Warren Interviews Patent Attorney Andrea Hence Evans

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Andrea Hence Evans, Esq. is a member of the Texas bar, a registered Patent Attorney, and a member of the US Supreme Court Bar. Having worked at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for approximately 5 years as both a patent examiner and a trademark examining attorney after graduating from law school, she then launched the intellectual property law practice, The Law Firm of Andrea Hence Evans, which currently represents independent inventors, entrepreneurs, small, medium, and Fortune 100 clients in multiple states and multiple countries with patent, trademark and copyright issues.
Andrea is a 2002 graduate of The George Washington Law School in Washington, DC. She is a graduate of Spelman College and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in Atlanta, Georgia, where she obtained a Bachelors of Science in mathematics and a Bachelors of Civil Engineering, respectively. Attorney Evans is also the owner of KidGINEER, LLC, a hands-on STEM program for children.
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Podcast Notes

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0:00
hi everyone and welcome to the inventors
0:03
launchpad Network
0:04
I am carmine danesco I welcome all of
0:07
you listeners out there I appreciate you
0:09
listening in if you could possibly go
0:11
out to iTunes or Google Play
0:13
leave us a nice review leave us an
0:14
honest review let us know how we're
0:16
doing and if there's some sub nation you
0:18
want us to hear about or you would like
0:20
to hear about it would be great for you
0:22
to let us know today my co-host mr.
0:25
Warren Tuttle for the tunnel innovation
0:27
show we had a great show planned I
0:29
haven't really spoken with Warren this
0:31
week and want to catch up with him to
0:32
see what's going on hey Warren you over
0:34
there I am oh man I caught you up there
0:38
that's awesome very good how's it going
0:39
man you know you're you're always busy
0:41
you're always looking for products I'm
0:43
talking to inventors you probably get
0:44
about a thousand emails a day what's
0:47
going on anything cool happening yeah a
0:49
lot of great stuff I've been traveling a
0:51
lot I've been busy been to a bunch of
0:53
shows the TV show recently an invention
0:56
cottage you know you see we've been
1:00
actually with United inventors
1:01
Association we have a new executive
1:03
director Brian free I don't know if you
1:05
know Brian Brian Sloan island-based and
1:07
well maybe get him on for a future show
1:09
and we've been putting together our
1:12
whole us for the inventors who are
1:14
listening our whole spring schedule of
1:16
inventor pavilions at trade shows and
1:19
since we have Danna on the day it's
1:21
probably appropriate to say we just
1:23
finished talks with the housewares folks
1:26
at D iha to do a uia event a several
1:29
hour uia event special event on Saturday
1:31
the first day of the housewares show
1:33
next March so so never don't know we got
1:37
a lot going on yeah yeah that's awesome
1:39
yeah I do know Brian he's got a great
1:40
reputation in the vendor communities
1:42
that big following too right yeah yeah
1:45
and he brings a lot of energy and
1:48
enthusiasm so it's going to be great
1:50
well cool man I'm glad to hear I know
1:52
you guys always got a lot of stuff going
1:54
on in the house we're sure thing is very
1:55
interesting I want to hear a little bit
1:57
more about that as we for Brett progress
1:59
I'm not working good today I don't know
2:01
what it is got a drink some more water
2:03
but let's bring on our guest man I've
2:05
been waiting for this interview for a
2:06
while and let's bring them on let's talk
2:09
great so it's my pleasure to bring on
2:12
Dan Siegel
2:13
but if I can boast about them a bit dan
2:16
is the president of lifetime brands
2:18
lifetime brands the largest non-electric
2:21
so you know housewares company in the
2:23
country doing business on your almost
2:26
forty different brand names and a
2:28
billion dollars in revenues among other
2:31
brand names they own the brand name
2:32
farmer where but there's many many
2:33
others and I'm sure that the minute I've
2:37
known Dan he's been a good friend and
2:39
we've been working together for I think
2:40
almost 13 years now where I am actually
2:44
involved in the innovation program the
2:45
open innovation program we have there
2:47
and we'll let Dan go into that a bit but
2:49
it's my pleasure to bring on Dan Siegel
2:50
hi Dan hey thanks for having me of
2:53
course of course
2:54
you're now we're in Garden City I'm on
2:57
now in Garden City that's right well
3:00
that's that's the corporate headquarters
3:01
for lifetime grants and I thought we'd
3:04
start the show with some of you may
3:07
recognize the N by the way who was the
3:08
star of a TV show called invention
3:10
hunters for for several years so for
3:13
those of you who he looks familiar to he
3:15
is it he is a TV celebrity and somebody
3:19
used to turn very loosely but Dan I
3:23
thought maybe would start with just you
3:25
know talking about a little bit about
3:27
the history of lifetime brands I know I
3:28
know a lot of people have heard of all
3:30
our brand names but some some folks are
3:33
not not necessarily from over the
3:34
lifetime and company has been around for
3:36
a long time and it's grown dramatically
3:38
over the years and the number one
3:39
housewares company America just maybe
3:41
take us back to where it started and
3:43
where we are today
3:44
yes sure so lifetime started in the mid
3:47
40s and it's a you know we considered a
3:51
true American success story it was
3:53
started by my grandfather and two
3:55
partners and literally it started as you
3:58
know driving around in a station wagon
4:00
and selling knives and that's where the
