the chips on the table
25:36:00
but not risk the all-or-nothing battles
25:38:00
so again if I put a kind of an innovator
25:41:00
terms he wants to be around to continue
25:43:00
to learn fast and kind of be ever more
25:47:00
successful you know when at Valley Forge
25:49:00
that terrible winter they invest a lot
25:51:00
in training they bring in European
25:54:00
military experts to teach drill and to
25:57:00
kind of instill tighter discipline and
25:59:00
effectiveness and that pays off in the
26:02:00
later years of the war it's interesting
26:04:00
you know it is a thingy he tests see
26:07:00
what the results are and then and then
26:09:00
moves on depending upon you know the
26:11:00
success of it that's right very much so
26:13:00
well that's wonderful well carmine do
26:16:00
you have any other questions I'm it's so
26:18:00
fascinating we'll just say going all day
26:20:00
but I know we have a half hour yeah yeah
26:22:00
we have still some few minutes left real
26:25:00
quick I mean Rob you as running this
26:29:00
facility you know I love history but you
26:32:00
probably get some people there that and
26:34:00
when they first get there they could
26:36:00
care less but when they start here
26:37:00
the stories in the background and what's
26:40:00
happening I mean you just must see their
26:42:00
faces light up because it is so
26:44:00
interesting right absolutely and Carmen
26:47:00
great point because as I said most
26:48:00
people know washington's president and
26:50:00
he might know him it as general i had a
26:53:00
group of silicon valley executives and
26:55:00
he looked like they didn't want to be at
26:58:00
mount vernon and we took them into the
27:01:00
grist mill and the distillery we started
27:02:00
talking about the topics we were time on
27:04:00
today also you can see the light bulbs
27:06:00
going off and you can see awesome we
27:07:00
were making a connection to a community
27:09:00
that might not otherwise have had the
27:11:00
natural interest and so it's always fun
27:13:00
to expose people the best part of
27:15:00
washington's life in in history you know
27:18:00
and i also would say being in the
27:19:00
whiskey business and i should point out
27:21:00
that our distillery at mount vernon
27:23:00
actually does produce whiskey using
27:26:00
eighteenth-century methods using the
27:28:00
generals recipe and when you can offer
27:30:00
someone a taste of some very fine
27:32:00
whiskey and say that this derives from
27:35:00
Washington's own business believe me
27:37:00
there's a whole different audience you
27:39:00
can tap into yeah oh I believe it and
27:42:00
that's what makes it so much fun is that
27:44:00
you know you guys are really not you're
27:46:00
not recreating you're keeping it alive
27:48:00
exactly how it was done and that's what
27:51:00
I just love about it I mean it's such a
27:52:00
gorgeous I'm looking at your website
27:54:00
it's such a gorgeous grounds I mean how
27:57:00
could you you know you know just walking
27:58:00
around people are probably just excited
28:00:00
to do that
28:01:00
people are super inspired some of the
28:03:00
most amazing iconic Jews in America and
28:05:00
again if you haven't been to Mount
28:06:00
Vernon I always invite you to come and
28:08:00
you haven't been in a while there's a
28:09:00
lot of new attractions and features that
28:12:00
we'd love to share with you we're always
28:14:00
looking for innovative ways to share the
28:15:00
story of Washington with with audiences
28:17:00
both here and be our digital assets and
28:20:00
our website so it's a very content rich
28:22:00
website a lot of offerings there to
28:25:00
consider if you're not at Mount Vernon
28:27:00
today no no it's just awesome that's
28:31:00
that's great I'm I myself I mean I've
28:34:00
been up to DC several times never really
28:37:00
thought about it and it's not that far
28:39:00
away just to get out of the city take a
28:41:00
ride I mean you could spend the day
28:42:00
there you can and there's a lot more to
28:45:00
see than just that house so I mentioned
28:46:00
the grist mill and the distillery site
28:48:00
are about three miles away from the core
28:50:00
part of this
28:51:00
and yes that was still part of watching
28:53:00
his land because here in Mount Vernon he
28:54:00
had more than 8,000 acre so but we still
28:57:00
have the area where the Kristin own
28:59:00
distillery are they're both working
29:00:00
sites but we have a great Museum and
29:03:00
Education Center working pioneer farm
29:06:00
you know lots of other things to see so
29:08:00
really I think it catches some people by
29:10:00
surprise the array of things you can do
29:12:00
here I think they came Washington land
29:14:00
like a big companies give out options
29:16:00
right because they didn't have a whole
29:18:00
lot of cash so that's how Washington
29:20:00
comes into a lot of land particularly on
29:21:00
the Ohio Valley yeah I know we ended I
29:23:00
know we ended the Revolutionary War with
29:25:00
about 25 million dollars in debt which
29:27:00
in today's money would be XYZ but it's
29:30:00
amazing how these guys what they did
29:33:00
that's how the land was was purchased
29:37:00
back then that's how it was it was just
29:38:00
kind of awarded or or how was that done
29:41:00
it was pretty prevalent again there
29:43:00
wasn't a whole lot of hard cash to be
29:44:00
had in America prior to the creation of
29:49:00
the United States of America so
29:50:00
typically what you saw a lot of
29:52:00
arrangements particularly for those who
29:54:00
had participated in military campaigns
29:56:00
was to grant the soldiers land ah times
30:00:00
at the fringes of the frontier which the
30:03:00
double benefit of not only giving the
30:05:00
soldier some form of materiel
30:07:00
compensation but also encouraging
30:08:00
westward migration some of the officers
30:15:00
to big chunks today that's awesome
30:19:00
that's awesome
30:20:00
alright well Rob thank you so much for
30:23:00
being on the show today I would love to
30:25:00
in you know Warren's okay with it you
30:26:00
know ask you back on down the road I'd
30:28:00
love to hear what's going on and things
30:30:00
that are happening it's just so
30:31:00
interesting I just think that our
30:32:00
listeners once they start getting into
30:34:00
this they'll there really be interested
30:37:00
in we're gonna tie of course this will
30:40:00
be a standalone interview but also
30:43:00
titled some of the highlights in to some
30:46:00
of the things that director Yahoo said
30:47:00
and some of our inventors in the DC area
30:49:00
they're alive and well today and what's
30:52:00
going on sort of politically with the
30:54:00
past so it's going to be a fun mix and
30:56:00
we'll get some b-roll so people can see
30:58:00
it and hopefully everybody who's
31:00:00
listening will put Mount Vernon on their
31:02:00
schedule
31:03:00
make sure they visit well he was one of
31:05:00
the great supporters of our nation and
31:07:00
supporters of innovators today so we
31:10:00
would love to welcome all here to Mount
31:12:00
Vernon thank you
31:14:00
that's awesome really appreciate your
31:16:00
time thank you so much Rob thank you so
31:19:00
much for being on and for any of you
31:21:00
listeners please go on out to Mount
31:24:00
Vernon org and take a look around it's a
31:28:00
great great place to visit if you can
31:30:00
please go on out to iTunes or Google
31:32:00
Play leave us a review give us a rating
31:34:00
would be awesome for you to tell us let
31:36:00
us know how we're doing and also uh what
31:38:00
else you'd like to hear about on the
31:40:00
show we really would like to hear your
31:41:00
feedback Warren and I appreciate you
31:43:00
being on today and we will catch you
31:45:00
next time on total innovations