4:02
company kind of was founded and we look
4:05
at us today and we are a global company
4:07
we are in a hundred and nine different
4:09
countries we are in basically three
4:13
major segments being food preparation
4:15
tabletop and home decor and we sell
4:18
basically every major retailer around
4:21
the globe I think we're in I want to say
4:25
about 11,000 different
4:27
tellers today so quite a big broad
4:30
distribution network we've grown
4:32
tremendously through the years
4:33
combination of organic growth and also
4:36
through acquisitions and we're
4:38
continuing to grow
4:39
we recently merged with another company
4:41
called filament brands we've picked up
4:43
three additional major segments in our
4:46
own business and and we're growing I
4:49
mean it's an exciting time out there
4:50
right now I'm trouble dive into what's
4:52
happening at retail and wholesale and
4:55
you know EECOM and everything else but
4:58
that's a little history of lifetime and
5:00
I've been with the company now for 26
5:02
years when I started with the company we
5:05
were probably around 50 million dollar
5:07
company today were close to you about an
5:10
800 million dollar company publicly
5:12
traded on NASDAQ and so look us up see
5:16
we're about and yeah excited to answer
5:19
any questions you guys may have so the
5:21
symbol under Nasdaq is L cut right L see
5:24
you - yep that's correct
5:26
cool and so before we get into just into
5:29
your specific history Dan what is what
5:33
you know some of the just thinking from
5:37
the from a growth standpoint what are
5:39
what are what are some of the
5:40
significant brand names that we do
5:43
business under you know including Pharma
5:45
we're with some of the others sure so at
5:48
last time we look at its portfolio of
5:49
brands and we we have a combination of
5:52
friends that we own we have brands that
5:55
a license to us and we do private label
5:57
as well so it's basically three segments
6:00
we try to balance out the portfolio to
6:02
make sure that we're weighted the way
6:03
that our strategy dictates we should be
6:05
weighted so most of our business does
6:08
come from our own brands and when it
6:11
comes to our own brands what are the
6:12
ones that are significant that you know
6:14
people really recognize Fargo where
6:16
being one certainly large brand Mikasa
6:19
and tabletop false graph we also have
6:23
the brand built chef in Taylor there's
6:28
Fred and friends those are some of our
6:30
larger brands that we own and then we
6:33
have our major license brand is
6:35
basically KitchenAid at this point which
6:38
is a very large brand for us very
6:40
important brand
6:40
very impactful brand in the marketplace
6:42
and then it comes to private label we do
6:44
a lot of private label you're going to
6:47
William Sonoma we probably do about 80%
6:49
of their tools and gadgets today we do a
6:52
lot for coalesce with food network
6:54
program we do Martha Stewart for Macy's
6:57
amongst many others in the marketplace
6:59
Wow Wow pretty much everyone in America
7:04
is probably come in contact with a
7:06
lifetime brands product yeah I
7:09
definitely walk into anybody's home and
7:11
I can point out that they would have our
7:13
products in their homes I would almost
7:14
guarantee it in some way they do things
7:20
behind the scenes but Dean let's let's
7:25
talk about your background a little bit
7:27
because like you said and you just
7:30
didn't walk into the presidency I know I
7:33
think you started but maybe we could
7:35
just take everybody quickly through and
7:36
if you would tell the story of the
7:40
product
7:41
sure yeah so I started in sales
7:44
basically so I literally you know 26
7:47
years ago would have a cardboard box
7:51
full of knife samples and I'd walked the
7:54
streets in Brooklyn and going to
7:56
independent stores and knock on doors
7:58
and just talk to people I'm sorry and
8:01
hold people up in Brooklyn doesn't not a
8:04
good mix well I'm back in the day the
8:07
parts the parts of Brooklyn that I was
8:08
walking in as a kid from Long Island
8:10
we're probably not the safest parts of
8:12
Brooklyn that are probably much nicer
8:13
today literally I see a store manager
8:16
with box low samples and and try to sell
8:19
you know try to get people to you know
8:22
recognize our products and it was very
8:25
it was very challenging time I'll tell
8:26
you that much
8:27
you know a very shy kid trying to go out
8:29
there and and sell products was not
8:31
really what I envisioned growing up
8:33
that's kind of how I started and I you
8:36
know I just grew from there I started
8:37
taking on some major customers and and
8:39
then started managing other salespeople
8:42
and I just kept growing and really a
8:44
sales were all at about five six years
8:46
ago I will do it to a strategic role
8:48
role of kind of you know mapping out the
8:51
company's strategic plans and
8:52
we see the company over the course of a
8:55
five year change and so I did that for a
8:58
few years and then it's about three
9:00
years ago came two years ago key person
9:02
of the company so it's it's I got to
9:06
really kind of see all sides of the
9:08
business and clearly one of the hardest
9:10
things is the selling side you know
9:12
really kind of getting and selling an
9:15
independent customer in some ways is
9:17
harder than a major retailer because
9:20
when you're talking to an independent
9:21
customer you talking about their own
9:22
money they're literally parting with
9:24
something from their own wallet to you
9:26
to sell a product so they're much more
9:28
passionate about it but then you know
9:30
corporate corporate buyers are very
9:31
sophisticated and they have different
9:33
metrics that they're going to measure
9:34
their themselves by so you start
9:37
learning that but the most important
9:39
thing that I guess I learned from sales
9:40
there are a couple of important things
9:41
is you gotta learn to listen that's more
9:44
important than just speaking you know
9:46
you always have in your head the sales
9:48
person that just blabbers away and
9:50
that's a good sales person to me that's
9:51
the worst sales person sales people that
9:54
learn to listen or the best sales people
9:55
out there you don't have to be the most
9:57
talkative that's one thing the other
10:00
thing that really kind of Steve's with
10:03
me today is about transparency so gotta
10:07
be very transparent and honest you know
10:08
be yourself and that's a cliche about
10:10
being yourself oh yeah you have what
10:12
again a salesperson should be of what
10:14
you think people want you to be but
10:16
that's not who you are
10:17
got to be yourself and that comes across
10:19
people you know appreciate it recognize
10:22
it and you know beginning of my career I
10:24
followed somebody that was very a very
10:28
spoke well very cool helmet could be a
10:31
politician and so I tried to emulate him
10:33
and early in my career and I go to a
10:35
sales cloud I try to be so perfect and
10:36
what I said and everything I did and
10:39
just one day it just you know light bulb
10:41
went on said screw it just be me you
10:43
know I'm talking to people that's all it
10:45
is
10:45
I'm gonna be myself you know it was
10:47
career changing and you know so I
10:50
conduct myself today and and again be
10:52
very transparent particularly when I
10:54
work with Lauren and with the inventors
10:56
that we come in contact with we now past
10:58
that these people are about their ideas
11:01
and their inventions and and you know
11:03
we'll be transparent we'll be honest and
11:05
hope
11:06
we can work out a deal together and if
11:09
we can't that's fine too but it's more
11:12
important to just kind of be in front
11:14
and know where both of us want to
11:17
accomplish from our negotiation or our
11:19
conversation as long as we do that
11:21
everybody's happy in the end and if we
11:23
can't work it out you know with we part
11:24
as friends and that's fine too
11:26
so you know are you asked me about
11:29
that's a good point that you made about
11:31
the independent store owners and getting
11:34
your training there as I used to be one
11:37
years ago and I always say it was you're
11:39
playing with real bullets you know when
11:41
it's your own money you can you can get
11:42
hurt you know yeah absolutely
11:45
did you ever call an ans Abraham yes sir
11:47
no I didn't you know I I never really
11:51
had that that customer I mean I really
11:53
started my major customer that I started
11:57
kind of growing with would be Bed Bath &
12:01
Beyond linens and things you know I was
12:02
in the Northeast so those are some of
12:04
the major customers that I took on
12:05
personally and grew who and they were
12:07
doing very well luckily early in my
12:09
career they were growing through able to
12:10
grow together that's really where I kind
12:12
of got my you know my expertise let's
12:16
say in selling well before we get get
12:19
into talking a little bit more about
12:20
what we're inventors can go and what we
12:22
do there you know I went I always think
12:24
of you and I think of two things that
12:25
are in the company as well I think I
12:26
always think of the company one of the
12:30
things that the catapulted the company
12:31
was the origination of the knife block
12:33
and the importance to that to the
12:37
company's growth and really you know the
12:40
the legacy that that left behind that
12:43
you that you have and so forth for
12:44
innovation and and then of course the
12:47
Samora product which I really really
12:48
want to get in here because I think it's
12:49
the story inventors will enjoy but could
12:52
you could you talk about that that
12:53
launched back whenever the knife block
12:55
was and then a little bit about you some
12:56
more and then we'll get into the
12:57
inventor stuff so yes sure so you know
13:00
lifetime lifetime brands is a company
13:02
about really you know we're a company
13:06
about people but from the other side of
13:09
it is they're a company of innovation
13:10
and we're a company of brands and that's
13:13
something that goes across every single
13:14
person in this organization is that
13:16
that's what we're about
13:18
so when you talk about never
13:20
nation we were the first ones to do a
13:22
slant the knife block and then the first
13:25
ones to do a knife block with steak
13:26
knives in it and that kind of is a you
13:29
know in our world that's a major
13:30
innovation that that's a that's a
13:32
game-changer so we did that and we today
13:35
we have by far the largest share of
13:37
cutlery business in the United States
13:40
it's not even close I mean I'm market
13:42
share is close to 25 percent that's
13:45
incredible
13:46
major brand there is fog aware so you
13:50
know Lauren yes PA but the s'mores maker
13:52
so yeah back some years ago now but I
13:56
was in a Chinese restaurant watching
13:58
them make cocoa platter and so they had
14:01
they familiar with that a flame and
14:03
people are cooking you know that Chinese
14:04
food on that and the thought came about
14:07
doing a s'mores kit instead you know
14:10
roasting a marshmallow like you do
14:11
around campfire so taking the same
14:14
poopoo platter kind of changing it
14:16
making it maybe a little bit more
14:17
appealing and marketing in it that to
14:21
retailers and invention to the consumer
14:24
we launched a s'mores maker which we own
14:26
patent on today to this to this day I
14:28
should say it was the biggest hit in the
14:31
company's history and first year out you
14:34
know over 35 million dollars that retail
14:36
were sold on the s'mores maker and again
14:39
a simple innovation at the end of the
14:41
day it's really just kind of
14:42
retrofitting poopoo platter to make it
14:44
for a mocking a campfire I guess so
14:48
people loved it instead of going outside
14:50
and cooking your marshmallows you do it
14:52
right your house and it became kind of a
14:54
thing families and people to do gather
14:57
around and make s'mores now who doesn't
14:59
like sports a person I'm sick of oh
15:01
because I know my mom said I was out
15:03
demoing them and if I smell a s'more
15:05
today I actually get a little bit of a
15:07
gag reflex but that's neither here nor
15:10
there still a great item and yeah it was
15:12
a exciting thing but again it really
15:14
teaches us and she's the brain this
15:16
company we're about innovation and
15:18
innovation she can be small and
15:20
innovation could be large but
15:21
innovations would excites us and excites
15:24
the customer nice the consumer you know
15:26
we got all these trade shows and we have
15:28
in the company 50,000 active items we
15:32
introduced 5,000 UI
15:34
every year 5000 do you think about that
15:37
so we go to a trade show no retail walks
15:40
in and says to us hey I want to see what
15:42
we've been selling for the last five
15:44
years that's the same question what's
15:47
new it's all anybody ever wants to talk
15:49
about is what's new so we need to have a
15:52
pipeline of new ideas and new products
15:55
consistently and constantly that can
15:58
excite our excuse me excite our retails
16:02
and the other day can sight the consumer
16:04
and that's what we're about we love that
16:05
we get excited about these innovations
16:07
we're not a tech company you know we get
16:10
excited that appeal or just something
16:12
new or a can open it there's something
16:13
new or you know pizza wheel has a new
16:16
feature or function my gosh we like
16:18
little get giddy over it so that's what
16:20
we look for that's what we want we want
16:22
those incremental innovations in the
16:24
kitchen and I think that that's so so
16:27
critical and you know innovation is all
16:31
part of the lifetime prints DNA and and
16:33
that's really where I met Dan you know
16:36
10 or 12 years ago when he started this
16:39
open innovation program at lifetime
16:41
branches it's quite a unique program
16:43
very few companies have something that
16:46
this special immune eeeek most people
16:48
when they're looking for products sort
16:50
of you know put it under you know some
16:53
existing you know area and it's not paid
16:56
a lot of attention to but Dan let's
16:58
let's talk a little bit about about both
17:00
the innovation program that we kind of
17:01
started together and then and then a
17:03
little bit about about lifetime's
17:05
internal development capabilities and
17:07
how that segues in so so I'll let you
17:09
two take the open innovation part first
17:10
yeah sure so you know when we started
17:13
working together
17:13
and one of the things that we looked at
17:15
was we wanted to change the culture that
17:19
if it wasn't invented here wasn't good
17:20
we really wanted to have to get remodel
17:22
more of a PNG type of model that you
17:24
know this great idea is from anybody can
17:27
have a great idea out there and if you
17:29
look at the population United States
17:31
about 320 million people we feel that
17:34
everybody let's say people eat most
17:38
people cook there should be ideas that
17:41
people will have based around just
17:44
playing with products i people are
17:46
passionate about cooking
17:47
we're going to come up there's going to
17:48
be that spark that people have and we
17:51
consistently see that across the board
17:53
particularly in our category we're not
17:55
inventing new drugs here preventing
17:57
things from the kitchen so we have about
17:59
a hundred and fifty full-time people
18:01
that are dedicated to innovation in this
18:04
company between industrial designers and
18:06
graphic designers but how do we now
18:08
catapult that to 320 million people and
18:11
that was a thought process not to war
18:14
I've done together it's just open that
18:16
up open the company up because people
18:18
could have a great idea they have no
18:20
idea how to develop it further and bring
18:23
it to market is very challenging so our
18:25
designers they are very open to that we
18:28
don't take the approach that we did not
18:30
invent it we've changed that culture
18:32
that's that's that's in the past now
18:33
they get excited about taking ideas for
18:36
even from a napkin for that matter and
18:38
then bring it to reality and we work in
18:40
tandem with the inventor community to do
18:41
that we can be very we can take the idea
18:45
and be very collaborative with them or
18:47
we did the idea and we can run with it
18:49
we kind of leave it up to each
18:50
individual inventor how they want to see
18:52
that see that go but again the other day
18:57
it has to be a win win has to be a win
18:59
that we get an innovation that we can
19:00
sell and from the inventor they have to
19:02
have they can see their product to
19:05
market and get a royalty payment to pay
19:07
for that product and really win in it
19:10
and we have multiple multiple hundreds
19:14
now of success stories out in our with
19:18
this program and it's been very exciting
19:19
we love it and Warren's done a great job
19:21
of shepherding these ideas because we
19:25
would get just too many submissions and
19:27
they were gonna get lost in black holes
19:28
so Warren's function with us has been
19:31
terrific we've had a great collaboration
19:32
doing that and it's it's it's really you
19:35
know based in large part on on the
19:38
culture that you've created at the
19:40
company and the belief and that's why I
19:41
try to tie it into the nice block its
19:43
land a nice block and the history the
19:45
company goes back to innovation and I
19:47
think that you know I'm pretty familiar
19:49
with the inventor landscape in the
19:51
company leaves day I don't think there's
19:52
any company in America
19:54
that's as fair as lifetime brands is any
19:57
even one other ones that I work with to
20:00
the
20:00
inventor and to that end maybe did we
20:02
could talk about that a little bit I
20:03
mean every single licensing deal we've
20:06
done and I think we've done over 100 now
20:07
is different in terms of what the
20:10
inventor where they are in the process
20:12
what they want like you were describing
20:14
before you know whether they want us to
20:16
take over the whole project one of it
20:17
whether they want to co-brand it and
20:19
that type of thing we don't steal ideas
20:22
lifetime you know looks at things if we
20:24
say no we don't pursue them in that type
20:26
of thing maybe you could just talk about
20:27
about your philosophy on how we treat
20:29
inventors and the fairness issue there
20:31
yeah so you know we understand that when
20:35
inventor is at a point where they want
20:38
to show something that they are you know
20:40
scared they think someone's going to get
20:43
stolen from them there's a lot of people
20:44
that certainly prey on the infected
20:46
community as we've seen so we really
20:49
taken a very different approach though
20:51
we are a large company or a flexible
20:53
company and at the end of the day want
20:55
people be comfortable they want to
20:57
become to have a comfort level with us
20:58
as a company comfort level so if you are
21:00
and and know that we're not out to harm
21:03
them or to steal anything
21:05
and we really it listen we get one
21:08
person that had a bad experience with
21:09
lifetime that's one person to many and
21:12
for the amount of people that we've
21:13
dealt with over the years I don't think
21:15
you can find one and I guess I would
21:17
look at it like just like we everybody
21:19
looks at rays and reviews today you know
21:21
whether it be on Amazon or
21:23
Wayfarer or Walmart comm or Batman
21:25
whatever that that really drives
21:27
behavior those ratings and reviews well
21:30
same thing here so we want to make sure
21:32
that our ratings and reviews are
21:34
positive five stars with the inventive
21:37
community the same way so we're going to
21:39
treat people fairly and and you know
21:41
Maura knows me if president company if
21:43
there's ever situation that inventor was
21:45
not feet treated fairly by any one of
21:47
our associates that would not be a good
21:50
thing because I'm certainly behind this
21:51
I want to keep getting these ideas I
21:54
believe in the program strongly and I
21:57
believe that it has to be as said
21:58
earlier a win-win for everybody if it's
22:00
not then then we're doing something
22:02
wrong that's so true their support you
22:05
know all it from the top to bottom which
22:06
is a piece on and you know this is an
22:08
ongoing thing you know we do get
22:10
thousands of submissions every year so
22:12
some
22:14
folks aren't quite ready but we get back
22:16
to every single person even if it's with
22:18
an O or you're not ready or it's not for
22:20
us and you know even even next week next
22:23
Tuesday I'm coming down with a local
22:25
inventor who has a very cool reusable
22:27
straw that we set up meetings and that
22:30
and the president division will be there
22:31
you know so that philosophy goes right
22:33
down and they'll get a whole tour of the
22:35
showroom and I would just say to any of
22:37
our listeners if anybody has a cool
22:39
product than they submitted to us they
22:40
can either go through the lifetime
22:41
brands website which is lifetime grants
22:44
calm and follow the instructions on the
22:46
home page do you have a new idea where
22:48
they can go through monastry marketing
22:50
but easier ways to probably go through
22:52
the lifetime site there's its
22:53
questionnaire there and we'll always get
22:55
back to everybody but if you're in the
22:56
New York area and you have something
22:57
call we'd love to see you as well
22:59
so Dan let me just say way that also
23:01
into you know a very very very strong
23:04
product development internal program at
23:08
lifetime like you said 5,000 new
23:10
products a year one of the things that I
23:12
always appreciated from the beginning
23:14
there's never been any friction between
23:16
me and what I do and you know I was a
23:19
little nervous when I first came in the
23:20
building 12 years ago you know how would
23:22
I be received
23:23
I'm very well received because what
23:25
happens in essence is when we license
23:27
these outside products they then become
23:29
part of the internal portfolio maybe you
23:31
just talk about that for a minute yeah
23:33
so I mean yeah they don't they took bad
23:36
behind your back or not to your face I
23:38
want it be clear online no I'm kidding
23:41
so yeah no they you know we do have
23:44
again a large industrial design
23:48
department larger engineering department
23:50
state-of-the-art equipment and truly
23:54
like we are we get excited about these
23:57
inventions so we want them to be part of
23:59
this we want we want them to see kind of
24:02:00
a particular if they if they ever get to
24:03:00
New York we would give a tour of the
24:04:00
showroom tours of the design area but it
24:09:00
does go through a rather robust process
24:11:00
because it's to take an item from
24:14:00
literally a sketch on a napkin or you
24:17:00
know some kind of very you know
24:21:00
rudimentary as we would consider it
24:23:00
design to something that will function
24:26:00
properly
24:27:00
we're experts in our categories so you
24:30:00
know we you know it's kind of funny I
24:34:00
guess I throw this out there so you
24:35:00
watch a video on Kickstarter and a video
24:38:00
is that some design or showing a knife
24:40:00
and he's talking in a maybe an English
24:42:00
accent about how he ripped apart every
24:46:00
knife and did all these shows all these
24:48:00
great sketches and now this is gonna be
24:50:00
the best knife ever but I have a guy
24:52:00
sitting back there his name's Adam Craig
24:54:00
he's been designing knives for 25 years
24:57:00
he's forgotten more on his way to work
25:00:00
then that guy knows completely so we
25:04:00
have people in this he doesn't peak with
25:05:00
a British accent that's the problem he
25:07:00
speaks with a Brooklyn accent but we
25:08:00
should put him on Kickstarter yeah
25:10:00
listen I joked about it I mean nobody
25:12:00
knows more about knife designed in this
25:14:00
guy and you know what with 25 percent
25:17:00
market share in the category he knows
25:19:00
what he's doing you know some guy that
25:21:00
just you know skip some things doesn't
25:23:00
have the the expertise he you know again
25:25:00
this guy's bringing in so you know but
25:29:00
in every one of our businesses within
25:31:00
the kitchen we have these experts so
25:33:00
somebody can sit there and have a great
25:35:00
again we believe in these great ideas
25:37:00
but how it functions in said category
25:41:00
you requires tremendous expertise
25:44:00
particularly something as an
25:45:00
articulating aspect to it but even just
25:49:00
basic things we understand how things
25:51:00
work so again we know there's great
25:53:00
ideas and inventions that come from the
25:55:00
outside but bringing them to market so
25:56:00
they function properly and more
25:59:00
importantly are safe that's another
26:01:00
thing you know be sure well so we
26:03:00
understand all the product safeties
26:05:00
issues all the things that can trip
26:08:00
somebody up if they do it on their own
26:10:00
or when with a lesser company we obsess
26:13:00
about these things I mean we have about
26:16:00
close to about 250 people just in China
26:20:00
alone what we do most of our
26:21:00
manufacturing going around to these
26:24:00
factories with iPads that have quality
26:28:00
manufacturing technicalities on them
26:31:00
that they sit there the inspectors and
26:34:00
it's this is all baked into our system
26:36:00
based on experience and things that we
26:39:00
know could go wrong in any one cat
26:41:00
this is what we obsess over this is what
26:43:00
we do I mean again with the amount of
26:46:00
products we have in the amount of market
26:47:00
share that we we've achieved we know
26:50:00
better than anybody how to bring a power
26:52:00
to market that is safe it functions
26:55:00
properly and will be at the right retail
26:57:00
for the consumer so they'll actually buy
26:58:00
it you know the amount of equipment in
27:02:00
in in the lifetime headquarters
27:04:00
dedicated product development it's
27:06:00
amazing it's millions of dollars
27:07:00
equipment it's not just 3d printers you
27:09:00
know sophisticated things it's all types
27:11:00
of stuff back there you know we've had
27:13:00
three national open houses for inventors
27:16:00
karma and if you're ever up in the New
27:18:00
York area you got to come come and see
27:20:00
it we'll set up another one after the
27:22:00
housewares show maybe next exercise for
27:24:00
your summer but it's a great opportunity
27:26:00
and we've had 80 to 100 inventors come
27:29:00
in for each one of them where people can
27:30:00
really take the tour of the building so
27:31:00
if anybody is really serious you know
27:34:00
who's listening who's got a serious
27:35:00
product as well along the way reach out
27:38:00
to us reach out to me as well ww telecom
27:42:00
or lifetime grants calm and and make
27:45:00
sure that you know if you're in the New
27:48:00
York area if you've got something
27:49:00
serious we could certainly show you all
27:50:00
the stuff so so you said you know all of
27:53:00
the people dedicated you know internally
27:56:00
all the people in China and so forth
27:58:00
could you just touch on something real
28:00:00
quick down that you spoke about earlier
28:02:00
and that's now and I know that you've
28:04:00
had a lot to do with this and your
28:05:00
travel schedules ridiculous
28:06:00
the overseas development there's now
28:08:00
sort of a lifetime brands in Europe I
28:10:00
know in Brazil you know part ownership
28:13:00
over coming in Mexico and so forth and I
28:15:00
think that when people have ideas and
28:17:00
they bring to us they don't realize that
28:18:00
lifetime has this full worldwide reach
28:21:00
maybe you could talk about about Europe
28:22:00
and a little bit yeah sure so so we got
28:26:00
to come a few companies around around
28:28:00
the world so we have a two companies in
28:32:00
the UK which gives us distribution in
28:36:00
the UK in continental Europe with
28:38:00
actually the largest house for a company
28:40:00
in the UK believe it or not with a brand
28:42:00
with a company called kitchen craft and
28:44:00
also the brand that they use so yes we
28:46:00
have reach into as I mentioned earlier
28:49:00
109 countries so we certainly can cover
28:52:00
North America South America
28:54:00
Europe we do some in Asia remember that
28:57:00
cooking the way they cook it very
29:00:00
different than the way we cook and the
29:02:00
way they dine is different than where we
29:03:00
dine but Europe is very similar so
29:05:00
really a lot more cross over there and
29:07:00
also in South America
29:09:00
so yeah when somebody has an idea we
29:11:00
take it to our partners and other parts
29:13:00
of our company globally it's not just in
29:16:00
the United States and this cliff a it's
29:19:00
been funny there's been some items that
29:21:00
we've passed on in the US because the
29:24:00
markets too small but in in Europe the
29:26:00
market may be much larger I'll give you
29:28:00
an example was that you know a Mezzaluna
29:29:00
that we worked on wine a mess Aluna in
29:33:00
the United States is what we would
29:34:00
consider a D item it doesn't generate a
29:37:00
lot of sales that the market size is
29:39:00
rather small which are things that we
29:41:00
take into serious consideration for
29:42:00
taking on a project but in the UK a
29:45:00
Mezzaluna is an a item you know it's a
29:48:00
big selling item they use it very
29:50:00
differently and our so our partners in
29:54:00
Europe went after it so there could be
29:56:00
and sometimes the items will completely
29:58:00
global you mean you don't really find as
29:59:00
many of those as you would think but if
30:02:00
something doesn't work in this doesn't
30:04:00
mean it wouldn't work in another part of
30:05:00
our company
30:07:00
I'll give you an ironic example like
30:09:00
even a Canada so a potato masher in the
30:14:00
United States on a kitchen gadget wall
30:16:00
it's considered an a/d if not lower SKU
30:21:00
it's just not a big selling item
30:22:00
Americans do not really use potato
30:24:00
masher all that much it's a decent item
30:26:00
but it doesn't serve cell like a Turner
30:29:00
or spoon or something like that you go
30:32:00
into Canada the Canadians love mashed
30:34:00
potatoes obviously so that becomes like
30:37:00
an a item in Canada so it's even like
30:39:00
you know just across our North border
30:40:00
there are differences in the way people
30:42:00
cook all those golf fans that yell out
30:46:00
mashed potatoes Warren I don't play golf
30:49:00
like here I can work I got a company to
30:52:00
run here the latest goofy craze but no
30:55:00
but I'm getting yeah Matthew and his
30:57:00
team over and Engler doing a great job
30:59:00
and I'm getting more more leads dan from
31:02:00
England Scotland just got one from
31:04:00
Scotland the other day
31:05:00
so now how you expensed the trip was was
31:08:00
a lead generation for business and of
31:11:00
course is in Scotland I you really took
31:14:00
it to a new low there was a prison but I
31:23:00
will tell you you married a same picture
31:26:00
but I will tell you a really funny funny
31:28:00
story
31:29:00
a woman reached out from Scotland and
31:31:00
right before we were leaving and and she
31:34:00
had been sent to me from from Matthew
31:36:00
and in England and and so I communicated
31:38:00
back and forth and filled out ndas
31:39:00
non-disclosure agreements and all that
31:41:00
got everything prior and I said she said
31:43:00
well I'm from Scotland I said that's so
31:44:00
funny I'm gonna be there this weekend so
31:47:00
she said I I want to meet you she said
31:49:00
she said I'll Drive well I said I said
31:51:00
well how do you even know if I'll be in
31:53:00
the area of Scotland you're in she does
31:54:00
I'll drive to wherever you are and I
31:56:00
said I said really it's my wife's
31:57:00
birthday she was drink I said you can't
32:01:00
do it anyway that's sort of funny but
32:03:00
these are the types of conversations we
32:04:00
have but hey carmine maybe maybe you'd
32:06:00
like to jump in at the end here with a
32:08:00
couple questions you've been listening
32:09:00
oh man we all know the inventors are
32:12:00
great they're so passionate about what
32:14:00
they do as as dan had talked about dan
32:16:00
first of all I love everything you guys
32:19:00
are doing everything that you talked
32:20:00
about it is just so amazing to have a
32:23:00
company like yours how how much you've
32:26:00
grown you've never really lost sight of
32:28:00
the inventors and the guys that feed
32:30:00
those products to you and I really
32:32:00
commend everything that you're doing and
32:35:00
I'm not just saying that I mean it's
32:36:00
just awesome how you are interacting
32:38:00
with inventors yeah thank you you know
32:41:00
again as I mentioned we we take it
32:43:00
seriously we believe in it and you know
32:45:00
we don't just talk to talk we walk the
32:47:00
walk so absolutely appreciate that yeah
32:50:00
one thing that I do want our listeners
32:52:00
to know about it and you've done so
32:54:00
great it's you know I could see why
32:56:00
you're on TV man you just love this
32:58:00
stuff I mean it's not like you're just
32:59:00
sitting there talking about
33:00:00
automatically I mean you are seriously
33:02:00
love what you're doing and it it comes
33:04:00
out while you're talking about it
33:07:00
yeah thanks have a good actor I guess it
33:15:00
is good
33:19:00
it's so nice I could see the passion
33:21:00
your eye when you're traveling or you
33:23:00
walking to and your friends houses when
33:25:00
you get to see a product that you took
33:26:00
from like you said a napkin or a
33:28:00
rudimentary of prototype and you develop
33:31:00
that and you help them work with the
33:32:00
inventor and you see that product in
33:34:00
action and in someone's house or out on
33:36:00
the street or someone walking through it
33:38:00
is just so fun and so nice to be able to
33:40:00
know that you were a part of that
33:42:00
they're there literally is nothing
33:45:00
better so I mean I remember very early
33:48:00
on I had an idea for a package on a
33:50:00
product when I was in sales live my
33:52:00
first year and so we changed some copy
33:54:00
on a package and and added some things I
33:57:00
wanted and it ended up on a retail shelf
34:00:00
and I just married just was just we just
34:01:00
copy on a package I'm like man I did
34:03:00
that and it kind of stuck with me you
34:06:00
know to this day and there's no better
34:09:00
feeling I mean it's even crazier honest
34:11:00
I think we've talked about the s'mores
34:12:00
earlier it's worth saying and you know
34:15:00
we're a company that you know so on the
34:18:00
package we wanted to show it in use so
34:21:00
we grabbed five people from the company
34:23:00
to like make like a little kitchen scene
34:25:00
right
34:26:00
they weren't actors actually one of them
34:27:00
turned out to be my wife and we kind of
34:29:00
get married after that but anyway so we
34:32:00
had these five people from the cotton
34:33:00
company like two people in accounting
34:35:00
you know one you know here really just
34:37:00
aren't no associates and you know put
34:39:00
him on box and so the sports maker took
34:41:00
off and we started getting people
34:44:00
sending in they were recreating the
34:47:00
scene in their own homes so to show you
34:51:00
how crazy we are then we would take
34:53:00
those scenes and we mock-up a real
34:55:00
package and send it back to the people
34:57:00
we love what we're doing I mean this is
35:00:00
so cool like you know we have you over
35:02:00
Pennsylvania you know like with around
35:04:00
their family and people in like Virginia
35:06:00
and we was literally making mock-up oxes
35:08:00
and sending him back out to them came
35:10:00
this little cottage thing that was
35:11:00
really fun and cool so yeah so when you
35:15:00
develop something use something that
35:17:00
you've done and you see it on a retail
35:20:00
shuffle you see it in in somebody's home
35:22:00
I gotta tell you man it is it is gray it
35:26:00
is so fun you feel like really had an
35:28:00
impact
35:28:00
and I love it I think anybody that's
35:31:00
experienced dated too high that's what I
35:33:00
would say and you know if anybody if
35:35:00
anybody wants another opportunity to
35:37:00
meet Dan someday or or the lifetime team
35:40:00
come to the housewares show in Chicago
35:42:00
it's an early March every year it's a
35:44:00
three days show if you're developing and
35:46:00
working on a housewares product it's a
35:48:00
it's a great opportunity to see what's
35:50:00
going on in the industry you know come
35:52:00
by will give you a tour that boosts the
35:53:00
lifetime brands booth by square footage
35:55:00
is the biggest who's at the show and Dan
35:58:00
is always there on the floor 24/7
36:00:00
through the show you know making sure he
36:02:00
meets everybody I bring a lot of
36:03:00
inventors over just to say hi very very
36:05:00
accessible
36:06:00
you know nobody hides behind it's not
36:08:00
transparent and if you come at lunch
36:10:00
we'll give you a sandwich too so think
36:13:00
about coming to the show I brought many
36:14:00
people back to those sandwiches there
36:16:00
the other thing is to is to tour the the
36:19:00
invention area the inventor area that
36:21:00
the United manners Association which I'm
36:23:00
the president of has been very integral
36:26:00
in developing and we're gonna have a big
36:28:00
program there this year so so you know I
36:31:00
really appreciate your time I know a
36:33:00
half-an-hour goes quickly here but I
36:35:00
think it's been really informative and I
36:37:00
hope that our listeners will feel very
36:39:00
comfortable like you said in the
36:40:00
beginning a lot of folks are just very
36:42:00
nervous you know about going to a big
36:44:00
company and and like here you're really
36:46:00
explaining we're not really we're a big
36:48:00
coming but we're not really a big
36:49:00
company we're a bunch of individuals to
36:51:00
try to make everybody feel at home so
36:54:00
yeah and I would I would kind of second
36:56:00
that that a lot of inventors yes they
36:58:00
are nervous but as Dan said they're
37:01:00
approachable Google his brand Google his
37:03:00
website google his name and you'll see
37:05:00
that they're not out there stealing
37:07:00
ideas they're trying to help the
37:08:00
inventors and that's what's so great
37:10:00
about this is that people could come to
37:13:00
you Dan with all different phases they
37:14:00
could have been developing just a napkin
37:15:00
or they could have a prototype but your
37:17:00
your guys will help them which is
37:19:00
something that not too many companies
37:21:00
are doing so I think it's just awesome
37:22:00
good I appreciate they found me on guys
37:25:00
you know what and one last thing by the
37:27:00
way just so everybody knows this just
37:32:00
the inventor gets to keep their entire
37:34:00
royalty that we're this is there's no
37:36:00
middleman here I work you know in
37:39:00
conjunction with lifetime they reward me
37:41:00
and take care of me which is another
37:42:00
amazing thing about the companies I
37:44:00
don't have to be put in a situation
37:46:00
where I'm you know working you know
37:49:00
getting paid by inventors and all the
37:51:00
mess that goes along with that there's
37:53:00
so many folks in America that work on
37:54:00
that model that you know sort of cross
37:56:00
over the line and then there's a lot of
37:58:00
people that take advantage of inventors
37:59:00
you will you will get your full you know
38:02:00
funds here directly to you and all we
38:04:00
are here to do is to advocate and help
38:06:00
you so that's another very very unique
38:07:00
thing about our program so thanks Dan
38:11:00
really appreciate it I hope I'll see you
38:13:00
next week if you're around yep sounds
38:15:00
good thanks for having me once again and
38:17:00
have a good weekend guys all right thank
38:19:00
you thank you yeah for all you listeners
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out there please go on out to lifetime
38:23:00
brands com check it out look at the
38:25:00
website it's awesome
38:27:00
if you have an idea you have a product
38:29:00
that you might want to present go ahead
38:30:00
and do that through the website or get
38:32:00
in touch with mr. Warren Tuttle you
38:33:00
everybody knows him everybody sees them
38:35:00
he's always out there looking for
38:36:00
products I thank you all for listening
38:37:00
and we'll catch you next time on the
38:39:00
inventors launchpad network you all take
38:41:00
care right awesome thanks thank you
38:47:00
thank you